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Old 08-26-2005, 10:28 AM   #3
yater OP
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Joined: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Oddometer: 8,517
Many of these gravel roads cross indian reservations and are relabled "BIA" (bureau of indian affairs) roads...I'll say that my delorme atlas was absolutely worthless when it came to road marking--it was wrong about 90% of the time but I could follow my intented route with a compass, reference point (mountains), and a little common sense...no gps on this trip. Some of the villages on these remote bia roads were nothing more than a few trailers and a post office, surrounded by reservation with 40+ miles of gravel to the nearest civilization. It seems like there are 2 dogs to each resident, therefore I was unable to get pictures

I was naive in thinking Ancho would provide a cold drink and possibly fuel...the town consisted of the "house of old things" museum,a few deserted buildings, and a railroad.

Ancho


the railroad


After crossing the railroad, I was in for the longest pavement stretch of the trip...highway 55 up to mountain air was a long straight stretch with a few opportunities to veer off onto county roads that parrallel the pavement. These gravel stretches were full throttle wide open for miles. The dr350 is NOT the ideal bike for long hauls on pavement but I found her sweet spot and made it work. Slide, on advrider, mentioned the gran quivira ruins and I blazed by a sign that I thought I recognized...so I whipped it around to check things out



I discovered that the gran quivira ruins were only 1 mile south of my location and had to stop...it was a welcome break from the drone of my 606s!

From what I understand, gran quivira served as a trading post for many of the pueblo tribes dating back to about 1300ce. Their vantage point from this hilltop is amazing




This may have been some kind of grain storage. The water trap was located down hill... a huge levee to pool the runoff.




I was most impressed by the church. Construction is said to have commenced in the mid 1600s and was abruptly halted in about 1670...I'm not sure why. This would not be the last (or the most complete) of the pueblo churches I would find.




yater screwed with this post 08-26-2005 at 11:41 AM
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