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Old 11-24-2012, 12:27 PM   #1
ausfahrt OP
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Trailering

I bought a Pitbull trailer restraint a couple of years ago for my '07 GSA. I love it and it performs flawlessly. For those of you not familiar with the Pitbull system, it does not require any straps or tie downs at all. It does not compress the suspension and allows the bike to "float" on the trailer.

My concern is regarding the swingarm pivot bearing. The swingarm assembly was not designed for the torsional loads that this puts on it. I have not had any problems and I just returned from a family Thanksgiving reunion that got me out of the sandbox for a few days.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated, here are a few pics of my rig:





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ausfahrt screwed with this post 11-24-2012 at 12:39 PM
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Old 11-24-2012, 12:36 PM   #2
JimVonBaden
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I wouldn't use the rear stand. Like you said, the bike isn't designed for that kind of loading. As the suspension moves the rear stand will stress the FD and suspension, and the side loads will definitely stress the FD and pivot bearings.

Use the front stand and tie it down with straps to the telelever tightly. Then strap it down to the rear frame snug, but not tight, to keep the rear from moving around.

Jim
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Old 11-24-2012, 02:05 PM   #3
def
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Whenever trailering the GS, I have always used straps attached as high on the bike as sensible to reduce strap loads as well as increased security and minimize load to the bike at attachment points.

At the front, I roll the bike into a wheel chock and use ratchet straps at the fork brace oriented so that the straps are pulling the bike forward slightly into the chock.

At the rear, I secure straps to the passenger peg mounts with only moderate compression of the rear suspension. Finally, I place a chock at the rear of the rear tire.

I have trailered my GS thousands of miles in this manner without incident. Also, I put a cover on the bike and use bungees to secure the cover.
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Old 11-25-2012, 01:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by def
At the front, I roll the bike into a wheel chock and use ratchet straps at the fork brace oriented so that the straps are pulling the bike forward slightly into the chock.

At the rear, I secure straps to the passenger peg mounts with only moderate compression of the rear suspension.
That's pretty much what I have done over the years; from the motocross bikes forward.

All of the tie down points I have used in the past have been high up and frame and fork oriented, and then let the suspension work. Works whether it is on a trailer or in the back of a pickup.

It appears that this 'pitbull' has it backwards. Sorry.

The stresses are not on the frame (strongest point) which makes me worry about using it, especially on a heavier bike.

Basically it seems to me that capturing the wheel, any wheel or any other 'low' point of restraint / tie down point I think makes the stresses higher overall on the bike (because of the weight above the restraint / load forces etc.) and I think in general not a good idea at all. I thought the idea of tying your bike down or securing it for transport was to reduce the load levels as much as possible.

Keep it simple - make it high and snug.

my 2
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Old 11-25-2012, 03:20 AM   #5
ausfahrt OP
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Thanks for the comments, I figured that I would get positive and negative replies. In response to a couple of your questions and thoughts:

- I probably will continue to use the Pitbull and closely monitor the swingarm after each use.
- The front chock is not needed for the Pitbull, it is there because I haul other bikes too.
- I hauled the bike to N. Georgia to do some riding in the mountains...8 hours on I-75 on a bike is not my idea of fun.
- The trailer is an Aluma MC10. I love it and recommend it, I even pull it with my Honda Civic and I like the hidden ramp.


- Link to Aluma: http://www.alumaklm.com/motorcycle-trailers.html
- We are happy with the Forester and since we are moving to Vermont, it was on our short list. It has a boxer too, I must be horizontally opposed.
- The Pitbulls are bike-specific. You must have a separate one for each brand/model of bike that you haul.

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ausfahrt screwed with this post 11-25-2012 at 03:31 AM
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:37 AM   #6
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Don't do it

Quote:
Originally Posted by ausfahrt View Post
- I probably will continue to use the Pitbull and closely monitor the swingarm after each use.
No need to "closely" monitor it. Just a quick glance will tell you if its ok. It will either be in 1 piece, or look like THIS (after my buddy ran into a ditch. he was unhurt)--->>>



Kinda speaks for itself. Not much metal holding the FD to the swingarm.
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:42 AM   #7
ausfahrt OP
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Great responses...seriously. The sarcastic replies were entertaining too.

But the bottom line seems to be that none of us KNOW how the swingarm/FD will handle the loads over the long term. It is all just speculation and conjecture. Grenading a FD by riding into a ditch or examining how BMW crates their bikes does not interest me in the slightest so I am willing to be a guinea pig of sorts. If something breaks due to my chosen trailering method then I will fix it and keep riding....and change my trailer restraint method.

