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Old 10-27-2013, 09:34 PM   #5
M1Jeep
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Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Lakewood, CA
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Copied and pasted from Keith, aka airborndad...



Heres a repost of something I put together a few years ago
HOPEFULLY this is all just a big waste of computerized electrons and NONE of it will be needed:

I know it's too much info but if it jogs ANYONES memory and anyone remembers even 5% of it then any potential patient's will be better off

Rescue plan

For EMERGENCY life threatening situations ONLY

1. Activate SPOT 911 button
2. Start the ABCC's Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Cevical Spine Immobilization (More Details to follow in Basic Guidelines Below)
3. Send the 2 best riders that know where they are going to go Call 911 AND /OR contact any Ranger after they have contacted and or called 911 those riders will head back to PSR to get a vehicle to retrieve the downed riders Motorcycle


For NON life threatening situations
those will be handled be the riding group
do not use the SPOT Help button unless absolutely necessary as a last resort
best practice would be to send 2 or 3 riders back to PSR to obtain any parts needed or a vehicle to retrieve the broken motorcycle and or hurt rider
____________________________________

Basic Guidelines

Keep (or at least sound) calm and it will reduce the panic of everyone else present.
In an emergency situation, psychological management is important. If a central person takes charge and is remaining calm, this will transfer to all of the other people on the scene and will help the victim far more than if everyone is overly excited and pumped with adrenaline. Take two deep breaths when you feel yourself losing it.
Get to victim, reassure, establish communication
After a person has gone down, they will be in a confused and scared state.
It is important to reassure them and to make sure they will not try to move or get to their bike.
Try something like, "You've been in a motorcycle accident. It is very important that you do not try to move. My name is (whatever your name is) '' Tell them that help is coming
Be careful what you say around the victim, even if they are unconscious. Hearing works even in the unconscious state if you say , "Damn, look at that bone sticking out! I don't think this looks very good for him at all '', it's going to register at some level with them and can do nothing but harm.

Safety factors



It is important to keep safety in mind; if you are helping someone lying in the middle of the road
* get someone up the road and down the road to wave down traffic. especially important in corners where other riders or cars may not have time to stop

* The person with the most training (first aid, CPR, etc.) attends directly to the victim. Assuming the victim is lying on the ground, have someone sit behind their head and should stabilize his or her head to avoid unnecessary movement (i.e. hold their head still). Assume the person has a back/neck injury and any unnecessary movement could risk paralysis.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________
Start doing "ABCC'' at the arrival on the scene and every 5 minutes thereafter



A Airway
* Is there something to impede their airway? Gravel in the helmet, something down the throat? Gum? ,Candy? This needs to be cleared immediately, without helmet removal if at all possible.
B Breathing
* Is the person breathing? Place the side of your face just above the victim's mouth, looking down along their chest. Look for movement of the chest, feel and listen for breathing. Do this for up to 10 seconds.

If the Emergency Services have not been called, send a bystander to call 911. Make sure they know the exact location of the accident and can tell the 911 Operator if the victim's is conscious or unconscious, breathing or not breathing.
C Circulation
* Check the pulse on the throat initially and subsequently on their wrist. This is the carotid artery, right next to the wind pipe/Adam's apple on either side. If pulse is not present, remove helmet if necessary and begin CPR immediately. When checking pulse on their wrist, do not check with thumb; use the two fingers next to the thumb.
C Cervical Spine Immobilization
* Support the victim's head and make sure they don't move it. CONSIDER EVERY MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT A HEAD INJURY, CONSIDER EVERY MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT A CERVICAL/BACK INJURY! This is important even if they feel they can move their head normally! When you talk to the victim initially, add on a short bit to reassure them;
"You've been in a motorcycle accident. It is important that you don't move. My name is (whatever your name is) . make sure you Answer me without moving your head. We don't know if you have a neck injury or not. help is on the way.''
Again, make sure that the victim does not move at all, their head or any other part.

The three questions


Ask the victim three questions and document their responses;
* * What is your name?
* Where are you?
* What day of the week is it?

If breathing is taking place normally, LEAVE HELMET ON!

If you have a rider down and not moving, but he is breathing or is alert and oriented but doesn't want to move. , Don't remove the helmet. However, if the helmet is to remain on the rider and you are maintaining C-spine. You MUST elevate the shoulders. The helmet will raise the head and can obstruct the airway due to positioning or even cause further damage to the C-spine by causing misalignment. a jacket folded over a few times is just the right thickness to accommodate the thickness of the helmet.

