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Old 10-25-2013, 08:02 PM   #55
lnewqban
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Joined: Jan 2012
Location: Florida
Oddometer: 291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beendog View Post
Thanks guys, wasn't aware the front had more traction with less weight on it, I would think it's the opposite(like the rear tire is more weight=more traction). Shows how counter-intuitive some of this stuff really is.
It is not exactly as you describe it, ............. and that misconception can be dangerous.
Here is why:
When the bike is turning, it leans because there are lateral forces as well as vertical forces on the contact patch of each tire (and the lean counteracts those).
The vertical forces are the only ones that contribute to grip or traction: the more vertical force the greater the resistance of the tire to side-slide or skid (more traction).

Available traction is able to withstand a lateral force of about 90% of the vertical force for dry asphalt, about 60% on dry concrete and about 25% on wet asphalt.

Those vertical forces come from the weight on the tire, which can be reduced or increased on each by acceleration (more on rear than front) and braking (more on front that rear).

That is great for accelerating and braking with the bike in a vertical position: for each case, the weight naturally transfers over the tire than needs more traction or grip.

The problem while the bike is leaned is that the explained transfer of weight caused by inertia, also increases the lateral force on each contact patch (more for more lean angle).

Keeping the recommended moderate acceleration during a turn, discharges the front contact patch some from both forces (vertical and horizontal) and puts that load on the rear contact patch, which is bigger and has higher capacity for that load.
As a bonus, the suspension re-adjusts to achieve the best stability and ground clearance during the turn.

If you will be riding on asphalt and in traffic, I highly recommend you reading this book:

"Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well" by David L. Hough

You can find it in your local public library or buy it from here:
http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Mot.../dp/1889540536

In the meanwhile, you can read good information here:
http://www.sportrider.com/motorcycle_riding/techniques/








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