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-   -   Triumph Tiger 800 (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=599070)

Mercury264 05-01-2012 07:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimjim (Post 18585695)
CJ Designs rack, Seahorse case with QFS mounts. Rack is well made and perfect size IMO.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...ostcount=11576

JimJim - are you the same inmate who mounted Pelican type cases using adel clamps ? If so, how did that work out for you ?

the_babaji 05-01-2012 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markbvt (Post 18579051)
That's the AKI scale, same as the US (also known as the (R+M)/2 scale). The RON scale, used in Europe, uses higher numbers.

--mark

I did not read the post carefully enough, and I was always under the impression the octane number on the pumps in the States were higher than what I was used to seeing at home. Or is it just that the 'Super Duper' grades were available all over and not just a few locations? How high do the octane ratings in the states? I was sure I had seen some 95 or greater at one time, mind you this could have been 15 years ago or more.

helotaxi 05-02-2012 05:27 AM

Depends on where you are in the States. Highest octane available at every station is based on the elevation of the area. In the higher elevations, 91 is usually the highest you'll find unless the station specifically sells Super Premium. At sea level, 93 is the norm. Regular and mid-grade are lower octane at higher altitudes as well.

fbj913 05-02-2012 05:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by helotaxi (Post 18592303)
Depends on where you are in the States. Highest octane available at every station is based on the elevation of the area. In the higher elevations, 91 is usually the highest you'll find unless the station specifically sells Super Premium. At sea level, 93 is the norm. Regular and mid-grade are lower octane at higher altitudes as well.

Not sure elevation has anything to do with it. 87-91 is normally at every station. You can find 93 at most if not all BP. I think there is some higher octane on the west coast specific to the gas station...

jimjim 05-02-2012 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264 (Post 18589947)
JimJim - are you the same inmate who mounted Pelican type cases using adel clamps ? If so, how did that work out for you ?

Nope not me.

jphish 05-02-2012 07:13 AM

Some places in western US have 85, 88, 91 octane as the choices. But most are 87, 89, 91. Though a few small towns with 1 pump, only offer 87. My question is: whats the issue ? One of the positive attributes of 800 tiggers is... they run fine on 87.

fbj913 05-02-2012 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jphish (Post 18592941)
Some places in western US have 85, 88, 91 octane as the choices. But most are 87, 89, 91. Though a few small towns with 1 pump, only offer 87. My question is: whats the issue ? One of the positive attributes of 800 tiggers is... they run fine on 87.

yes I ment 87-91! Ill fix my above statement.

fbj913 05-02-2012 07:55 AM

I have run 87-97 (with Amsoil treatment) and I can not get a real differenct in mileage yet. So far I can not find a reason to spend the extra money!

markbvt 05-02-2012 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fbj913 (Post 18593255)
I have run 87-97 (with Amsoil treatment) and I can not get a real differenct in mileage yet. So far I can not find a reason to spend the extra money!

There is no reason to spend the extra money. Higher-octane gas doesn't contain more energy, it's just not as combustible, which is necessary for certain engines (higher compression, for example). If the engine can run on 87 octane without detonation issues, there's no advantage in using higher-octane gas. It's just a waste of money.

--mark

fbj913 05-02-2012 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markbvt (Post 18593559)
There is no reason to spend the extra money. Higher-octane gas doesn't contain more energy, it's just not as combustible, which is necessary for certain engines (higher compression, for example). If the engine can run on 87 octane without detonation issues, there's no advantage in using higher-octane gas. It's just a waste of money.

--mark

I think thats what I just said. :beer

Rob Dirt 05-02-2012 09:10 AM

I don't want to turn this into an oil thread, but at elevation (like 9000ft in Ouray,CO) premium gas is only 85 octane. Regular is something like 80 octane. Look it up.

Mercury264 05-02-2012 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimjim (Post 18592501)
Nope not me.

Damn :lol3

Do you (or anyone for that matter) know if Seahorse make an equivalent to the Pelican 1550 ? I can't find one anywhere - they are all either smaller or a different shape (flatter and wider) than the Pelican. I like the Seahorse prices but I want something more the shape of the 1550's.

Marsh Tiger 05-02-2012 09:44 AM

More altitude= less O2 to burn gas with= less need for octane.

CPORet 05-02-2012 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264 (Post 18594114)
Damn :lol3

Do you (or anyone for that matter) know if Seahorse make an equivalent to the Pelican 1550 ? I can't find one anywhere - they are all either smaller or a different shape (flatter and wider) than the Pelican. I like the Seahorse prices but I want something more the shape of the 1550's.


Another brand you might take a look at is Nanuk. They're a Canadian brand I stumbled across at a trade show in Vegas in January. Much better looking (IMHO) than the Pelican or Seahorse. They have a more rounded style, and have a few features that Pelican & Seahorse don't. They're quite reasonable, and can be gotten for quite a deal on Amazon (especially Prime, with free shipping). I mounted one on an SW-Motech bracket as a top case on my Tiger 800. As soon as Uncle Sam coughs up another retirement check, I'll get two more for sidecases.

The Nanuk 940 is very similar in size to the Pelican 1550, being just a tad larger.

jimjim 05-02-2012 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264 (Post 18594114)
Damn :lol3

Do you (or anyone for that matter) know if Seahorse make an equivalent to the Pelican 1550 ? I can't find one anywhere - they are all either smaller or a different shape (flatter and wider) than the Pelican. I like the Seahorse prices but I want something more the shape of the 1550's.

The Seahorse SE-720 is close but still slightly smaller than the 1550.

Inside dimensions of 720 = 18.38" x 13.28" x 6.22"

Inside dimensions of 1550 = 18.43" x 14.00" x 7.62"


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