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-   -   Parallel Twin F650 Dakar (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=77849)

StromCrow 04-30-2005 07:56 AM

Parallel Twin F650 Dakar
 
Cycle world is saying the BMW F series bikes are to become the T series with an 80 horsepower twin. So they say look for a Dakar adventure bike with this engine to be coming out. Dayum! That would be awesome!:D

John E Davies 04-30-2005 08:57 AM

If it doesn't weigh _at least_ 50 pounds less than the current F650GS Dakar I wouldn't look twice at it. BMW needs to seriously lighten up that bike, and offer serious suspension like the KTMs.

John

alyef 05-01-2005 09:51 AM

Maybe they will put a parallel 650cc twin with a chain drive in a frame similar to the new HP2. Considering that the HP2 is 175 kg ( 385 lbs) and the F650 is 391 lbs dry, I would think that BMW should be able to do it pretty easily.

The Fist 05-01-2005 10:07 AM

This is good news....sort of....

My biggest complaint about the HP2 is its sheer size and unnecessary bulk for the sort of adv-riding we all enjoy...a lighter, more aptly suspended version of the 650 would be excellent....why should the KTM boys have all the fun?

Mr.Grumpy 05-01-2005 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John E Davies
If it doesn't weigh _at least_ 50 pounds less than the current F650GS Dakar I wouldn't look twice at it. BMW needs to seriously lighten up that bike, and offer serious suspension like the KTMs.

John

If it weighs TEN pounds less it will be more powerfull and lighter than a 650 V-strom. 50 pounds will still be 50 more than a 640 or KLR. What's the point of 50 pounds?

I saw the pic in hte magazine and fron the photo and the caption it was kinda clear that even if BMW does a Dakar to the bike it's more of a sport bike than a dual sport any way....

slide 05-01-2005 10:19 AM

I think you'll find the KTM 950 is heavier than the HP so I doubt you can say the KTM crowd has any exclusive on fun. Curiously, some don't seem to mind greater mass. Consider that the many folks stroll right by the 1200GS and buy the 1150 Adventure GS.

We each have different ideas of what is the best compromise and what sort of adventures we're optimizing to have. My idea of an adventure bike may be a lowered KLR, but I'll not say to the girl with the 1150 Adventure that her bike is too heavy. If it works for her, it's the right bike for her.

If we'd be honest here, we can always point out many deficiencies with our bikes. That is, until someone with a competing brand badmouths us and then we get all defensive claiming our bikes are the ones lacking flaws of any sort. Here in the real world where we can always improve what we have, there isn't any bike that is ideal or perfect.

Until we're all the same size, the same strength, the same aptitude and skill in riding, and headed for the same adventure, there will be no idea bike.

alyef 05-01-2005 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr.Grumpy
If it weighs TEN pounds less it will be more powerfull and lighter than a 650 V-strom. 50 pounds will still be 50 more than a 640 or KLR. What's the point of 50 pounds?

The KLR wet is about 400 lbs ( at less the one I owned was ). I think that Kawasaki distorts the numbers some. So, if you could get a dry weigh of 350 with a twin engine, it would probably be my next bike.

Fat Toney 05-01-2005 10:25 AM

well said

viverrid 05-01-2005 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alyef
.....I think that Kawasaki distorts the numbers some....

Its not just Kawi, and it may or may not be "distort". The explanation I read was that what is called "dry" starts out as the "design" weight, totalled, of each and every part or assembly on the bike. This theoretical weight can be established long before any such bike is actually shipped. Given long lead times for engineering and manufacturing setup, and that somebody from Marketing wants a figure to announce, they are given the "design" weight sum of each of the parts. Then this gets published and 'set in stone'.

But the actual off the production line total weight, never turns out to be the same as the theoretical weight, as everything that is not custom hand finished for a factory race project, ends up weighing a bit more here and there.

At least that's what "they" said.

alyef 05-01-2005 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by viverrid
But the actual off the production line total weight, never turns out to be the same as the theoretical weight, as everything that is not custom hand finished for a factory race project, ends up weighing a bit more here and there.

At least that's what "they" said.

I have never done a careful study of this, but it sure seems like they under estimate the weight and not over estimate it consistently. If what you say is true, there would be a good explaination for the consistent under estimation.

CCH 05-01-2005 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alyef
The KLR wet is about 400 lbs ( at less the one I owned was ). I think that Kawasaki distorts the numbers some. So, if you could get a dry weigh of 350 with a twin engine, it would probably be my next bike.

Another vote for a 350 lbs. twin cylinder, adventure type bike (not too dirt, not too street). Kind of what I wish Suzuki had done with the DL650 in the first place. That would be something useful.


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