It is very dangerous to remove someone's helmet if they have some type of cervical/back injury. The only time it should be removed is if the airway is blocked and cannot be cleared with the helmet on or if it is necessary to perform CPR.
After initial evaluation of seriousness of injuries, call 911, After there has been a quick evaluation of the number of injured people and just the most preliminary guess of seriousness, someone has to be sent to get an ambulance. Remember that an ambulance can only support one truly injured person.
It is important to remember that a lot of the injuries that don't look serious to us could very well be life-threatening and injuries that look fatal are relatively minor. If you can't tell, assume it's Urgent!
Send two bikes to the nearest ranger or business tell them "There has been an accident. Please call 911.'' (it is important to let the 911 dispatcher know that it was a motorcycle accident, however). It is less threatening to ask to call 911 than it is to ask to come in and use their phone.



Things to tell 911 dispatcher
** there has been a motorcycle accident
* need an ambulance
* the # of injured people (and how badly injured they are). A severely traumatized person will require an entire ambulance to themselves, so it is important to give the EMS dispatcher some idea of the scope of the accident. If they only send one ambulance and there are two people who need one immediately, it will be a problem.
* location of accident
You (the caller) hangs up last!
The 911 dispatchers are well-trained and will get all the information they need from you before hanging up. Stay on the line until they do.

Things that may be necessary for victim
It is helpful if you know some special equipment is going to be necessary to tell the dispatcher;



Helicopter
* Most rural areas cannot handle severe trauma and they may need to get the victim to a trauma center via helicopter. If they know there may be a need, they can get the helicopter ready to leave for the rural hospital when a doctor establishes the extent of the injuries.
Document personal information if possible (victim may pass out)


Before professional help arrives, if possible, document information about the victim. They may become unconscious and it will be helpful to have information like
* * ask their Full name
* Age, date of birth
* emergency contact name & number(s) ask if there is someone that they would like you to contact for them
* Doctor

AMPLE documentation
the way to remember this is to remember that "There is AMPLE time to document this before the help arrives.'' Again, this will be very helpful to the paramedics if the victim passes out.
A Are you Allergic to anything?
M Are you on any Medications? Street drugs? Alcohol? (when last taken? & how much?)
P What's your Past medical history?
L Last meal - when did you eat last? (will help anesthesiologist if one is necessary)

E What were the Events leading up to the injury?
* If the doctors and paramedics have some idea how accident occurred, it will give them better ideas on what kind of injuries to look for. Did the person low-side and slide for a while on one of their sides? Did they go over the bars? Did they head-butt a solid object, such as a rock? If they went over the bars, is there any obvious damage to the tank / handlebars which might indicate they hit the lower abdomen/groin area? This kind of stuff could help the doctors/paramedics.
Check pulse every 5 minutes & document it
Every 5 minutes the pulse should be checked at the wrist. If the pulse goes away at the wrist, check at the throat. This is a late sign of shock
Write down the number of beats per minute and the time you took the measurement.
Check breathing every 5 minutes & document it
Just like the pulse, check number of breaths per minute, the most reliable method being by placing your hand on the person's chest.
Try to check their breathing rate without their knowing it. If they know you are counting their respirations, they may unconsciously alter their breathing rate.
Record this number along with the pulse every 5 minutes. Also note the type of breathing; fast, shallow, gurgling, labored, easy, whatever.
Even in layman's terms it may be useful to the paramedics.
Watch for signs of person going into shock


Signs of shock:
** Inability to answer the 3 questions coherently* What is your name?
* Where are you?
* What day of the week is it?

Pale, cool, clammy skin
Delayed capillary refill press a fingernail so that it turns white. It should turn back to pink in less than 2 seconds. If it takes longer, that is not a good sign.
Radial pulse (pulse at the wrist) goes away but there is still a pulse on the neck

There isn't much you can do once someone starts going into shock, but a few minor things that may help:
** Assure adequate breathing. This really comes with the AB of ABCC.
* Loosen restrictive clothing.
* Reassure victim.
* Keep the person warm (not too hot though).
* Elevate the feet ~6 in.
This is actually a judgment call since you shouldn't really do that with suspected spinal injuries.
* Control bleeding.
This is probably obvious but if you don't realize the victim is bleeding and they are rapidly going into shock, this should tell you something.
* Immobilize fractures.
This helps relieve pain and control bleeding.

