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Old 08-16-2011, 06:34 PM   #1
El Borracho OP
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Question Plugging a tire

As a noob, this may be a silly question, So I humbly seek advice from those of you who may have the knowledge.
I found a nail in my rear tire today.
Rode home slowly and just am wondering, should I buy one of those plug kits to repair it?
Seems like a failure of the repair job would be ugly!!!
I am not independently wealthy, but I have a long ride coming up this weekend.
Tire is a tourance with 1500 miles on it.
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Old 08-16-2011, 06:46 PM   #2
Bigger Al
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What kind of bike? Is the tire mounted tubeless? If not, then no, you can't plug it.

Plugging a tubeless tire is perfectly acceptable.
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Old 08-16-2011, 06:55 PM   #3
El Borracho OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigger Al View Post
What kind of bike? Is the tire mounted tubeless? If not, then no, you can't plug it.

Plugging a tubeless tire is perfectly acceptable.
The bike is a 1200 GSA and the tire is tubeless.
Any plug kits that you recommend?
Also any other tips are appreciated.
Thanks and thanks
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:05 PM   #4
hugemoth
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I've plugged many tires with the "sticky rope" type plugs and have never had one fail. YMMV. Just follow the instructions on the package.
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:12 PM   #5
GreaseMonkey
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Go ahead, get a kit and make sure you read the instructions, and get an air pump (there are quite a few people who like to get the $10 slime pump from Wal mart and take all the plastic bits off so they get pretty tiny) and go ahead and ride.

With any new tire repair, it is a good idea to check the tire pressure a few times for the first couple of days. It may lose a couple pounds while the string seats in but it should be stabilized after a day. If not, redo it IMHO.
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Old 08-16-2011, 08:18 PM   #6
Flashmo
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Originally Posted by GreaseMonkey View Post
Go ahead, get a kit and make sure you read the instructions, and get an air pump (there are quite a few people who like to get the $10 slime pump from Wal mart and take all the plastic bits off so they get pretty tiny) and go ahead and ride.

With any new tire repair, it is a good idea to check the tire pressure a few times for the first couple of days. It may lose a couple pounds while the string seats in but it should be stabilized after a day. If not, redo it IMHO.
+1 on every word GM said.

I have NO issues with plugging my tires with the sticky strings and riding them to the end of their useful life.
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:19 PM   #7
El Borracho OP
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Thumb Thanks one and all

Thanks to all for advice.
I will repair it and ride.
Camping at Big Sur this weekend with old high school buddies ( about 450 miles round trip ) so I wanted to be sure about the repair.
Anyhow, Thanks again
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:55 PM   #8
JimVonBaden
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http://www.jimvonbaden.com/Tire_Plugging.html

No worries!

Jim
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Old 08-16-2011, 08:02 PM   #9
El Borracho OP
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Thanks for the great demo Jim!!
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:16 PM   #10
ibafran
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Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Nice production, Jim.
And I agree with everything posted.
However, rider may want to consider some tweaks to this operation.
I didn't get a reall good look at Jim's sticky string insertion tool but I suspect that it is of the 'buttob hook' design. I have had the hook snap off inside the tire and think that the design is weak. Therefore, I recommend the 'tweezer' design. It is more robust and about as bullet proof as you can get. Also, Jim's tools have the screwdriver type handles. Some tire are unbelievable tough and that type of handle just doesn't cut it. My tools have a 'T' handle.They don't pack as nice as the others. I cut about an inch off each end to make them more compact. Works great for me.

The downside to the tweezer tool is that the sticky string may be inserted too far and come out of the tweezer uselessly on the inside of the tire. What happens is that the rubber cement acts like a lube. And when the string gets to the inside of the tire, it suddenly slides too good and too fast to keep the whole string from going inside. There are several ways to avoid this problem. My fav way is to clamp a small pair of vice-grips (usefull to get the nail out too) to the tweezer tool shaft causing the tool to stop before the string disappears into the tire. Pretty much idiot proof and it gives me a two-handed grip on the tool if I need it.

Some other pointers: Carry a big tube or two of glue. There is no such thing as too much glue. Pack it in a zip-lock bag so if it busts, you don't have a mess in your kit. Carry at least a dozen sticky strings. If you have a choice between red and black, the red are better and the black are fine. If you are going on an expedition, buy new glue for the trip, even more strings; and add them to the stuff already in your kit.

