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Poolside 01-12-2005 06:51 PM

String Plug Tire Repair
 
<BR><BR>String Plug Tire Repair

I end up doing this more than a few times a year and I hope you find this photo essay informative. It may allow some riders to view a string plug as an excellent and permanent repair choice.

- Jim



--------------------------


A couple of weeks ago I found this screw in the rear tire. I don't know how long it was in there.

Unless the tire is flat when I find it, I leave things like this in the tire for a while. And instead monitor the tire pressure.

While I monitored the tire pressure, this screw remained in the tire for two additional tanks of gas. The tire lost 3 pounds of air pressure over ten days. Based on that leak rate, the screw had been in the tire for no more than a week before it was discovered.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...etal_screw.jpg



These pieces of road debris made holes in this tire and the last tire. Two each. All four holes were string plugged. Every string plug-repaired tire has remained in service until worn smooth. I have never worn out a rear tire without first getting at least one hole in it, and repairing it with some type of plug or patch.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...gn_objects.jpg



This will be the second string plug repair for this tire. Here are two views of the first string plug repair, after 5000 miles.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._mile_plug.jpg

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._plug_zoom.jpg



Typical string plug repair supplies. These are from Camel. I have used Monkey Grip brand with equal results.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...l_supplies.jpg



Different brands of string plugs have different instructions. (The Monkey Grip brand says not to use rubber cement on their string plugs.)

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...structions.jpg



Unscrew with pliers.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...ug/unscrew.jpg



Once the 'temporary plug' is removed the hole starts leaking.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...orary_plug.jpg


Placing the burr in the hole will stop the air leak. Or, let the tire depressurize. Neither makes any difference to the repair. But if your bike does not have a center stand, maybe you do not want to let the tire go fully flat.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._plug/burr.jpg



Two strokes with the burr. Without cement.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...g/dry_burr.jpg



Add some cement to 'flush' the rubber particles.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...urr_cement.jpg



Coating the plug with rubber cement makes installation easier. Rubber cement can be used with Camel string plugs. The Monkey Grip brand instructs not to use rubber cement with their string plugs. With Camel string plugs, use rubber cement or not.

The rubber cement is neither sealing the hole, nor holding the string plug in place. The string plug is made of viscous 'goop', and this 'goop' is doing both those jobs. The string serves to get the viscous 'goop' into the hole. Using rubber cement is fully optional.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...lug_cement.jpg



Insert the string plug to the depth in the instructions. If you make a mistake and push the plug all the way into the tire, just put in another plug.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...lug_insert.jpg



Trim to fit.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...acto_slice.jpg



And refill tire.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair.../foot_pump.jpg



As you like it.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...auge_42psi.jpg



The plug may bulge small bit after airing the tire up. And it can be trimmed flush with a razor. If the hole is on a tread block as this one was, trimming the plug flush is important.

If the string plug is placed in the tread siping, trimming the string flush is not as important. The other string plug in this tire is in the siping. And it was trimmed to the tread depth at the time. (see images 3 and 4 above)

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...dy_for_air.jpg

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...azor_slice.jpg

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...mmed_flush.jpg



It's fixed. Let's go for a ride.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...efore_ride.jpg



After about 20 miles, the plug looks like this. Riding pushes the excess 'goop' to the side.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...after_ride.jpg



I rubbed the excess off so you can see.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._ride_zoom.jpg



That's it. Good as new.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...ood_as_new.jpg
<BR><BR>

The Walrus 01-12-2005 07:11 PM

Yup, I've had to do this before and you've got it nailed.
:rofl





I hope you know that there's some flames coming from the crowd who NEVER will condone fixing a flat and then actually using that tire.

:freaky

scooteraug02 01-12-2005 07:17 PM

I had to use a plug recently and it got me home from out in the middle of nowhere. My tire was flat a week later when I went out to check it. I don't think I used enough glue. I keep the kit with me all the time.

I found these tire tips from Dunlop TIPS . They say max speed after a repair should be 75 with a plug patch.

The subject of Tire Patches is probably as touchey as OIL. I probably had a thousand miles left on my Tourance when I plugged it but I replaced it anyway. I figure a new Tourance is $100, medical expenses can add up quickly so I go conservative.

