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Old 04-04-2013, 12:22 PM   #66
camitzi OP
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Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Vancouver BC
Oddometer: 94
The ride through the great nothingness

When we left Ushuaia it was 2 degrees C and pouring. I decided to put my GoreTex gloves, even though they were really bulky and I could barely reach the clutch and throttle with them. It was so cold I was looking at the temperature display on my bike all the time hoping that I would see an increase. We decided to ride as far as we could that day to get out of the rain and cold. So we did 300 km of paved rod to the border, crossed the border into Chile, then 160 km of gravel and mud road, took the ferry and crossed the Strait of Magellan north this time, crossed the border back into Argentina, another 100 km (approx) of paved road, and in Rio Gallegos we decided to call it a day. The whole ride was in horrible conditions. It was dumping on us, the temperature did not go higher than 4 degrees C and because of the rain the gravel road was even worse. It was all potholes everywhere and where there were not potholes, there were deep washboards. In normal conditions, the road with potholes is my favourite type of gravel road. I love to stand up on my pegs and feel the bike going up and down. But when you have to do that for so many km, it's no longer fun. My bike is a good bike, but the suspension on it is not the best. My tiny wrists were hurting so bad, I almost felt like crying. And on top of it the winds were getting stronger and stronger. When we saw the paved road ahead, both Vasile and I were happier than if we won the lottery. That day we did 560 km in total, paved and gravel, took a ferry and crossed two borders, all in the pouring rain and heavy winds.

We were warned by another fellow rider from Spain that Rio Gallegos was going to be expensive. And he was right. For a little town in the middle of nowhere, the price was higher than we've ever paid in the very touristy places. And again, I guess the prices for gringos kicked in. When Vasile went into the hotel (it looked like a family business) he was given two different prices by the father and the son. I guess the price given by the son was the regular price, and one given by the father was the price for us. While we were unloading our stuff from the bike, they must have talked to each other, as suddenly the correct price was the higher one for us. As we were tired and cold and we had a tough day (probably the toughest in the whole trip) we took it, but the room conditions did not justify the price at all.

The next 4 days was just another long ride in the rain with nothing to see around but this.

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The only thing that was keeping me from falling asleep were the strong winds. Now these were the kind of winds we were actually expecting in Patagonia. So far we kept thinking that we got lucky and the winds were not that strong (at least not as we were expecting them to be after all the stories we've heard), but this time we felt the full Patagonian winds. Luckily at times they were blowing from behind, and that was actually helping us with the gas consumption. It was flat, rainy (never in my life have I traveled for such a long distance without changing the weather or the landscape), windy and freaking boring. We started doing shorter days (500 km, after two days of 700 km each) as we could not handle the boredom of such long rides anymore. After four days of riding we were stoked to see the first tree! And the only exciting thing along the way was the view of the Atlantic Ocean.

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As we got close to Buenos Aires it got a bit warmer though and we started to see some vegetation and a lot of farms. The traffic also started to change, becoming a bit *more aggressive. But it was still way better than the traffic in any central american countries or any countries in the northern part of South America.

As we got to the city, the traffic got pretty jammed, as we were expecting in a capital city. But the city is beautiful; very nice old buildings, built with good taste, proof that a lot of artists were involved in it.

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And here is the oldest Cafe in Argentina.

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We decided to stay there for a few days as our bikes needed some maintenance.

One day we celebrated Saint Patrick's day. It looks like here they celebrate it even more than they do it in Ireland

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And then it was work time. My BMW was due for a general*maintenance, plus we had to replace the sub-frame. Vasile went to the BMW dealer and picked up a new sub-frame and new steering column bearing (the beemer had steering problems since Baja Mexico, that we thought we fixed, but it wasn't fixed 100%). The two parts were somewhere over $300 USD. He also asked BMW if he could work in their shop, but the answer was negative. So far KTM rocked (Vasile had to mention that to me several times and I had to admit it), they always let Vasile work in their shops, and made their tools available to him at no charge. So then Vasile went to the parking lot where we parked the bikes over night (public parking) and changed the sub-frame and replaced the steering column bearing right there.

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The next day Vasile went to KTM to buy oil for his bike, but as it was Saturday, their mechanic shop was closed and the guy there could not find the keys to let him in so he could work on the bike, so Vasile had to find a different option. And he found this Yamaha dealer, and the guy there was more than excited to let him work in his shop. They were so excited talking about bikes, that they didn't even introduced each other. The only identity of him that we have is his facebook name, Polaco. So that's what we are going to call him here.

Vasile did the oil change on the KTM and*oil change and valve adjustment on the BMW. Polaco offered him all the tools that he needed for that, and he even offered his help. Him and his team were just incredibly nice and helpful. At the end Vasile wanted to compensate him for all the help, but he didn't accept anything. Another proof of Argentinian hospitality. Thank you Polaco &co.

So if you are in Buenos Aires and you need some help, there is no better place to go (it is on Av. del Libertador Gral San Martin,in Vicente Lopez)

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Now after a face lift, my bike feels really nice and smooth, I can actually enjoy the ride again

After a few rest days in Buenos Aires we decided to take the ferry to Colonia, Uruguay. The other option was to ride around the water, about 870 km to get to the same place on bikes. As we were afraid that it would be just as flat and boring, we preferred to take the ferry. In one hour we got to Colonia. But about that, in a new post. Stay tuned.
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