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Old 03-15-2005, 09:28 AM   #1
Stobie OP
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Question LC4 Suspension: To revalve, or not to revalve?

I'm torn.

There's no doubt that the springs on my 640 Adv are too soft for my 215 or so pounds. I'm sure that changing to stiffer springs and fresh oil would be significant improvement, and there is so much damping adjustment available that revalving simply because the springs are stiffer shouldn't be necessary, especially if I go with heavier than stock oil.

I've never had the suspension on a dirt or dual-sport bike revalved, so I haven't experienced the difference. Some people say it can make the bike more plush and more bottoming-resistant, but I wonder if it's worth the expense and down time for a dualsport bike that's not going to be raced.

Right now, the bike handles bigger hits better than smaller bumps, at least until it bottoms. Most of my riding is dirt roads that can be fast and/or bumpy, or rough, rocky trails. I haven't gotten big air with it, but I imagine it wouldn't be hard to bottom out, since I can practically bottom the front end with the front brake on pavement.

OK, now I'm rambling. Any of you guys have experience with revalved suspension on one of these bikes, versus just changing the springs? Is the extra $300-$400 for the revalving worth it?
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Old 03-15-2005, 09:37 AM   #2
markjenn
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I had the forks revalved on my 300EXC which, with stiffer springs, are the same forks as on my LC4. The suspension was improved, but only marginally. I think when you get the spring rates correct, sag set correctly, clickers dialed in, and clean/correct-vis/proper-height fork oil, you're 95% of the way there, especially on a non-MX bike like the LC4.

- Mark
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Old 03-15-2005, 10:02 AM   #3
Rocamojo
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FWIW, I have resprung my Adventure and it still bottoms chronically in the rear off-road. I had the forks working pretty good and they probably could be further improved with additional testing and adjusting. However, the shock is maxed out on compression and bottoms on everything. The bike has under 2500 miles on it. So since it probably needs a suspension service I am going to have to do the revalve. I'm a bit lighter at 195.

That said, springs may be all you need. It really depends how you are going to ride it. I would suggest respringing and if thats not enough, have it revalved.

Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 03-15-2005, 11:14 AM   #4
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I replaced just the fork and shock springs, and it made a big improvement for off road riding. However, the rear shock is still a little soft for off road use so, next time it needs to be rebuilt I'm also going to have it revalved.
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Old 03-15-2005, 04:48 PM   #5
Stobie OP
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It sounds like the prudent course of action would be to go stepwise; respring first, then revalve as necessary. Maybe that should have been obvious.

Thanks for the insight, fellers.
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Old 03-15-2005, 05:52 PM   #6
Flanny
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Revalving the fork and rear shock were the single best improvements made on my 640 Adventure.

Everthing about the bike felt better - cornering, bottoming, whoops, even riding straight down the highways.

IMHO respringing and revalving forks should be the first thing done to any bike - even before pipes and stuff. It makes that much of an improvement.

you would probably be a much smoother and faster rider with good suspension rather than any engine work you could do.

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Old 08-17-2005, 02:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stobie
I'm torn.

There's no doubt that the springs on my 640 Adv are too soft for my 215 or so pounds.

Fork springs? Shock spring? All?


How, may I ask did you come to know this?
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Old 08-17-2005, 02:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocibiker
Fork springs? Shock spring? All?


How, may I ask did you come to know this?
The bike is sprung for a 165lb rider.
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Old 08-17-2005, 03:10 PM   #9
Jeff620RXC
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If your suspension is too stiff will it effect the turning characterisics on dirt?
Thanks
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Old 08-18-2005, 06:00 AM   #10
Stobie OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocibiker
Fork springs? Shock spring? All?


How, may I ask did you come to know this?
What Buckster said.

Plus, like GP, I could bottom the front on the brakes. And I couldn't get good sag numbers.

I ended up with .50 kg/mm springs up front and a 8.0 kg/mm spring on the back. Sag numbers are where they should be.

