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Old 11-16-2012, 07:06 AM   #26
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Daniel R.
 
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Joined: Oct 2012
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The other thing that helped me score jobs – especially better paid jobs – was the internet. Of course, extensive networking was only possible because of the internet, but the opportunities to work over the internet was a real blessing. I acknowledged, that I could easily and without signing any paperwork, work on a rice field for as long as I wanted. And this would feed me. But this would not provide any chances of saving up some money which could then be used to travel any further. So, working was possible in all kinds of countries, but not very helpful in terms of making progress with my journey. Working over the internet, building websites for example was a great way of earning a decent amount of cash. However, it wasn't as easy as it might seem. Nobody would ever hire me before he/she has met me. I think this is a trust thing and very human. So only clients that I have met in person and ideally worked for before, would not mind trusting me with a job despite the fact that I was sitting in a hammock on a beach with a straw hat on. Well, often they didn't know any details about my current office, only that I was halfway around the world in a foreign place. All in all I loved it, although I never was successful enough to make any excess money so I could maybe update serious parts of my equipment. But that was ok, I loved the lifestyle and the freedom that came with it was way more important the feeling of security. I even managed to pay for this trip through China. As I was writing about before, Tibet was one of the highlights on my journey. But also a proper challenge.








So… On Christmas eve I rode from Kathmandu to the border with China. The big bright-red truck and the camper-van were already waiting there. It was late at night and nobody was on the streets anymore. Only a couple of homeless kids that made themselves a fire with the plastic rubbish that was lying on the streets. The border-town is very small, only a few lights lit the one street which led straight to an iron gate with the Chinese flag on it. There were a bunch of trucks lined up, waiting to cross in the morning. I was lucky to find a place to stay for the night. A lady let me stay in a run-down guesthouse and even prepped some instant noodles for me. The interior lights of the big bright-red truck and the camper-van was already off, so I would not meet my fellow travellers until the next morning. I gave the homeless kids some cookies and snacks in exchange for a huge smile. What a Christmas eve! Pretty awful if I look at it now. But back then I was filled with so much excitement and positive anticipation about what was to come and what I was going to see in Tibet, that this didn't feel anything short of a proper Christmas eve with family and friends. The border crossing the next… well, wasn't as expected. But more soon….
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