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runnin4melife 11-04-2012 03:09 PM

Emergency firstaid for motorcyclist
 
If you are like myself and are often out on the trails far removed from a hospital or conventional medicine there are a few things that you can carry that can dramatically aid your return to civilization or ease your suffering until help arrives. Everything I will utilize can be sourced from your local pharmacy or ordered off the internet. This would be primarily geared towards fractures/burns/abrasions/puncture wounds all of which can occur in a rough trip down a trail.

My background: Medical student (DOD Medical school), Paramedic (military), I have taken numerous adv. trauma courses, and am providing the knowledge currently employed by the US military.

Enclosed is a picture of the kit that I carry with myself regardless of what type of riding I am doing. If I am going out with my panniers I may carry more but this is designed for the trails.

http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/...Motomedkit.jpg

A. Carrying case, I am using a military style cordura case
B. Compressed Gauze
C. Ace Bandage (5-6)
D. Medical Tape
E. Sam Splint
F. Emergency Thermal Blanket
G. LED Strobe Light, this is a great light to have, it is almost as strong as police strobes
H. Epi Pen, I am allergic to bees, thanks to a scorpion sting
I. Gerber Multi Tool
J. Medications, I carry acetaminophen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, and have two crushable iodine swipes in there
K. NATO Tourniquet
L. 2x2 Gauze
M. Band Aids
N. Alcohol Pads
O. Head Lamp

Introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjrm...Q&feature=plcp

Introduction to lower extremities: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETUU...k&feature=plcp

Lower extremity fracture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB9w...Y&feature=plcp

Lower extremity trauma: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j927u...ature=g-crec-u

guzzimike 11-04-2012 03:15 PM

:lurk
See my post under "The Custardline".

runnin4melife 11-04-2012 03:25 PM

Just read it, I had seen that you had a bad ride but not the full extent of it. This is exactly one of the issues I wish to address. Tomorrow I will make a short test video of this and post on youtube covering extremity wounds. You will be amazed what you can do with some simple things from the pharmacy and how you could have eased your suffering. Wish I would have done this sooner though :-(

I will not be able to illustrate how well these techniques work but suffice to say I have utilized them in real life and they are tremendously effective.

ebrabaek 11-04-2012 03:36 PM

Carbon Fiber band aid.... I'm in.......:freaky:freaky:clap:clap:D

runnin4melife 11-04-2012 04:34 PM

I was moved :rofl

GoGoGavin41 11-04-2012 07:36 PM

I've actually been saving up to put together several kits for bike/car/backpack. I have then been promptly spending the money on other things haha. This is something I'd be very interested in.

ridingAK 11-04-2012 07:41 PM

Very interested! :lurk

runnin4melife 11-05-2012 05:22 AM

Refer to the top post for my kit/videos. This is not professionally done or anything, I am doing it via my telephone and have no scripts so I apologize but it is great information. :deal

LuciferMutt 11-05-2012 06:05 AM

My wife who is a RNFA in the OR put together a kit for each of my motorcycles last year for my birthday. One thing she included that I think is a good idea is a supply of liquid bandage/dermabond/nu-skin/whatever they call it these days. Good for large abrasions. The only problem I have is that I stow them both under the seat...which means if I can't get to the bike, I can't get to the kit and that could be a problem. I might look into figuring out a way to carry them in a pouch on my person somehow, in some position where falling it on it would not break bones...

runnin4melife 11-05-2012 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuciferMutt (Post 19973047)
My wife who is a RNFA in the OR put together a kit for each of my motorcycles last year for my birthday. One thing she included that I think is a good idea is a supply of liquid bandage/dermabond/nu-skin/whatever they call it these days. Good for large abrasions. The only problem I have is that I stow them both under the seat...which means if I can't get to the bike, I can't get to the kit and that could be a problem. I might look into figuring out a way to carry them in a pouch on my person somehow, in some position where falling it on it would not break bones...

I have mixed feelings about that stuff, I would rather utilize a larger dressing w/a lot of bacitracin or any other antimicrobial ointment because the dermabond is analogous to superglue. It is hard to get off and often times creates a nice barrier in which bacteria can grow rampant under. In a pinch it is good for small wound closers etc... But I tend to shy away from it.

I hear you on the issue of the access to the kit. I have mine attached to the back of the bike but I carry one large ace wrap and a tourniquet on me and figure I can crawl to the bike to get the rest, and if I cannot, well I am probably screwed anyways.

