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Old 01-25-2007, 10:54 AM   #7
motoged OP
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Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Kamloops, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freediver
Looking foreward to the rest of the story. I notice alot of Mexican water in the background of your photo's.
Freediver,
As your tag suggests, you like water....as your experience might indicate, that's a pool


But as the ride continued, we DID come across the remnants of the winter's heavier than normal rainfall ...

This pic is of Darren crossing one of the shallower river crossings we encountered in the mountains between Mulege and San Juanico on the Pacific coast. The September tropical storm Juan that flooded that area seriously rearranged the San Raymundo Arroyo road:


Of the half dozen wet crossings in that area this was the shallowest....the others were up to our knees....and as usual, some of the more demanding sections were not photographed as we were busy riding.

Some of the roads had been rerouted but remained consistent generally with the established route...the excess of standing water has apparently increased the incidence of mosquitos and Dengue fever in at least the Mulege area ...




Our first ride out of Mulege was on the afternoon that we arrived and took us along the river, out on to the airstrip at La Serenidad (after riding through a fisherman's yard and surprising an older fellow enjoying the afternoon sun but not our intrusion). Darren and I let 'er rip on a drag race out to the beach past the airstrip (eating Husaberg roost seemed to be my reward for initiating the duel) and out to the Sea of Cortez south of the lighthouse...




And while most of the sand was relatively packed, some sections were not and we could feel the motors sporadically strain under the load of riding "in" the sand rather than "on" it...we came up to the dunes at the end of that beach and determined that deeper soft sand just is not a rider's friend...


And just to punctuate the joy of the first ride...


On the way back to town we rode past the airstrip to La Serenidad again and asked around for an Arizona pilot with whom I had tentatively arranged some air time over that general area:
....Mike Goering...http://www.flybaja.com/
Most unfortunately, our timing was off and we were out of Mulege the days Mike was there


Back into town for a short tour and La Hacienda ...






















We started to plan the next week's rides with some careful deliberations...(note the speed with which Darren manages his cerveza)...



And being as astute and careful to examine options in detail as usual, Darren examines the options carefully...



The next day we rode in a liesurely fashion west of town through an area with ranchos....and led us to a 1/4 mile race track the locals used...




Darren seemed slow off the line as he was intent on catching bugs for a niece ...


Cute, if ytou like that sort of thing...


A key ride we had planned for that week was to ride to San Juanico (Scorpion Bay) on the Pacific coast. I had done that route several times 2 years earlier but the September storm had flooded the roads in the mountain/alto plano sections and it took a few tries to finally find the correct route...but we enjoyed exploring the "I think this is it" route options...







Again, Darren is scouting for prints to determine which trail to take....sometimes the right route just seemed to go up in smoke....



He has developed a divining hand-jive technique to roll us on our way ...









By the second day we determined the correct series of detours and the route to San Juanico was mastered....but there were a few stories developed on that final day when we rode across to the Pacific and back...

The wet crossings we encountered were not difficult but they did keep our boots full of water...


Along the way, we had to ask for directions....and my fundamental Spanish language skills were about as good as my directional guesstimations...







As we approached the ranchos several miles east of the turn-off at Ballena del Raymundo, Darren rode ahead and had his first taste of Baja silt....moondust.....

I was riding about 1/2 mile behind him in a flat section ...as I was gaining on him I saw his trail dust ahead and was encouraged as I recognized the area from previous rides. As I continued, the dust cloud was drifting in the expected direction but there seemed to be a blue and yellow obstacle on the road....it didn't take too many synaptic leaps to realize he was down and that the dust cloud was well removed from the crash site.

I rode up to see Darren lying on his left side, immersed in silt, and his Hussy laying on top of him like a drunk date

Unfortunately, my concern was for his well-being so I don't have any pics of that moment...so I remained seated on my bike (why race over and get dusty???) and offered the obligatory "Hey, you okay??"

Darren slowly extricated himself out of the two feet deep moondust, managed to get the bike off himself, and stood up with silt dripping off him in slow-motion rivulets.

He had some scrapes and bruises that were appropriate for the situation and had managed to plant the bike on top of himself rather than land in a large family of cactus that would have required serious needle-nose plier treatments. A slightly displaced bark buster appeared to be the only damage so, after a few minutes I rode ahead.

He approached in another cloud of dust...









We stopped to review the experience....




In this next picture (taken at same place as those above....and near the first rancho that will sell gas just east of the Pacific coast road turn-off at Ballena del Raymundo), you can see a new road cut into the distant hillside....this new road is a shorter route to Ejido Cadeje and San Juanico....



We eventually found our way into San Juanico through the newly developed road systems on the Pacific side just before Ballena del Raymundo and with the help of some locals and "sand map drawings" at the village Ejido Cadeje.... we rode into San Juanico at about 2:30....not enough time to lunge around, but enough for a cerveza, a visit with some locals, and a rip-roaring burn-out show...



San Juanico is a favourite surf location....





The store was my favourite beer location...



and the local biker show was entertaining (new cowboy boots and all)





We rode around for 5 minutes looking for the "Pemex" that the locals at the store directed us to, and eventually determined that the "Pemex" was another typical gasolineria operated by "Siphon Woman Extraordinaire"...
Again, no pics, but she impressed us with her novel technique: rather than suck on the siphon hose, she place her end of the hose in a gas jug, wrapped her hand around the hose and jug opening tightly, .....and BLEW into the jug neck (as oppoesed to SUCKING on the outlet end of the hose), thus creating a pressure differential that pushed gas into the hose.

Unfortunately we needed to blast back over the montains to Mulege, so we missed another opportunity to enjoy the hospitality of the locals.....

A friendly woman, with strong hands and a kind face....and a technique that impressed us to no end. Most unfortunate

The ride back to Mulege gave us the chance to find that new route over the mountain that appeared in the earlier pic....





A fast ride back, a shower, some party treats, and a day to remember with stories for the grand kids: "....did I ever tell you about the gas station in San Juanico?"






But Mulege had had more in store for us.....
__________________
Ged Schwartz
Kamloops , BC


Baja '05 , Baja 06/07 , Baja 08/09 , BC Alpine Single Track





motoged screwed with this post 03-29-2007 at 03:16 PM
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