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-   -   Mikuni HSR42 (TM42-6) for sale. KTM LC4 applications (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=87425)

creeper 07-12-2005 11:02 PM

Mikuni HSR42 (TM42-6) for sale. KTM LC4 applications
 
The Carb is sold... thank you for playing our game. :wave


Got a Mikuni bangin' around the shop that I'll never use (Why?... Because I am a founding BST40 Cult member, that's why. :pope) so it's on the block.

Unless you count the 10 minutes it ran on my bike before my conscious kicked in... It’s new. Throttle cable bracket has been cut down for late KTM cables, but other than that, I haven't messed with it and it's as it came from Mikuni.
Oh yea... it's a polish/chrome version and worth over $600 retail. :D

Best offer over $300 takes it, shipped in the CONUS.

http://creeper.smugmug.com/photos/28165335-M.jpg

All interested parties can shoot me a PM.

Gwilli 07-12-2005 11:51 PM

Sssshhhwwwiiinnnggg.......... :0-0 :tb

dzrtracin 07-13-2005 06:56 AM

Creep
 
How about a little pro vs con theory compared to the BST40, PLEASE.

Gummee! 07-13-2005 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dzrtracin
How about a little pro vs con theory compared to the BST40, PLEASE.

Oh goody! Another religious argument!

:lurk

M

creeper 07-13-2005 08:35 AM

The carb is on it's way to Old Blighty...

Thanky,
Creep

dzrtracin 07-13-2005 08:49 AM

I asked
 
PLEASE. Creep im still curious for my OWN knowledge about that carb, sold or not. Im NOT looking to start any argument here, just your insight & knowledge.

creeper 07-13-2005 08:56 AM

OK, But it'll have to wait until tonight... got to go do my Hardly-Dangerous job. :D

dzrtracin 07-13-2005 09:04 AM

Thank You
 
Im sorry i just love to get feedback on any type of carb or motor mods. THANKS AGAIN

Shawn Milligan

gaspipe 07-13-2005 06:06 PM

That's a big carby Creeper. A 660 or a 700 would really eat good fed by that monster.

creeper 07-13-2005 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dzrtracin
How about a little pro vs con theory compared to the BST40, PLEASE.

You asked for it Shawn...

-Without going into excruciatingly painful and boring detail, there are three types of carburetors in common use. There is the fixed venturi, the variable venturi and the constant velocity.
-The fixed venturi is just as it sounds... a pronounced venturi with a disc or butterfly valve downstream on a rotating shaft. Once popular on Harleys and such, it isn't used much anymore. The most common to be found is the aftermarket S&S carb series for Harleys.

The variable venturi, slide type carburetor is represented by the current crop of high-performance and competition 4-stroke carburetors like the Mikuni HSR and TMR series and the Keihin FCR series.
The “size” of the venturi is established by the position of the slide, which in turn is controlled buy the operator’s right hand... and skill level.
The negative pressure or vacuum in the venturi area, and the volume of fuel drawn into it varies with the slide position, engine speed, load and elevation.
When used by an operator who understands the design, how to tune them correctly… and has the skill to benefit, a variable venturi carburetor offers near instantaneous throttle response.

Variable venturi carburetors require an accelerator pump to offset the loss in negative pressure or vacuum that occurs when the throttle is opened abruptly or at too low an RPM to maintain that vacuum.
The air in the column responds virtually immediately, but the fuel, having temporarily lost its high vacuum signal, takes a moment to catch up to the shift in pressure vs. area... an accelerator pump fills that "hicup" in fuel delivery.

The constant velocity carburetor, represented by our BST40 is, in very simple terms, a combination of a fixed and a variable venturi… to a point.
The operator has complete control over the butterfly valve downstream of the vacuum piston or slide, however… the piston itself is controlled not by the operator, but by the balance of pressure in the carburetor.
Negative pressure or vacuum, relayed via transfer ports in the bottom of the piston to the area above the vacuum piston’s operating diaphragm, and positive pressure beneath the diaphragm relayed via an atmospheric port, are what control the pistons movement and position.

An accelerator pump is not needed in a CV carb because in theory, velocity thru the venturi is held at a constant and high negative pressure. If there is no abrupt loss of that high vacuum signal, then fuel delivery to the venturi is also constant and determined only by jet and needle sizes... hence the name, constant velocity or CV.
The operator can send a pressure “signal” by closing or opening the throttle, but if the signal is inappropriate for the manifold pressure at the time, the vacuum piston serves to “dampen” the engines response to that signal while maintaining that all important high vacuum.
To put it another way, if the operator is unskilled at matching RPM, load and throttle position, the constant velocity carb will dampen his or her mistakes… to a degree.

