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Old 07-12-2006, 08:38 PM   #1
jimmy2020 OP
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easier tire changes - milling stock rims or replacing?

I've heard that changing tires is real diificult on the 950. Any recommended upgrades to ease the process? I've heard of milling the stock rim or replacing with aftermarket rims.
Also is it needed on front and/or rear, or is one easy enough that no change is necessary.
Jim
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Old 07-13-2006, 09:12 AM   #2
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The tires on the 950 are no harder to change than any other stuff walled off road tire on any other bike, they are not easy. If you have not done this in the past get someone to show you how and have the correct tools. It is something you should know how it do, and practice will give you the confidence to perform the task in the field, should the need arise.

Good Luck.
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Old 07-13-2006, 10:23 AM   #3
MookieBlaylock
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i think a narrower sun or excel rear is way easier than trying with the stocker
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Old 07-13-2006, 02:23 PM   #4
katoosh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idahoskiguy
The tires on the 950 are no harder to change than any other stuff walled off road tire on any other bike, they are not easy. If you have not done this in the past get someone to show you how and have the correct tools. It is something you should know how it do, and practice will give you the confidence to perform the task in the field, should the need arise.

Good Luck.
+1

There are many reasons to change rims, facilitating tire change is low on that list. I've broken bead on 950 rear tire rear tire using the famous kickstand method many times--always solo. It works like a charm.

"I've heard", or "I've read", are both great, but no replacement for experience. I'd definitely have a go at it before dropping many hundred dollars on a solution YOU may not need.
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Old 07-13-2006, 02:44 PM   #5
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I'm in my 100 degree garage, swapping out the TKC's for the Scorps for some road ridin'. As I stand there catching my breath and cleaning the sweat off my glasses, it occurs to me that when the time comes and I do this in the dirt and rocks by the side of the road I'm gonna be risking some damage to the hubs and discs while wrestling with these monsters.

In the garage I'm kepping the hub ends and discs off the floor with some short pieces of 2x4. Anybody have recommendations for keeping the fragile bits from becoming to dinged up while on the side of the road?

Btw, the sidestand bead-breaking method works.
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Old 07-13-2006, 03:21 PM   #6
jsrider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhank
the sidestand bead-breaking method works.
I have a really, really stupid question: how do you put the bike on the sidestand with the rear wheel off? Maybe I'm missing something, but I can't visualize this technique.
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Old 07-13-2006, 05:30 PM   #7
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Put on centerstand

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsrider
I have a really, really stupid question: how do you put the bike on the sidestand with the rear wheel off? Maybe I'm missing something, but I can't visualize this technique.
You put the bike on the centerstand first then remove the wheel. Lay the wheel on the ground, deploy sidestand, carefully lean the bike so sidestand breaks the bead (don't forget remove the valve first). Do a search, there is a thread w/ photo's in the Orange Crush forum.
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Old 07-13-2006, 06:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhank
Anybody have recommendations for keeping the fragile bits from becoming to dinged up while on the side of the road?
Maybe a smaller diameter inner tube dedicated to the task? Try one an inch smaller than the wheel diameter. A tube will blow up pretty big without a tire around it. That should be enough clearance for the rotors and such.

- Jim

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Old 07-13-2006, 10:36 PM   #9
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Instead of fucking around with the sidestand, it's a tube tire ffs. All you have to do is either ride the bike or walk beside it while in first gear. The bead will break.

You guys never own dirt bikes before or what?
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Old 09-17-2006, 05:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhank
I'm in my 100 degree garage, swapping out the TKC's for the Scorps for some road ridin'. As I stand there catching my breath and cleaning the sweat off my glasses, it occurs to me that when the time comes and I do this in the dirt and rocks by the side of the road I'm gonna be risking some damage to the hubs and discs while wrestling with these monsters.

In the garage I'm kepping the hub ends and discs off the floor with some short pieces of 2x4. Anybody have recommendations for keeping the fragile bits from becoming to dinged up while on the side of the road?