And you all will be the first to know. I wouldn't want to deprive you guys of your chance to say "I told you so!"
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:30 AM   #8
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Well, in your original post, you stated->>

"My concern is regarding the swingarm pivot bearing. The swingarm assembly was not designed for the torsional loads that this puts on it."

I think that was an astute judgement, but now you are rejecting it. So put a couple of back-up straps on the forks so we don't have to worry about meeting your GS head on sliding down the road at 70mph.
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Old 11-29-2012, 09:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ausfahrt View Post
Great responses...seriously. The sarcastic replies were entertaining too.

But the bottom line seems to be that none of us KNOW how the swingarm/FD will handle the loads over the long term. It is all just speculation and conjecture. Grenading a FD by riding into a ditch or examining how BMW crates their bikes does not interest me in the slightest so I am willing to be a guinea pig of sorts. If something breaks due to my chosen trailering method then I will fix it and keep riding....and change my trailer restraint method.

And you all will be the first to know. I wouldn't want to deprive you guys of your chance to say "I told you so!"
You'll fit right in in Vermont....Eeeeeyuppppp.
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Old 11-24-2012, 02:16 PM   #10
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I like it! That looks like a great tool. As a rule of thumb always ask yourself, "does this stress anything more than me riding it?" i don't think so. Looks really well done
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Old 11-24-2012, 04:08 PM   #11
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I like it! That looks like a great tool. As a rule of thumb always ask yourself, "does this stress anything more than me riding it?" i don't think so. Looks really well done
So you think that the FD incurs lateral stresses as it would on the stand as shown when riding?

Jim
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Old 11-24-2012, 04:18 PM   #12
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So you think that the FD incurs lateral stresses as it would on the stand as shown when riding?

Jim
Most definitely. When you lean the bike, the same forces are in effect. Think of the whole system; when we lean the bike while riding, the bike itself may be moving as one unit, however the link between the road and tire is effectively the same as the link he is using. In actuality, the only thing he has done with this stand is take the tire out of the equation.

I went to the website to see if I could obtain one for my drz: they do, but they are $279. Wow! I'll stick with the ratchet straps!
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Old 11-24-2012, 04:24 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Chris41483 View Post
Most definitely. When you lean the bike, the same forces are in effect. Think of the whole system; when we lean the bike while riding, the bike itself may be moving as one unit, however the link between the road and tire is effectively the same as the link he is using. In actuality, the only thing he has done with this stand is take the tire out of the equation.

I went to the website to see if I could obtain one for my drz: they do, but they are $279. Wow! I'll stick with the ratchet straps!
Not really. When you lean a bike the force is still transmitted along the axis of the wheel. There is minimal side stresses comparred to fixing the wheel and pushing sideways on the seat or top of the bike.

Don't forget, this is a single sided shaft drive bike, not a chain drive with a fixed axle shaft across both sides of a swingarm.

Jim
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Old 11-24-2012, 04:44 PM   #14
bemiiten
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The rear swingarm moves through a arc, changing the wheelbase in the process, Kinda looks like the rear stand would inhibit that movement. I'd ditch the rear stand and use tie downs at the frame member that runs under the swingarm. That allows the suspension to move freely and keeps the tension on the tie downs more consistent then if they were attached to the passenger peg loops.
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Old 11-24-2012, 05:38 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Not really. When you lean a bike the force is still transmitted along the axis of the wheel. There is minimal side stresses comparred to fixing the wheel and pushing sideways on the seat or top of the bike.

Don't forget, this is a single sided shaft drive bike, not a chain drive with a fixed axle shaft across both sides of a swingarm.

Jim

The axis of the wheel is transmitted through to the swing arm.

I'm no expert rider, but I do understand mechanical systems. We may have to agree to disagree.

Of course, we could always meet in the middle and advise a strap be put on the front to assist in holding the bike upright. All bases covered!

Personally, I believe that after spending the almost 300$, and hauling it a few times with no issue, he is going to keep using this bracket no matter what we say!!!

***I just went and looked at the Lockitt tie down system. While I like that one equally as well (especially the price), if you use the wheels to hold the bike up, the effect on the swing arm is the same! The only way to reduce side load or tension is to use side load on the bars to hold the bike upright.

Chris41483 screwed with this post 11-24-2012 at 05:46 PM Reason: Info
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