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-   -   Riding Standard vs Dual Sport (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949660)

Alcanfinforo 01-24-2014 01:44 PM

Riding Standard vs Dual Sport
 
Been reading quite a bit of threads in the ride reports forum (specifically those from US to South America) and I've noticed all rides are done in dual sports. The point of my reading is to plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750. Before you rip me a new one, it's not stripped, chopped, bobbed, or cafe racer style. My ride is as it came of the line in early 1976, last year I put 15k miles with no problems and regular (1500-2000 mile) oil change intervals.

Does anyone take long trips on Standard type motorcycles?

What are the huge advantages to riding dual sport? For those that have taken the trip down central america.

Am I being a fool for wanting to take such a trip on an old moto that is not exactly dual sport? Again, for those that haven taken the trip mentioned. I know that at least in Colombia the locals ride 125cc "standard" motos.

farmerstu 01-24-2014 01:59 PM

read rwd dougs ride reports.
contray to what some on here will say, you will have a blast. a different tool will still get the job done, sometimes more fun due to being different. go for it and don't forget to do a ride report.

welcome to the forum.

Roam 01-24-2014 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo (Post 23302909)
Been reading quite a bit of threads in the ride reports forum (specifically those from US to South America) and I've noticed all rides are done in dual sports. The point of my reading is to plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750. Before you rip me a new one, it's not stripped, chopped, bobbed, or cafe racer style. My ride is as it came of the line in early 1976, last year I put 15k miles with no problems and regular (1500-2000 mile) oil change intervals.

Does anyone take long trips on Standard type motorcycles?


Peter and Kay Forwood rode through every country in the world on a Harley Electraglide so I think you'd be fine on a standard. Unless you're trying to ride on dirt roads, 90% of your miles are going to be on pavement so 90% of the time you'll be glad your on a cb 750 and not a dual sport. Of course that other 10% of the time you might really really wish you were on a dual sport.

When I did my South America trip I met a young Aussie who had never owned a motorcycle before picking up a Yamaha 650 standard with Pennsylvania plates in Mexico and riding it down to Ushuai. He didn't seem to be any worse for wear for it.

merickk 01-24-2014 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo (Post 23302909)
Been reading quite a bit of threads in the ride reports forum (specifically those from US to South America) and I've noticed all rides are done in dual sports. The point of my reading is to plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750. Before you rip me a new one, it's not stripped, chopped, bobbed, or cafe racer style. My ride is as it came of the line in early 1976, last year I put 15k miles with no problems and regular (1500-2000 mile) oil change intervals.

Does anyone take long trips on Standard type motorcycles?

What are the huge advantages to riding dual sport? For those that have taken the trip down central america.

Am I being a fool for wanting to take such a trip on an old moto that is not exactly dual sport? Again, for those that haven taken the trip mentioned. I know that at least in Colombia the locals ride 125cc "standard" motos.

My first street bike was a 1974 CB 750. damn good bike, and it'll off road some too :lol3

Almost any bike can go say over the passes of CO, the difference is how much do you wanna work at it?

It all depends on where you want to go and how you want to get there.

falcofred 01-24-2014 03:28 PM

Read Jupiters Travels! Guy rode around the world on a standard Triumph! Not long ago all bikes started as standards. People then either chopped them, installed clip ons and rear sets, or installed Vetter fairings and luggage. Just get out and ride, make your own adventure!

lazeebum 01-24-2014 04:00 PM

I bought my klr because it was the closest thing to a standard that I was willing to pay for. Don't let what some keyboard commando writes get to you.

250senuf 01-24-2014 10:03 PM

Tires. The secret lies in what's hitting the road.

Have fun.

JohnCW 01-25-2014 01:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo (Post 23302909)
plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750.
Am I being a fool for wanting to take such a trip on an old moto that is not exactly dual sport? .

The only problem I could anticipate is sourcing spare parts if you has an out of the ordinary problem. However you better than anyone else would know how hard parts are to get. Take a selection of things likely to go wrong, but that's no different for even a new bike.

The CB750 is as comfortable a bike as any. I'd fit a large universal screen like the quick removal version of the National Cycle Deflector Screen, makes all the difference over the long miles.

Bucho 01-25-2014 07:47 AM

Go for it

Alcanfinforo 01-25-2014 08:36 AM

Thanks all for the vote of confidence, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. I'll be sure to read the suggested trip reports. There is a lot of good, no, great information on here.

Quote:

My first street bike was a 1974 CB 750. damn good bike, and it'll off road some too :lol3
I've taken mine off road a bit too, and who says CB's can't have knobbies, right!!


