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-   -   Ural owners- what do you mean by "Once it's sorted"? (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=884960)

madeouttaglass 05-06-2013 12:32 PM

Ural owners- what do you mean by "Once it's sorted"?
 
I've been the satisfied owner of a 2010 Gear Up for about 19,000 KMs now. Earlier today I read a post on Soviet Steeds where an older member said he thought that some of the long time owners might not be the best salesmen for people considering buying a brand new Ural. Maybe it's not exactly what he meant, but that was my take on it.
Anyway, it got me to thinking and I have to agree.
I'm looking for owners of 2009 and up bikes. It seems that whenever someone new asks about our bikes there has to be someone who says they are fun "once you get them sorted". I know that often that statement is made by a guy who knew guy who knew a person who had a problem. Other times it is an owner. It certainly infers that these machines are not for someone who doesn't do their own wrenching on a weekly basis. I do all my own work on my cars, trucks, and home, yet my rig has needed nothing but tires and oil changes. What issues have others had? If you are talking about rejetting, I think that applies to most new bikes no matter if they are carbed or fuel injected. The EPA pretty much makes all manufacturers sell their bikes at the lean end of the scale. Hell, I've had a few guys tell me how much better my other bikes would run with a $500 FI controller.
I'm hoping to shed a little light for everyone's sake. If there is still truth to this on the new bikes maybe the factory has to step things up in QC or train the dealers better in their set up of the rigs. Either way, I hate to see people that would otherwise be having fun with one be turned off by the (myth or fact) that owning one of these is a bit of a mechanical burden.
So Ural owners- what "sorting" did you have to do to make your 2009+ rig reliable or run right?
As I said before- Me- nothing at all.

seekeronsaltspring 05-06-2013 01:01 PM

1. Learned how to tigthen spokes Had a 2 wheel replace and a few spokes( nothing like the Dempsters for that.)
2. Speedometer gear replace three times. ( Untill I had a look see and found the drive shaft was eating it. 7 weeks wait for that part)
3, Carb blow off blending the valve and jamming it, torning the boot too, On starting a cold engine. Lucky I was standing beside it.
4, Rusted out rim. Replaced by Ural Canada
5, This year the clutch plates worn out.

All in all not bad for an 08 bought in 09, and all the trips I took while it was under warranty.

Prmurat 05-06-2013 01:10 PM

Sorted? is that a dirty word?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by madeouttaglass (Post 21344892)
I've been the satisfied owner of a 2010 Gear Up for about 19,000 KMs now. Earlier today I read a post on Soviet Steeds where an older member said he thought that some of the long time owners might not be the best salesmen for people considering buying a brand new Ural. Maybe it's not exactly what he meant, but that was my take on it.
Anyway, it got me to thinking and I have to agree.
I'm looking for owners of 2009 and up bikes. It seems that whenever someone new asks about our bikes there has to be someone who says they are fun "once you get them sorted". I know that often that statement is made by a guy who knew guy who knew a person who had a problem. Other times it is an owner. It certainly infers that these machines are not for someone who doesn't do their own wrenching on a weekly basis. I do all my own work on my cars, trucks, and home, yet my rig has needed nothing but tires and oil changes. What issues have others had? If you are talking about rejetting, I think that applies to most new bikes no matter if they are carbed or fuel injected. The EPA pretty much makes all manufacturers sell their bikes at the lean end of the scale. Hell, I've had a few guys tell me how much better my other bikes would run with a $500 FI controller.
I'm hoping to shed a little light for everyone's sake. If there is still truth to this on the new bikes maybe the factory has to step things up in QC or train the dealers better in their set up of the rigs. Either way, I hate to see people that would otherwise be having fun with one be turned off by the (myth or fact) that owning one of these is a bit of a mechanical burden.
So Ural owners- what "sorting" did you have to do to make your 2009+ rig reliable or run right?
As I said before- Me- nothing at all.

I have only 5000kms on my 2012 GU and I am trying to sort her... I keep on checking the oil level (s), air pressure (s), strange noises etc. Nothing, nada, rien... In the 1st 500 kms I changed twice the rear stop switch, the clutch arm was not "normal" and was swapped for a new one, a rear bulb got loose, some changes in the jets.needle.CA airbox (like any modern CA bike?) and that's it!! Very depressing: I was hoping to always have something to do, to look important with my newly acquired knowledge of problems and their solutions and it is denied to me!!!