Anorak 01-12-2005 07:24 PM

You might want to add some disclaimers. It is possible that the cords are damaged so I wouldn't treat it like new until I had at least 1k miles on it which should allow a separation to show itself. Also it is probably a bad idea to leave the puncture causing item in the tire once you find it because it might locally overheat the tire carcass through more flexing. Having said that I have used string plugs many times on car tires and a few on bikes with no ill effects. On bikes though I feel much more comfortable with the internal patch because the air pressure inside the tire will tend to force it against the liner of the tire.

Frank Warner 01-12-2005 07:27 PM

Some people like to flatten the tyre befor inserting the string.

I prefer to get the string in there as quick as possible - less pumping up afterwards. So I generally have everything ready to use before removing the offending nail/screw/bit of wood/metal. Oh and I think the string acts as a filler, not just to carry the glue.

Interbnal patches = dissmounting the tyre and putin it back on. Not something i can do beside the road easily.

I too usually run the tyre to its rubber end. It is my life and I take reasonable precautions.

JohnTM 01-12-2005 07:27 PM

I can't believe you would ride on a tire with a plug patch!


I thought I was the only one who did that.

Anyway, I never trim the plugs flush - they do fine. Mushroom a bit at first, but 50 miles smooths them right out.

And string plugs are defn'tly the way to go. I've been through a bunch of the rubber plugs (the ones with the expensive plug gun) and they do not hold up reliably. If there is a cord pressing against the side of the rubber plug, it will shear off in no time.

rideLD 01-12-2005 08:27 PM

Why string type
 
I have been using the progressive suspension style plug for the last 15 years or so. http://www.progressivesuspension.com...pair-kits.html
Every one that I have used have outlasted the tire. Never had one fail or any problems with cords cutting them. I have never really heard anyone recommend the string type before. What are the advantages of the string type over the progressive style? I'm guessing they are a lot cheaper, what else?

Lone Rider 01-12-2005 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Poolside

String Plug Tire Repair

I end up doing this more than a few times a year and I hope you find this photo essay informative. It may allow some riders to view a string plug as an excellent and permanent repair choice.

- Jim



--------------------------


A couple of weeks ago I found this screw in the rear tire. I don't know how long it was in there.

Unless the tire is flat when I find it, I leave things like this in the tire for a while. And instead monitor the tire pressure.

While I monitored the tire pressure, this screw remained in the tire for two additional tanks of gas. The tire lost 3 pounds of air pressure over ten days. Based on that leak rate, the screw had been in the tire for no more than a week before it was discovered.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...etal_screw.jpg



These pieces of road debris made holes in this tire and the last tire. Two each. All four holes were string plugged. Every string plug-repaired tire has remained in service until worn smooth. I have never worn out a rear tire without first getting at least one hole in it, and repairing it with some type of plug or patch.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...gn_objects.jpg



This will be the second string plug repair for this tire. Here are two views of the first string plug repair, after 5000 miles.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._mile_plug.jpg

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._plug_zoom.jpg



Typical string plug repair supplies. These are from Camel. I have used Monkey Grip brand with equal results.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...l_supplies.jpg



Different brands of string plugs have different instructions. (The Monkey Grip brand says not to use rubber cement on their string plugs.)

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...structions.jpg



Unscrew with pliers.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...ug/unscrew.jpg



Once the 'temporary plug' is removed the hole starts leaking.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...orary_plug.jpg


Placing the burr in the hole will stop the air leak. Or, let the tire depressurize. Neither makes any difference to the repair. But if your bike does not have a center stand, maybe you do not want to let the tire go fully flat.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._plug/burr.jpg



Two strokes with the burr. Without cement.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...g/dry_burr.jpg



Add some cement to 'flush' the rubber particles.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...urr_cement.jpg



Coating the plug with rubber cement makes installation easier. Rubber cement can be used with Camel string plugs. The Monkey Grip brand instructs not to use rubber cement with their string plugs. With Camel string plugs, use rubber cement or not.

