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-   -   2 smoke DS's on pavement......? (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=821182)

MItrnsplnt 08-27-2012 10:44 AM

2 smoke DS's on pavement......?
 
Had a question for the masses....plan on buying a KTM 300 EXC or XWC and was wondering what the individuals with 2 stroke DS bikes do when they have to connect trails via pavement for 10-20 miles??? I know that there are a lot of people on here who ride 2 stroke bikes up in the mountains and have to do this....but was wondering how they preserve the life of the piston/rings (top end) when they have to use pavement to get to other places.....One guy just recently told me in CO that he'll pull the choke out on the pavement to give a richer mixture and lubricate the piston on pavement sections and not burn the rings out as quick, but wasn't sure if that was the case or accurate? What does everyone else do???:ear Thanks in advance for the advice!!

Twin-shocker 08-27-2012 01:55 PM

Pulling the choke out helps to stop bikes overheating when used at wide throttle openings on the road, and thus prevents motors seizing up. If you can just taking things a bit easier on the road is a much better idea, and will mean motors last longer.

WVhillbilly 08-27-2012 02:03 PM

I've had to do 10-20 miles of 2 lane a couple times on my 200 EXC.
Not much traffic here, so I just took it easy. 40-50 mph except for a couple times.

The off road tires weren't much fun either,

miguelitro 08-27-2012 03:35 PM

hitting the kill switch periodically works as well. on a 82 yz490 I had a cable rigged up to pull the choke for long flat baja dry lake bed crossings. pretty easy to do.
Mike

tHEtREV 08-28-2012 03:01 AM

I don't do anything.

I did a couple of hundred K on a highway to get home once...

She handled it without a problem.

But I'm going to look into the bar mounted choke lever.

FloridaSteve 08-28-2012 11:14 AM

Those bikes are very stoutly engineered especially compared to all the vintage stuff I ride. I don't see how this would be a problem. If you're concerned about holding a constant RPM for an extended period then don't. move it around a bit, hold the clutch in on looong downhill runs (a mile or more) and otherwise ride it like a normal motorcycle. Not sure what the mechanism is on the 300 but choking it will typically just get it way rich on a warmed up bike. I don't see how this will help if the bike is properly tuned jetted mapped whatever.

2 cents..

firecrotch 08-28-2012 04:22 PM

I gently roll the throttle on and off. Been fine for hundreds of miles now.

Twin-shocker 08-29-2012 12:33 AM

The reason why its not a good idea to ride dirt bikes flat out on the road for any length of time, is due to the cooling systems not being designed to get rid of the amount of heat this is likely to mean, which makes seizure a distinct possibility.

Forde 08-29-2012 12:36 AM

um, just dont ride it full throttle??

Shocktower 08-29-2012 04:24 PM

It is a water cooled bike, I am sure it is fine :evil

Sniper X 08-30-2012 07:57 AM

I have put thousands of miles on the pavement on MX bikes, enduros, and 2 stroke street bikes and never had a problem with ring wear. On 2 stroke MX bikes I do vary the throttle a little to both keep it from surging and keep the vibes to a minimum.

peter650 09-02-2012 01:02 PM

Just jet it, so it will run on the road.

Twin-shocker 09-02-2012 10:56 PM

Fitting bigger jets might stop a dirt bike seizing when its ridden on the road, but it wont alter the fact that the cooling system isnt designed to dissipate the amount of heat resulting from wide throttle openings for long periods of time.

peter650 09-03-2012 06:08 AM

I had a air cooled kx500 {in rd 400 frame} that i rode on the road all the time. I ran 2 head gaskets on it, so it would not ping, it never over heated.

tHEtREV 09-03-2012 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Twin-shocker (Post 19506890)
Fitting bigger jets might stop a dirt bike seizing when its ridden on the road, but it wont alter the fact that the cooling system isnt designed to dissipate the amount of heat resulting from wide throttle openings for long periods of time.


All my bikes get much hotter doing slow stuff than they do on the highway.

I have never overheated a bike on the highway, but I have on slow stuff and waiting in traffic, so I really don't see a problem with cooling.


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