Maybe the fact that it is coming from Triquest (and going back there for services) is the explanation: a well put together Ural is trouble free???:clap

JustKip 05-06-2013 07:23 PM

This guy, http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...postcount=1483 , who I know from outside Advrider, does all his own maintenance. He bought this second Ural knowing how much maintenance was required and actually looking forward to it.

He took his '12 GU to Blue Moon in/near Atlanta in Feb to have an output seal replaced under warranty.

This is his post on facebook from over 2 months later...

Up date: April 26th, 2013: The Ural actually made it (barely) to Stone Mountain from Blue Moon Cycle. A whooping 15 miles. The old flywheel was re-installed because the new flywheel didn't fit ( ...so, what exactly was the need to order a new flywheel ...?) Anyway, got on the rig, happily riding out the parking lot and heading for the first 2 miles when I could no longer shift the transmission into neutral. This problem worsened as the transmission got warmer. By the time I was home I only made in neutral 5 out of 10 times. This is in particular frustrating because the transmission shifted every bit as precise and consistent as my GS.

Sooooo, Blue Moon Cycle will pick up the rig tomorrow for another look over.

4 days later it was home and working well.

Obviously I left out the earlier stuff, but "Sorted out"? Sure looks like it needs it to me!
I've seen several people here and on the SS forum who have had ZERO problems with their post '07 rigs (and perhaps some earlier) but there are still brand new rigs that take some time and effort to get dialed in and running right.

Are they all junk? No...that's just stupid! I've seen a couple of those threads too, and they're generally somebody with an ax to grind. But the QC and reliability are clearly lower than most anything else on the market...even BMW's, with their FD failures and EWS immobilizer rings. You just don't have that kind of finicky set-up with any other vehicle.

BTW, I noticed that Ara (BeenerChef) also responded to his thread on facebook.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Prmurat (Post 21345154)
Maybe the fact that it is coming from Triquest (and going back there for services) is the explanation: a well put together Ural is trouble free???:clap

I think the dealer that sets the rig up initially has a lot to do with buyer's experience. I've heard nothing but great things about Ski and TriQuest!

vetsurginc 05-07-2013 08:06 AM

I'm running a 2011 GearUp (12500 km now) that I purchased new from Gene at Holopaw Corvette. He warned me that each one usually has at least one issue. With mine it turned out to be a bad rear brake light switch that stayed on. Caught that in the first mile. He replaced immediately.

His set up of the bike was perfect. Tracks hands-off (well hands light) straight on a flat road.

Found the drum of the spare was cast a little wide (rubbing interior of FD when I first put it on.) Removed 3 mm with a brake lathe (friend with a service station). No biggy.

Beyond that, get used to the noises, fuel, ride, change oil, set tappets, ride, change tire, ride....you get the idea:clap

By 5000km the engine was stronger and I didn't need so much throttle. At 10,000km better yet and mileage improved from 26-27 to 30-33 (depending on headwind and throttle hand). For someone used to modern engines that are RTG from the get-go waiting for the break-in may be trying and cause early disappointment.

I've been back at Gene's a couple of times (his training/500km service was the only "required" one and even that he said I could do myself). Mostly to get fairing, sidecar windshield). Getting used to the noises took the longest and still gets me sometimes. But everything works fine.

When I first looked at the bike Gene told me "think tractor and you've got the idea." Still works if I start thinking something is clunky :lol3

PS - my son says I like it because I can spend half my time riding and half "adjusting" thinks - he's not wrong!

planzman 05-07-2013 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by madeouttaglass (Post 21344892)
I've been the satisfied owner of a 2010 Gear Up for about 19,000 KMs now. Earlier today I read a post on Soviet Steeds where an older member said he thought that some of the long time owners might not be the best salesmen for people considering buying a brand new Ural. Maybe it's not exactly what he meant, but that was my take on it.
Anyway, it got me to thinking and I have to agree.
I'm looking for owners of 2009 and up bikes. It seems that whenever someone new asks about our bikes there has to be someone who says they are fun "once you get them sorted". I know that often that statement is made by a guy who knew guy who knew a person who had a problem. Other times it is an owner. It certainly infers that these machines are not for someone who doesn't do their own wrenching on a weekly basis. I do all my own work on my cars, trucks, and home, yet my rig has needed nothing but tires and oil changes. What issues have others had? If you are talking about rejetting, I think that applies to most new bikes no matter if they are carbed or fuel injected. The EPA pretty much makes all manufacturers sell their bikes at the lean end of the scale. Hell, I've had a few guys tell me how much better my other bikes would run with a $500 FI controller.
I'm hoping to shed a little light for everyone's sake. If there is still truth to this on the new bikes maybe the factory has to step things up in QC or train the dealers better in their set up of the rigs. Either way, I hate to see people that would otherwise be having fun with one be turned off by the (myth or fact) that owning one of these is a bit of a mechanical burden.
So Ural owners- what "sorting" did you have to do to make your 2009+ rig reliable or run right?
As I said before- Me- nothing at all.