The CV carb is actually more efficient than a variable venturi carb in the sense that it uses less fuel to produce a response, but due to the damping characteristics, that response may not be as quick to occur as some would like. In a performance application, the delay, no matter how short, is unacceptable.

Ciao,
Creep

Katoum 07-13-2005 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by creeper
You asked for it Shawn...

-Without going into excruciatingly painful and boring detail, there are three types of carburetors in common use. There is the fixed venturi, the variable venturi and the constant velocity.
-The fixed venturi is just as it sounds… a venturi with a disc or butterfly valve on a rotating shaft. Once popular on Harleys and such, it isn’t used much anymore. The most common to be found is the aftermarket S&S carb series for Harleys.

-The next, the variable venturi is represented by the current crop of high-performance and competition 4-stroke carburetors like the Mikuni HSR and TMR series and the Keihin FCR series.
-The “size” of the venturi is established by the position of the slide, which in turn is controlled buy the operator’s skill level. The negative pressure or vacuum in the venturi area, and the volume of fuel drawn into it varies with the slide position, engine speed, load and elevation.
-When used by an operator who understands the design, how to tune them correctly… and has the skill to benefit, a variable venturi carburetor offers near instantaneous throttle response.

-The first two carbs require an accelerator pump to offset the loss in negative pressure or vacuum that occurs when the throttle is opened abruptly or at too low an RPM to maintain that vacuum.
-The air in the column responds virtually immediately, but the fuel, having temporarily lost its high vacuum signal, takes a moment to catch up to the shift in pressure vs. area.

-The last, the constant velocity carburetor is, in very simple terms, a combination of a fixed and a variable venturi… to a point.
-The operator has complete control over the butterfly valve downstream of the vacuum piston or slide but… the piston itself is controlled not by the operator, but by the balance of pressure in the carburetor.
-Negative pressure or vacuum, relayed via transfer ports in the bottom of the piston to the area above the vacuum piston’s operating diaphragm, and positive pressure beneath the diaphragm relayed via an atmospheric port, are what control the pistons movement and position.
-An accelerator pump is not needed in a CV carb because in theory, velocity thru the venturi is held at a constant and high negative pressure. If there is no abrupt loss of that high vacuum signal, then fuel delivery to the venturi is also constant and determined only by jet and needle sizes.
-The operator can send a pressure “signal” by closing or opening the throttle, but if the signal is inappropriate for the manifold pressure at the time, the vacuum piston serves to “dampen” the engines response to that signal while maintaining that all important high vacuum signal.
-To put it another way, if the operator is unskilled at matching RPM, load and throttle position, the constant velocity carb will dampen his or her mistakes… to a degree.

-The CV carb is actually more efficient than a variable venturi carb in the sense that it uses less fuel to produce a response, but due to the damping characteristics, that response may not be as quick to occur as some would like. In a racing application, the delay, no matter how short, is unacceptable.

-There's lots of other stuff… but this should give you a pretty good picture of the differences.

Ciao,
Creep

Gees Creeper, my noodle is over cooked after reading this post. Did all this info come from the top of your head, if so I'm even more impressed. If there is some good reads on the subject could you please let me know. :ear If not I'm going to have this post framed for future reference. Thanks again.

creeper 07-13-2005 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Katoum
Gees Creeper, my noodle is over cooked after reading this post. Did all this info come from the top of your head, if so I'm even more impressed. If there is some good reads on the subject could you please let me know. :ear If not I'm going to have this post framed for future reference. Thanks again.

I hate to say it, 'cause it means my head is full of even more useless information than you could imagine, but yeah it's OTH.

It's just basic theory, elaborated on a bit. I don't think I could have written it shorter without losing some fundamentals... but if I was being paid by the word... :evil

There's probably lots of stuff on the net... just have to look for it, then sort out the crap from the academic. I've been working with this shit since the first carb style on the list was the only carb style there was.:lol3

Katoum 07-14-2005 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by creeper
I hate to say it, 'cause it means my head is full of even more useless information than you could imagine, but yeah it's OTH.

It's just basic theory, elaborated on a bit. I don't think I could have written it shorter without losing some fundamentals... but if I was being paid by the word... :evil

There's probably lots of stuff on the net... just have to look for it, then sort out the crap from the academic. I've been working with this shit since the first carb style on the list was the only carb style there was.:lol3

Have you considered hanging up the wrench for a pen. :lol3 You made a very complex subject understandable, even if some us don't fully comprehend all the principles you have enlighned us with the logic. Thanks for that.

creeper 07-14-2005 08:21 AM

You can be my agent... lemmy know when you have something. :lol3

dzrtracin 07-17-2005 06:10 PM

Thanks Creep
 
You are the KING!


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