Ronin ADV 11-05-2012 06:49 AM

A couple of recommendations.
Substitute coban (vet wrap) for some of those ace wraps. It's available at several locations including REI and is superior for most dressing applications.
Lots of folks get themselves onto trouble with tourniquets. In most cases, direct compression is superior to attempts at cutting blood supply. Handled improperly you can certainly do more damage with a tourniquet. And the sad reality is that if you sustain a large arterial injury and you are alone way out in the sticks, that is likely lethal anyway.
I also carry a skin stapler but that won't be easily available and requires a bit more training to use.
Lastly I also like the burn jelly REI sells as it is primarily Lidocaine and can act as an easily applied local anesthetic.

SloMo228 11-05-2012 06:58 AM

Your kit is pretty similar to what I carry. The compressed gauze is great stuff for a space-limited kit. One thing I do carry in addition is a packet of Quik-Clot. Never used it, but it's intended to accelerate the clotting process and has been used in combat situations for treating large wounds. I know there are mixed opinions on the stuff, and there is actually a possibility of burning yourself with it as the chemical reaction creates heat. But I figure it's better to stop heavy bleeding first and foremost, especially if you're not going to be able to expect medical assistance any time soon.

fuelish 11-05-2012 07:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WW Ronin (Post 19973330)
Lots of folks get themselves onto trouble with tourniquets. In most cases, direct compression is superior to attempts at cutting blood supply. Handled improperly you can certainly do more damage with a tourniquet.

When I took EMT training, tourniquet was an absolute last resort, the person would die from blood loss with out stopping the bleeding and the wound site was to big to compress. Like a leg torn off mid thigh, even then, pressure on the femoral artery would probably be better(assuming you were there in time).

runnin4melife 11-05-2012 07:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WW Ronin (Post 19973330)
A couple of recommendations.
Substitute coban (vet wrap) for some of those ace wraps. It's available at several locations including REI and is superior for most dressing applications.
Lots of folks get themselves onto trouble with tourniquets. In most cases, direct compression is superior to attempts at cutting blood supply. Handled improperly you can certainly do more damage with a tourniquet. And the sad reality is that if you sustain a large arterial injury and you are alone way out in the sticks, that is likely lethal anyway.
I also carry a skin stapler but that won't be easily available and requires a bit more training to use.
Lastly I also like the burn jelly REI sells as it is primarily Lidocaine and can act as an easily applied local anesthetic.

Coban has some utility but when looking at space and what is the most versatile the ace bandages are vastly superior because they have so many applications.

I am making a special video on tourniquet application. One of the huge disconnects between the civilian utilization and the military side is that we utilize tourniquets effectively everyday to staunch arterial flow. I cannot tell you how many times the arguments come up as they are essentially the antichrist in the world of civie EMS. But utilized properly they are life saving and you can make it out of the wilderness just fine.

I am staying away from any form of suture/stapling because of issues that can occur w/the application of those techniques, as well as the skill needed to effectively employ them. This series is designed to be low tech, but highly effective. The burn cream is a good idea, but the effects of the lidocaine will disappear really fast. For the space an antiseptic cream might be a better alternative, but if it is a 2+1 system then that is great. :evil

runnin4melife 11-05-2012 07:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SloMo228 (Post 19973400)
Your kit is pretty similar to what I carry. The compressed gauze is great stuff for a space-limited kit. One thing I do carry in addition is a packet of Quik-Clot. Never used it, but it's intended to accelerate the clotting process and has been used in combat situations for treating large wounds. I know there are mixed opinions on the stuff, and there is actually a possibility of burning yourself with it as the chemical reaction creates heat. But I figure it's better to stop heavy bleeding first and foremost, especially if you're not going to be able to expect medical assistance any time soon.


I also stay away from quickclot granules, they are exceptionally thermogenic and as you mentioned can lead to secondary injury due to the high heat generated. I have utilized these in real life and once applied you cannot maintain pressure unless utilizing a large roll of gauze to act as an insulator because it gets so hot it will burn you, and it has to exceptionally painful to the patient on top of causing secondary injury. A better alternative would be the new combat gauze, it is a gauze that is impregnated with a variety of clotting agents, this stuff works tremendously well. I can stop femoral bleeds with this and a few ace wraps. The key to any arterial bleed is to stop the flow and get a clot formed.


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