Btw, the sidestand bead-breaking method works.
Gees, just find a dead log or similar material, never had to look to far myself.
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Old 08-07-2006, 08:48 PM   #11
woody's wheel works
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i can tell you have NEVER changed a 950 rear tire!!!!

just read this funny quote,,,i'll try and dissect it,,,


Quote:
Originally Posted by idahoskiguy
The tires on the 950 are no harder to change than any other stuff walled off road tire on any other bike,
they are not easy.

you're right,,,they are HARDER!!!!

If you have not done this in the past get someone to show you how and have the correct tools.

i'm ALL ears,,as well as alot of the rest of us

It is something you should know how it do, and practice will give you the confidence to perform the task in the field, should the need arise.

Good Luck.
like i said we are ALL ears

BTW,,,at WWW we modify the bead 4-5 inches at the valve stem,,,not that it matters,,,as long as YOU know where it was modified,,,i believe this is a win -win scenario,,,opitimal tire retention with a built in bead-breaking spot

we only remove the full bead for racers doing enduros who are more concerned with getting the tires fixed ASAP,,,and/or riders who demand it

the larger safety bead on these big bikes DOESADD a measure of incresaed insurance of having the tire break off the bead,,,i've read and heard of accounts of riders going many miles on flats allbeit at reduced speeds...so there is something to be said for BIG FAT safety beads,,,til ya try to change the tube that is
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Old 08-18-2006, 08:32 AM   #12
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Eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by woody's wheel works
BTW,,,at WWW we modify the bead 4-5 inches at the valve stem,,,not that it matters,,,as long as YOU know where it was modified,,,:
Hmmmnnnn - I'm a bit puzzled.

It must be easier to break the bead opposite the valve, then lever the tyre over the rim at the valve - because the tyre will drop futher into the rim well opposite the valve. The other way around, surely the valve area on the tube will stop the tyre going as deep into the well.

Now I'm confused after writing that - am I right or not?

If I'm right, it'd be better to mod the rim opposite the valve, wouldn't it?

Or, have I got this all mixed-up?
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Old 08-18-2006, 08:56 AM   #13
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Relieving near the stem just makes it easy to remember where it is. Once the bead is broken you can start removal anyplace you like. If it's really tight I get a buddy to stand on the tire while I put an iron on either side of the valve stem. I like these combo tools for their light weight.
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/...6_combo_lever/
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/...6_combo_lever/
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Old 08-18-2006, 01:43 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKN4DRT
Relieving near the stem just makes it easy to remember where it is. Once the bead is broken you can start removal anyplace you like. If it's really tight I get a buddy to stand on the tire while I put an iron on either side of the valve stem. I like these combo tools for their light weight.
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/...6_combo_lever/
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/...6_combo_lever/
I did mine opposite the valve stem. I can still remember where it is.


Nate

ps -just about two weeks out before I test mine out. and Yes, I will post results and pix.
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Old 08-18-2006, 09:43 PM   #15
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here's what matters,,,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabberwocky
Hmmmnnnn - I'm a bit puzzled.

It must be easier to break the bead opposite the valve, then lever the tyre over the rim at the valve - because the tyre will drop futher into the rim well opposite the valve. The other way around, surely the valve area on the tube will stop the tyre going as deep into the well.

Now I'm confused after writing that - am I right or not?

If I'm right, it'd be better to mod the rim opposite the valve, wouldn't it?

Or, have I got this all mixed-up?
it does NOT matter where you modify the rim,,,as long as YOU know where ya did it or where it was modified.....the point is to first break the bead ,,then ya push down and bust the bead the remainder of the way,,,,

it DOES matter where ya start to spoon the tire off the rim,,,,in the case of the LC-4s and 8s without rim locks,,the better choice is to start spoonoing it at the valve stem,,,cuz like ya noticed,,,the place that will give your tire the most slack will be opposite the valve stem
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