you sir have a really nice bike. I am amused that we both have 2010 Desert camo bikes and mine is Orange and yours is Tan:freaky

As to being sorted out, my bike had two major failures in the first 200 miles suffered by the PO. One was a final drive lock up and the other was the rocker arm braking in half. After that, only the rubber doughnut and the rear brake light switch in the last 24,000 klicks. tires and oil excluded.:deal

on2wheels52 05-07-2013 07:06 PM

For myself, it was no worse than 'tuning in' a KLR. They're both fine the way they are, but it's easy to make improvements to the thing.
Mine had 2500 km when I bought it, don't remember the PO saying he had any warranty work done. But it's a much better machine now than when I first rode it.
Jim

Bar None 05-08-2013 07:17 AM

I don't think "Once it's sorted" applies to Urals. You ain't ever done and saying that is asking for bad luck.:rofl

Mikehusa 05-09-2013 08:52 PM

I had an ignition switch swapped out at my 500 km service. First few days vibrations were causing it to flicker my tail lights but by the time my service was needed it had stopped. Ural replaced it anyway. 3000kms, no other problems and I've ridden it hard off road. 2012 Yamal.

davebig 05-10-2013 05:38 AM

Hell, I think they(sidecar rigs) are all a work in progress !

redflasher 05-10-2013 07:41 AM

I guess my 2006 GearUP was "Factory sorted out". In 4 years of pretty heavy use I had 2 problems. Wonky stop light socket that I had to solder. Broken breather elbow which cost about $3 from the dealer. That's it. Legs and back started giving me problems during the maintenance . Sold it cause I wanted something freeway friendly. Should have kept it for putting around town but no garage space for it.

4PawsHacienda 05-11-2013 09:28 AM

I think it was mainly me that needed sorting! After half a lifetime riding semi-modern motorcycles I jumped on the Ural merry-go-round (no regrets) and went back in time (technology wise) 40 years so I've been sorting out my expectations - just like riding a "modern" Britt bike in the late 50's early 60's. You ain't never done.

UTE 05-11-2013 11:36 PM

1st 10,000K:

1) Alignment significantly out of spec (upon delivery).
2) Failed ignition switch.

In all fairness, I've owned several makes of bikes over the years. Each has had problems comparable to the URAL. Heck, my Kaw KLR650 was in the shop for two weeks during the first month of ownership.

Bill

dbigkahunna 05-12-2013 09:32 AM

My 2012 GU, Well sorted
 
I think a lot of responses are from old time Ural owners that owned the pre 06 and those made from 06 to 08. They did require sorting out. My 2012 has had one issue and that is the compliance fitting on the left side cracked. Silicone and duct tape kept the rig running until I could get to the dealer to get a new one. No Charge as it was under warranty. Replaced it myself.
Being a KLR owner I do not see the Ural being any harder to maintain and it is much easier to dial in. I adjusted the valves on the Ural at the 5K service interval. Just did the 10K and the valves are OK. I am a person that does not fiddle with things that are not broke. I am running stock jets, get 32-35 mpg, the engine does not use oil and keep the rear wheel rust proofed with sling off from the FD.
Is this rig perfect. Well yea. For me. Is it a get on it and ride. Well yea. But I check the fluids and tire pressure every time I ride. I guess some could look at that as being somewhat cumbersome, but not so much for me.
I think if you take the rig past 5K and start seeing the potential of what the engine becomes capable of your view of the rig will change. The difference is substantial. I would not have believed at 2k the performance change I have at 10k.
I am not a hard core dual sport rider but I am not afraid to get off the beaten path and so far the rig has taken me everywhere I want to go and gotten me back. I do not baby the thing. I just maintain it as per the manual and keep the fluids and pressures checked.
Mine is well sorted.

madeouttaglass 05-12-2013 11:18 AM

Thanks Kahunna, I agree with everything you just wrote. I did ask for responses from '09 and up but I think a few missed that part.


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