Stop bleeding, using sterile bandages/dressings if available
Two important things here are to (a) stop any bleeding as soon as possible and (b) keep the wounds sanitary as much as possible. (a) is far more important than (b). Peripheral limbs are commonly lost to infection, but given the choice between stopping bleeding and using a non-sanitary cover, using the non-sanitary wrapping is preferred. Blood loss is bad. Wounds can be cleaned at a hospital.
If sterile dressings are not immediately available, use the cleanest item of clothing available
When ambulance arrives
Before the ambulance arrives, send people to the intersections in all directions to watch for/direct the ambulance.


When the ambulance arrives, it is important to stay out of their way as much as possible. Meet them and identify yourself as being ``in charge'' and to be the person to contact if they need anything (bikes moved, people moved, whatever). Make sure you
** Let them know who's in charge
* Give factual account of accident It is IMPORTANT for medical personnel to have an HONEST estimate of the speed and circumstances at the time of the accident.
* Give them all of the information that has been written down (periodic vital signs and the three questions from ABCC at 5 minute intervals, personal information about the victim, etc.)
* Give them an honest evaluation of patient's drug/alcohol consumption this will also help the anesthesiologist if one is necessary
* Stay back or leave if told

It is important to give them the most accurate information possible! If the person just had 10 beers in the past hour, tell them! They are not the law enforcement, their only concern is the safety of the patient. By underestimating, trying to cover up, or not telling the whole truth, you are only keeping important information which may be necessary for the safety of the patient if an anesthesiologist is needed this is critical info
If the helmet was removed, send it along in the ambulance. The doctors may use the visible damage to the helmet to assist them in what to look for in terms of injuries.
If there were leaking fluids, let the medical personnel know. The fluids may have gotten on the patient and they need to know if there was oil, gas, brake fluid or something like that on an open wound

I KNOW THIS HAS BEEN TOUCHED ON BEFORE BUT IT MIGHT BE A GOOD IDEA TO THROW OUT ONE MORE DISCLAIMER

EVERYONE SHOULD BE RIDING AS IF THEY ARE RIDING ALL BY THEMSELVES KNOWING THAT IF THE CRASH THEY ARE TOTALLY SCREWED
EVERYONE SHOULD BE RIDING IN A GROUP
EVERYONE SHOULD BE CARRYING A FIRST AID KIT
EVERYONE SHOULD BE CARRYING WATER
EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW THEIR FUEL CAPACITY AND MILEAGE LIMITS
EVERYONE NEEDS TO RIDE WITHIN THEIR ABILITYS
EVERYONE SHOULD BE PREPARED TO SPEND THE NIGHT IN THE COLD RAIN /SNOW IN THE MIDDLE OF THE DESERT IF THEY BREAKDOWN, START YOUR RIDE WEARING SOMETHING YOU WOULD BE COMFORTABLE SLEEPING IN
EVERYONE NEEDS TO RIDE WITH THE KNOWLEDGE THAT IF THEY CRASH IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BEFORE PROFESSIONAL HELP ARRIVES
BIKE RETRIEVAL IS SECONDARY TO GETTING THE RIDER THE HELP THEY NEED

ASSUME THAT THE OTHER RIDERS IN YOUR GROUP HAVE ZERO TO MINIMAL TRAINING IN BASIC FIRST AID & CPR


THE OTHER RIDERS AND RIDE LEADERS AND OTHER VOLUNTEERS ARE NOT HERE TO SAVE YOUR CLOWN ASS FROM YOUR OWN DRUNKIN HIGH SPEED STUPIDITY
THEY ARE HERE TO HAVE FUN AND RIDE
DON'T RELEY ON THEM
IF SOMEONE ENDS UP HELPING YOU BE SURE TO THANK THEM

IF YOU GET HURT ITS YOUR FAULT
IF YOU BREAK YOUR BIKE AND SPEND THE NIGHT IN THE DESERT ITS YOUR FAULT
IF NO ONE CAN HELP YOU ITS YOUR FAULT
TRY TO BE AS PREPARED AS YOU CAN FOR ANY SITUATION
__________________
Rich
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M1Jeep screwed with this post 03-22-2014 at 07:40 AM
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