Since I'm a cheap-ass, I decided to revalve the front fork myself, using a kit from these toads. Since they apparently know nothing about the version of the WP fork used on the LC4's, they didn't send me all the shims I needed, and repeated emails and phone calls got no response from them. Service after the sale was non-existent.

Anyway, I decided to try a modified version of their recommended shim stack, using the shims I had, with less than stellar results. The front end is still choppy over little stuff, but handles big bumps extremely well. I didn't have the shims needed to soften it up significantly. Now, my choices are to buy the necessary shims from a third party and revalve, hoping the stack specs I have are good, or punt and send them off to a pro. Still .

The upside is that I learned a lot about my forks. The mechanics of revalving a fork are quite simple. The trick is knowing what shim stacks to use. I could probably change the stacks in my base valves in about an hour. Getting in to change the midvalve and rebound stacks would require complete disassembly, and would probably be a good rainy afternoon w/ a sixpack project. The Fabtech kit only changes the base valve stack, and I don't have midvalve and rebound stacks for this bike, so I'm leaning toward sending the forks off. The suspension shops are making money off their knowledge, not their labor or materials.

On the back, I just changed the spring and adjusted the clickers, and I'm satisfied. Gary Emig, and a guy at Factory Connection (Aaron?, Adam?) both told me that although the forks need help, the rear shock on the LC4's does not need to be revalved. My experience supports this.
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Old 08-18-2005, 08:35 AM   #11
Velocibiker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stobie
What Buckster said.

Plus, like GP, I could bottom the front on the brakes. And I couldn't get good sag numbers.

I was just worried that it was simply bad settings on your part. Too many people simply don't set the front and back correctly and blame the bike on poor performance. Many times, it's simply a lack of proper set-up and maintenance.

After I rode a friend of mines street bike (it rode like crap), I asked what his suspension settings were and when was the last time he serviced the shock & forks. The "deer in the headlights" look was all I needed to know .

Anyway, glad you got it where you like it!!
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Old 08-18-2005, 10:14 AM   #12
ktmnate
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I too did the .50 forks and 8.0 shock with re-valving by Dicks in Roseville. It totally changed the bike. I can still bottom the front end on drop-off's but only once in a while when I am being sloppy. and it isn't that hard of a hit.


ps -I weigh 215#



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Old 08-18-2005, 09:10 PM   #13
ram1000
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I weigh 220 plus gear. I had my springs changed to the recommended rate by Race tech. I think 47 on the front. They didn't make a rear spring so I used an Adventurer spring on my dualsport. I can still bottom the suspension, but for my average riding I would not want things any stiffer. I would guess that revalving would allow a stiffer spring while keeping the initial movement soft, but for trail riding I just don't need anything better, and for whoops and such I can adjust the compression up a click and go as fast as I need to go. The spring changes were the best money I ever put into a bike. If my LC4 were newer I would spend the money for revalving just to see how it works.
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Old 01-27-2008, 11:29 AM   #14
DBGcooper
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I have a 07 640, which I bought for the height, I am 6'4", but after purchasing and riding the bike I read it was only sprung for a rider of 165 lbs. - I go 245. I did some research and sent my Shock to Jeff Slavens at Slevens racing for a 9kg spring and a revalve. I plan on doing the forks as well, but my dealer in N.H said they could take care of this. Spring rate for them will be 50 or 52. Good Luck DBG
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Old 01-27-2008, 08:46 PM   #15
mars
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DBGcooper
I have a 07 640, which I bought for the height, I am 6'4", but after purchasing and riding the bike I read it was only sprung for a rider of 165 lbs. - I go 245. I did some research and sent my Shock to Jeff Slavens at Slevens racing for a 9kg spring and a revalve. I plan on doing the forks as well, but my dealer in N.H said they could take care of this. Spring rate for them will be 50 or 52. Good Luck DBG
I weigh in at 200 and went with the 52's with an additional 17 mm of preload with the oil height at 140. They work great for me.
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