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-   -   Helicoil or TimeCert for valve covers? (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=843381)

pcwirepro 11-23-2012 06:10 PM

Helicoil or TimeCert for valve covers?
 
I need to do five of these things and wasn't sure if one was better than the other. It looks like the helicoil is actually a coil of steel whereas the timecert is an actual threaded barrel of sorts. ~$25 for the helicoil vs ~$60 for the timecert.
Any insight would much appreciated.

sno-where 11-23-2012 06:28 PM

Timecerts are better then Helicoil, but for a bolt that does not have to hold a lot of torque, you are probably just fine with the Helicoils. Anything that needs to hold more torque, I would rather trust a Timecert.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

hillbillypolack 11-23-2012 07:38 PM

I have Helicoils in one of the caliper mounts on my truck. It's low (ish) torque, at 28 ft / lbs. but has held well.

No experience with TimeSerts or the respective torque they will handle.

BluByU 11-23-2012 09:08 PM

I had to repair about 7 holes when i first got my old 1100GS (previous owner was a HACK.)

I used Heli-coils as that was what I had in the tool box at the time, never had a problem, nothing backed out.

Two valve cover bolts on one head and 3 on the other as well as two exhaust holes stripped.

Worked for me

pcwirepro 11-23-2012 09:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BluByU (Post 20106526)
I had to repair about 7 holes when i first got my old 1100GS (previous owner was a HACK.)

I used Heli-coils as that was what I had in the tool box at the time, never had a problem, nothing backed out.

Two valve cover bolts on one head and 3 on the other as well as two exhaust holes stripped.

Worked for me

Sweet. I can get them from Amazon pretty cheap.

LaurelPerryOnLand 11-23-2012 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sno-where (Post 20105635)
Timecerts are better then Helicoil, but for a bolt that does not have to hold a lot of torque, you are probably just fine with the Helicoils. Anything that needs to hold more torque, I would rather trust a Timecert.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

Nice demo video about TimeSerts:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gxnm8J9WXz8

pcwirepro 11-23-2012 10:00 PM

Good video
 
They both look like good options for the valve covers. My left side is currently blowing hot air/oil out the top.

Beezer 11-23-2012 10:08 PM

timecerts are not "better", only different. helicoils have been used on aircraft engines for new installation as well as certified repair for at least 60-70 years. I have 36 years as an aircraft mechanic... never seen a properly installed helicoil fail. to install a timesert you have to drill a bigger hole in the parent metal

pcwirepro 11-23-2012 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beezer (Post 20106785)
timecerts are not "better", only different. helicoils have been used on aircraft engines for new installation as well as certified repair for at least 60-70 years. I have 36 years as an aircraft mechanic... never seen a properly installed helicoil fail. to install a timesert you have to drill a bigger hole in the parent metal

Well then they're certainly good enough for my lowly valve covers. Do they require locktite to keep from backing out? I sure don't want to deal with them every time I adjust my valves.

Chat Lunatique 11-24-2012 04:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beezer (Post 20106785)
timecerts are not "better", only different. helicoils have been used on aircraft engines for new installation as well as certified repair for at least 60-70 years. I have 36 years as an aircraft mechanic... never seen a properly installed helicoil fail. to install a timesert you have to drill a bigger hole in the parent metal


35 years of tool and die making has let me replaces 1000's of threads that people have stripped. As Beezer says...Helicoil is the King.
But watch the video Laurel perry posted. There is a whole tool kit you need to install a Timesert $$$

IMHO
#1. Helicoil - strong threads and minimal toolkit
2. Keensert(self locking) - installs with a standard tap set. see link http://www.newmantools.com/kee.htm
3. Timset - Good but lotsa tools req'd

bemiiten 11-24-2012 07:00 AM

Another vote for Timesert. I was told you have to drill a smaller hole then a Heli Coil to install, so is a plus where there is not allot of extra material. Looks much better for a bolt that will see frequent removal as well because it locks in place. If you go for timesert, be sure to get the right length. You need around 5mm of depth past the Timesert to allow the installation tool to travel deep enough to lock the insert in place.

def 11-24-2012 09:20 AM

I used Helicoils when repairing the threads on old Brit bike cylinder heads. Never a failure. No special tools just a bit of care.

def 11-24-2012 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beezer (Post 20106785)
timecerts are not "better", only different. helicoils have been used on aircraft engines for new installation as well as certified repair for at least 60-70 years. I have 36 years as an aircraft mechanic... never seen a properly installed helicoil fail. to install a timesert you have to drill a bigger hole in the parent metal

Agreed. Always consider the advice of an aircraft mechanic. They repair and rebuild engines, airframes and other systems that lives depend on.

JimVonBaden 11-24-2012 12:10 PM

I've repaired dozens of valve cover threads with Helicoils, never an issue. It is simple, easy to do freehand, and holds the minimal 8nm of torque just fine.

I've used Helicoils on head studes and brake calipers with no issues as well.

Jim :brow

pcwirepro 11-24-2012 01:08 PM

Expensive kit
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JimVonBaden (Post 20109105)
I've repaired dozens of valve cover threads with Helicoils, never an issue. It is simple, easy to do freehand, and holds the minimal 8nm of torque just fine.

I've used Helicoils on head studes and brake calipers with no issues as well.

Jim :brow

The kit with tap, tool and 12 inserts is $40. Do I need the tool?


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