DO NOT trim the string flush with the tire. Trim it off about 1/8 inch long. The end will sort of mushroom over and help keep the end of the string from working into the tire while the glue sets up good.

Do not pull the puncturing object until you test that it is indeed leaking. Mark the rim at a non-active leak with a bit of duct tape so that you can find it again while you look for another puncturing object that is probably the active leak. Plug active leaks first, duh.

Do not pull the puncturing object, if any, unless you have the reamer in hand for immediate insertion into the hole. Some holes are so small that if you take your eye off it, you play hell trying to find it for the reamer.

Do not take the reamer out of the tire until you are ready at hand to insert the sticky string.

Sticky string can be doubled over or two or more strings added to the tweezer to plug larger holes. (Let's see 'em do that with that Stop&Go stuff.)

If you are in the boonies, plug a sidewall hole anyway to get to safety and then replace that tire asap. Pick a safe place to make tire repairs if possible. Right next to the side of the highway after a blind curve or hill, is not optimal especially after dark. Nor is it a good idea to do the work in the bottom of a wash or gully. Working with poisonous snakes, fire ants, and large carnivors in the vicinty isn't optimal either. If you ride with ear plugs/music, take that shit out so that you can hear stuff coming.

It helps if your tire repair kit has its own bag. Thus, when you need it you don't have to unpack the whole bike to gather everything that you need. My tire repair kit also has a couple of bandaids, small flash light, insect repellant, and a very small mister of soapy water to test the plug (saliva works about as well as soapy water for a test), and a bit of bar soap in case I need to make up a lot of soapy ditch water to find a leak.

That's all that comes to mind at the moment.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:36 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by ibafran View Post
... Nor is it a good idea to do the work in the bottom of a wash or gully. Working with poisonous snakes, fire ants, and large carnivors in the vicinty isn't optimal either. If you ride with ear plugs/music, take that shit out so that you can hear stuff coming.....
You guys are so anal, thinking you've crested the mount....

How should a BWM rider wipe his or her butt when needing to take a dump in the woods?

This is plugging a tire, using a system that's worked for upteen years.

Afterwards, you sould wash your hands with 'x' cleaner, and don't forget about your nails, unless your wore latex gloves. The best gloves for repairing a tire on a BMW bike are 'x'. I always carry 'x' pair of these and keep them in a special place.
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Old 08-21-2011, 06:32 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Lone Rider View Post
You guys are so anal, thinking you've crested the mount....

How should a BWM rider wipe his or her butt when needing to take a dump in the woods?

This is plugging a tire, using a system that's worked for upteen years.

Afterwards, you sould wash your hands with 'x' cleaner, and don't forget about your nails, unless your wore latex gloves. The best gloves for repairing a tire on a BMW bike are 'x'. I always carry 'x' pair of these and keep them in a special place.
At least the rest of us added something constructive, unlike your spew, eh?

..........shu
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Old 08-16-2011, 08:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Borracho View Post
Rode home slowly and just am wondering, should I buy one of those plug kits to repair it?

Yes, get the 'sticky worms' kit and follow the directions. Use the glue provided.

Seems like a failure of the repair job would be ugly!!!

Actually, the sticky string is not going to fall out, they get hot as you ride and bond to the tire, so failure mode would be a small leak not a sudden loss of air.
My opinion, and my experience with 3 plugged tires.

...............shu
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:04 PM   #14
LittleRedToyota
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all my bikes have always used tubed tires, so no plugs in those.

but i have plugged more cage tires than i can remember (all with the self-vulcanizing plugs...no glue). only ever had one fail...and that "failing" was a very slow leak--had to make sure to put air in it about once a week.

if you are uncomfortable about the plugs, though, you can remove the tire from the rim and patch it from the inside "the right way". they sell those kits in auto parts stores, too. (it's kinda like an innertube patch, but you put it on the inside of the tire instead of the outside of a tube.)
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:50 PM   #15
mjydrafter
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As a goodyear certified tire jocky and retreader, the super preferred method is to plug (seals the cords from water & corrosion) and a patch on the inside (seals the liner). This is for truck tires BTW... should be major overkill for autos and cycles.

That said, I think I have plugs without patches in about 4 of the 8 cage tires between the wife and I.

Plug away.

Some companies make some fancy rubber plugs, but like many above, I have nothing bad to say about the sticky ropes. Plus you can find them anywhere.
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