The rubber cement is neither sealing the hole, nor holding the string plug in place. The string plug is made of viscous 'goop', and this 'goop' is doing both those jobs. The string serves to get the viscous 'goop' into the hole. Using rubber cement is fully optional.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...lug_cement.jpg



Insert the string plug to the depth in the instructions. If you make a mistake and push the plug all the way into the tire, just put in another plug.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...lug_insert.jpg



Trim to fit.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...acto_slice.jpg



And refill tire.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair.../foot_pump.jpg



As you like it.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...auge_42psi.jpg



The plug may bulge small bit after airing the tire up. And it can be trimmed flush with a razor. If the hole is on a tread block as this one was, trimming the plug flush is important.

If the string plug is placed in the tread siping, trimming the string flush is not as important. The other string plug in this tire is in the siping. And it was trimmed to the tread depth at the time. (see images 3 and 4 above)

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...dy_for_air.jpg

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...azor_slice.jpg

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...mmed_flush.jpg



It's fixed. Let's go for a ride.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...efore_ride.jpg



After about 20 miles, the plug looks like this. Riding pushes the excess 'goop' to the side.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...after_ride.jpg



I rubbed the excess off so you can see.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair..._ride_zoom.jpg



That's it. Good as new.

http://www.motofab.com/images/repair...ood_as_new.jpg


I've always enjoyed your posts!

BiG DoM 01-12-2005 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lone Rider
I've always enjoyed your posts!

OH - is that why you qouted the whole photo essay again??? :D

Jim Moore 01-13-2005 03:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rc46
What are the advantages of the string type over the progressive style? I'm guessing they are a lot cheaper, what else?

They're cheap, they're available at every auto parts store in the country, and they're just about impossible to screw up. I give them a huge thumbs up. :thumb

BeemerChef 01-13-2005 03:22 AM

Really!!! :cry :cry :cry

frazz 01-13-2005 04:53 AM

Good post... :thumb

Poolside 01-13-2005 01:50 PM

<BR>Progressive Suspension plugs
http://www.progressivesuspension.com...ools/RPK-3.jpg

Quote:

Originally Posted by rc46
I have been using the progressive suspension style plug for the last 15 years or so. http://www.progressivesuspension.com...pair-kits.html
Every one that I have used have outlasted the tire. Never had one fail or any problems with cords cutting them. I have never really heard anyone recommend the string type before. What are the advantages of the string type over the progressive style? I'm guessing they are a lot cheaper, what else?

I took a look at the Prog. Susp. tire plug link, RC. This is the first time I've seen them. How are they installed?

And sure, I realize that tire patching/plugging is a potentially volatile topic. This thread is not so much a recommendation of one type of plug over another as it is to offer some information. I mean, maybe a rider is strongly averse to string plugs. I remember when I first saw one, and thinking it was some kind of joke.

At that time, I did not know what kind of joke they were. And was forced to try one because, if you have a tire puncture, they are surely better than no plug.

I am glad that people liked the post. Thanks everyone.

- Jim<BR><BR>

bemiiten 01-13-2005 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Poolside
<BR>Progressive Suspension plugs
http://www.progressivesuspension.com...ools/RPK-3.jpg



I took a look at the Prog. Susp. tire plug link, RC. This is the first time I've seen them. How are they installed?

And sure, I realize that tire patching/plugging is a potentially volatile topic. This thread is not so much a recommendation of one type of plug over another as it is to offer some information. I mean, maybe a rider is strongly averse to string plugs. I remember when I first saw one, and thinking it was some kind of joke.

At that time, I did not know what kind of joke they were. And was forced to try one because, if you have a tire puncture, they are surely better than no plug.

I am glad that people liked the post. Thanks everyone.

- Jim<BR><BR>

These are the type of plugs to avoid. Get the string type.

Frank Warner 01-13-2005 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rc46
. I have never really heard anyone recommend the string type before. What are the advantages of the string type over the progressive style? I'm guessing they are a lot cheaper, what else?

Easier to fit. Smaller packed size. You can run the string through the hole a number of times if the hole is large - thus it fits various size holes. Over 'ere truckies use them. On Road Trains - the seen - tractor - 10 wheels - first traioler 8 wheels 2 & 3 trailer add 16 - total 34 wheels - that is a lot of potential flat tyres and they use string.


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