Quote:

Peter and Kay Forwood rode through every country in the world on a Harley Electraglide so I think you'd be fine on a standard. Unless you're trying to ride on dirt roads, 90% of your miles are going to be on pavement so 90% of the time you'll be glad your on a cb 750 and not a dual sport. Of course that other 10% of the time you might really really wish you were on a dual sport.
This is why I asked, most pictures are on paved roads and a few on hard packed (what we call) "gravel" roads. Detours on washouts and that seem to be packed down enough from heavy traffic. Mud is just part of the adventure.

Quote:

The only problem I could anticipate is sourcing spare parts if you has an out of the ordinary problem. However you better than anyone else would know how hard parts are to get. Take a selection of things likely to go wrong, but that's no different for even a new bike.

The CB750 is as comfortable a bike as any. I'd fit a large universal screen like the quick removal version of the National Cycle Deflector Screen, makes all the difference over the long miles.
Yes, clutch cable broke on me once last year and I was 800 miles from home. Camped out for a day before a farmer stopped and helped. He had a spare cable for a smaller honda that we made work on mine. I ended up finishing the season on that cable.

I have a small fairing, luggage rack and a crash bar that I intend on using. The fairing is small but helps a lot, might invest in the National Cycles screen, its slightly taller.

Grinnin 01-25-2014 09:05 AM

In 2012 I put about 6,000 miles on my mostly stock '75 CB750K, on two multi-thousand-mile, multi-state trips. I put about twice that on my dual-sport, a KLR 650.

The CB750 is a great motorcycle. The suspension is a bit harsh on unpaved roads. I have new fork tubes (Forking by Frank) but stock springs. When I got it in '09 the seat was lowered. I returned it to stock height but it's still lower than I'd like. When I broke a speedometer cable in Pennsylvania, I found a replacement at the first shop I tried. (It's not Central America, but it's all I can offer.) The CB750 is a compact hunk of metal -- it doesn't look as imposing as, for example, a WeeStrom 650. You may not match the displacement of the local bikes, but you won't be sitting up on some tall SUV either. The CB750 was important enough for Honda that they over-engineered it and that has paid off in very good reliability.

There are reasons I put about twice the mileage on my dual-sport. The suspension eats up holes on gravel or pavement and makes any road more comfortable. It has far more leg room than the CB750. It gets better fuel economy than the CB750 and carries more gas so the range is about double. For iffy traction standing on the CB750 is possible but not very comfortable --standing is far easier on a dual-sport.

I put hard luggage on my dual-sport, as a gravel-road tourer, but have soft bags on the CB750 which makes it just a little less convenient.

I don't do this to impress people, but people notice the CB750 and tell me about the one they had or say they're glad mine is still out on the road being used.

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f3...Misc/Crop3.jpg

ShaftEd 01-25-2014 09:12 AM

There's an old saying that the best bike for a trip, is the one in your garage.:deal:1drink

Maggot12 01-25-2014 09:19 AM

Ride whatever you want... who are we to judge. As long as the bike is reliable and I had enough faith in it to make the trek. I'd prep as needed and go.

Alcanfinforo 01-25-2014 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grinnin (Post 23307895)
There are reasons I put about twice the mileage on my dual-sport. The suspension eats up holes on gravel or pavement and makes any road more comfortable. It has far more leg room than the CB750. It gets better fuel economy than the CB750 and carries more gas so the range is about double. For iffy traction standing on the CB750 is possible but not very comfortable --standing is far easier on a dual-sport.

How tall are you? I'm 6'4" and put taller handlebars on mine to ride more comfortably. So I lied, the moto is not "as it came off the line in 76" like I said previously. Gas range is also a concern, thinking about changing up the gears to get better range, and take a spare gas can. Current conservative riding gets me 170-200 miles on one tank.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grinnin (Post 23307895)
I don't do this to impress people, but people notice the CB750 and tell me about the one they had or say they're glad mine is still out on the road being used.

I get this all the time too, have met some very interesting people.

Grinnin 01-25-2014 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo (Post 23308203)
How tall are you? I'm 6'4" and put taller handlebars . . .

I'm 5'9" with slightly longer legs and arms and shorter torso. I put on shorter bars for a slightly sporty posture. I ride without windshields so I need forward lean.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo (Post 23308203)
Gas range is also a concern, thinking about changing up the gears to get better range, and take a spare gas can. Current conservative riding gets me 170-200 miles on one tank.

The only way I know to get good economy from this engine is to slow down. The coefficient of drag is so bad that I'm not sure that revs are significant. Give it a try, though. Perhaps your small fairing will help and perhaps my big bags hurt my mileage. I made those bags for a large synthetic sleeping bag on a short bike which means they stick out a bit.


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