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Old 04-04-2013, 10:36 AM   #62
camitzi OP
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Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Vancouver BC
Oddometer: 90
Santiago to Bariloche

We left our new friends in Santiago and we headed south again, as we have a mission: we have to get to Ushuaia*before it snows.

The road south was beautiful, some paved and some really loose gravel for about 50 km. I think it was the loosest gravel I have ever done so far. It looked like someone just dumped trucks of rocks and pebbles on the road. And to top it off, there were up and down sections. As I did not know for how long we were going on the gravel and how bad it was going to be, I did not turn my ABS off. On one of the down sections there were tight turns as well, so I tried to slow down and feather the brakes, but my bike's ABS is very sensitive and it kicked in, so my bike actually started speeding up big time. I was almost sure I was going to fall on that loose gravel, going down and taking a turn at that speed. But I was lucky and I managed to control it, so no crashes But now I make sure I turn off my ABS every time we hit gravel.

On the side of the road there were plenty of blackberries (as they have no bears here), so I could not resist to stop and have some, straight from the source.

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As lodging is more expensive in Chile and Argentina, we decided to camp for a few days. So we started to look for a place to camp. After a few attempts on some dirt side roads, where all we found was private properties, we turned back to the highway. And when we were about to give up and go to a hotel, we saw a camping sign. Decent, nice and green, showers, it even had a pool that we never got to use, as we left early next day. For $8 USD per person it was ok, especially that we were the only people in the campsite, so it was very nice and quiet.

Next day more highway and gravel roads were waiting for us, with the majestic view of*snow-capped*volcanoes.

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We stopped for lunch in the beautiful town Villarica, on the shore of Villarica Lake. Very touristic town, with high prices. But this does not take away from its beauty created especially by the beautiful architecture with a lot of Swiss and German influence and the view of the Villarica Volcano. After lunch we kept going and we stopped for the day a little bit further, still by the Villarica Lake, in Pucon. Pucon looks very much like Villarica, it looks just as touristy, and the prices at least just as high. An average hotel room goes for around $100 USD. We found a decent campsite, set the tent and opened a bottle of wine. But as we should have known better, Latino people like to party, so all night long we could hear people singing and laughing. Promised ourselves next time to camp in the wild.

Next day we headed for the border. This border crossing was somewhere in the mountains, where there was only a small gravel road so we were not expecting it to be busy. And it wasn't too busy. But that doesn't mean it was fast and easy. Again it surprised us that the border between two more civilized countries is so difficult. We have crossed about 14 borders so far and each one has the same routine: immigration - stamp in the passport, then Aduana, temporary import permit for the bikes. When we leave the country: immigration - exit stamp in the passport and then cancellation of the import permit for the bikes. Here the immigration was not a problem, it went fast. Then we went to Aduana. I went to one officer, while Vasile went to another. I presented my import permit for the bike to have it cancelled, they kept one copy and gave me two copies back, telling me I would need them when entering Argentina. When Vasile*was done, he had no copies. "Where are your copies?" "Well, he told me I didn't need any, and he kept them all" "No, you need two of them, let's go ask". Border officer "No, you don't need them, I keep them" "Then why did they give me two copies?" After a little chat between them, Vasile gets his copies too. From there we had to ride about 1 km on gravel to the Argentinian border. We got there, of course they asked for those copies. We presented them, but guess what: Vasile*was missing a stamp on them (one of the FIVE stamps they put on them). I had the stamp on my copies, but Vasile did not have it. "Well, I cannot let you enter Argentina without that exit stamp on the import permit. According to this paper, your bike is still in Chile". So Vasile jumped on the bike and rode back to the Argentinian border. He got there just to be told that he didn't not need any more stamps, so they refused to put the stamp. Those who know Vasile, you probably know that tact is not his forte, and when he gets pissed off he becomes quite direct. I do not know in what language he talked to them, but he pretty much told them "I don't care if I need the stamp or not, but the Argentinian border requires it, so you put the damn stamp on my paper now so I can leave". So he got the stamp and came back to the Argentinian border. This whole time, I was arguing with the Argentinian officer at the Aduana, as she took my Chilean import permit, cancelled it (as she should have) but didn't give me a new one for Argentina. When I asked her, she told me I didn't need one. I started explaining to her that in each and every one of the countries we have been through we always needed one, and we need to present it when we leave the country, so we don't have problems. She kept insisting that in Argentina we didn't need one. I told her that this was the second time we entered Argentina, and the first time they did give us one. "So where is it then if they gave you one?" "Well, I had to cancel it, so I left it with them when I left Argentina" "Then we can't give you a new one, you don't need one" I was getting really frustrated, as I knew for sure I needed one and I could not enter Argentina without it, but I was having a really hard time convincing her. Actually she should have been the one convincing me that I needed one, since she should have known better than me what I needed when I entered their country. After 15 minutes of arguing, one of her colleagues overheard our conversation and he intervened, telling her that she did need to fill out a temporary import permit, as we were foreigners, and it was mandatory. Finally! So here I was when Vasile came back. I was so happy that I could speak Spanish! Imagine a tourist who does not speak the language, and does not know all the ins and outs of the border crossings, they would have just taken her word and left without the paper. And chances are they wouldn't have been able to leave the country with the vehicle anymore, or they would have had problems for sure.

Funny enough, once outside, the guy who usually does a final check of all the papers before you enter the country, did ask for the import permit. So how the heck that lady knew nothing about it?

So here we were once again in Argentina.

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We continued for a while on gravel road, very dusty from the busy traffic, leaving behind the beautiful volcanoes.

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And we entered the famous Ruta 40. We stopped to rest our bones in a campsite by the highway again, by a beautiful lake.

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And one more time we witnessed the cheerful Latino party spirit all night long

Ruta 40 is an epic road. There are long stretches not paved yet here and there, but I am sure in one year it will be all paved, as they are working on that now. We rode by 7 Lakes, which is a wonderful region in the mountains that has, as the name says, 7 incredible lakes, one more amazing than the other.

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For lunch we stopped and had the best lamb goulash ever in a very chic rustic place and got some road advice from the owner.

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And we made it to Bariloche, the famous ski resort with beautiful Swiss architecture in the foothills of the Andes. For kilometers all we saw was hotels, cabanas, bungalows and restaurants, which told us how touristic it is. We inquired at a "hosteria familial" which was supposed to be cheaper, how much they would charge per night. Answer: only $100 USD. So we camped again. It looks like here in the south*is more rainy and a lot colder, so camping is not just as much fun as it is on the beach, but for now it is ok. I have a feeling I will miss the sun and heat for a while.
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