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Old 04-29-2013, 10:41 AM   #1
max384 OP
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What food do you pack for remote trips?

Just wondering what you guys are packing for food for a trip. I realize a lot of us just eat out while on the road, but sometimes that's just not an option. So, with that in mind, what brands and types of foods do you guys pack? I usually pack some protein bars, canned goods (though not many cans, as they're heavy), MRE entrees I get from drills, instant oatmeal packs, and/or mountain House meals. I'm sure there are other options out there for good packable foods, so let's hear 'em!

I'm also curious just how much food that you guys pack. I realize this is heavily dependent upon how far you're going and where you're going, but I'd imagine that most of us won't be going for more than a couple days or so on a bike between stops that would have food available on most of our trips. I usually pack food for about a day or two... But I really haven't been on a ton of trips, and none that were all that remote.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:27 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by max384 View Post
Just wondering what you guys are packing for food for a trip. I realize a lot of us just eat out while on the road, but sometimes that's just not an option. So, with that in mind, what brands and types of foods do you guys pack? I usually pack some protein bars, canned goods (though not many cans, as they're heavy), MRE entrees I get from drills, instant oatmeal packs, and/or mountain House meals. I'm sure there are other options out there for good packable foods, so let's hear 'em!

I'm also curious just how much food that you guys pack. I realize this is heavily dependent upon how far you're going and where you're going, but I'd imagine that most of us won't be going for more than a couple days or so on a bike between stops that would have food available on most of our trips. I usually pack food for about a day or two... But I really haven't been on a ton of trips, and none that were all that remote.
Instant Oatmeal (there are some pretty good brands out there), Starbucks "Via" coffee, and dehydrated backpacking food for me If I am going to be out in the back country. But that is generally only necessary for a breakfast and an evening meal as the GS needs to eat every so often...which almost always puts me close to a hamburger.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:38 AM   #3
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Nuts and granola bars are a favorite of mine. You did say "remote trips" which, for me, means well off the highway (i.e. dirt). So, I also carry a water purifier when I'm out in the wilderness. Saves having to carry a lot of water with me.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:40 AM   #4
Edwards
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I buy "Protein" brand bars at Costco. They have an ungodly amount of calories and protein for their weight. Kind of the opposite of diet food, they pack a punch when it comes to calorie-to-weight ratio.
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:42 PM   #5
243Win
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One or two of the boil in bag camp foods all the hikers carry. I make every effort not to eat them tho' due to the massive sodium content. But they are there in a pinch.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:35 PM   #6
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Poptarts and granola bars. Make sure you get lots of water.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:42 PM   #7
Ricky Chuck
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Clif Bars are dense and provide a good bellyful for several hours while not setting you up to to need unscheduled get-offs 12 hours later if you get my drift, lol.
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Old 04-29-2013, 09:21 PM   #8
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I don't like to carry and clean cookware/plates/etc when camping off the bike in remote locations. Mountain House meals only require boiling water (Jetboil) and no cleanup. Lots of flavors available, some at Walmart even (beef stew and eggs/bacon). I also like peel-top fruit/applesause/pudding cups, Spam Singles, vienna sausages, energy/granola bars, nuts, and small pop-top cans of diced pineapple. Leave every day with more than you think you could possibly need.

I keep a Sawyer Squeeze water filter, Spam Single, and two energy bars in the first aid kit in case something gets sideways and a ride goes longer than expected.


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Old 04-30-2013, 06:33 AM   #9
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Tupperwear Bowl

If you stop at a resturant bring the t/w with you . Today many resturants meals have more food that you want at one sitting. When I get my meal I split it in 2 and save the rest for a second meal. I no longer need to eat everything on my plate ( sorry Mom) . Styrofoam dose not travel well on a bike. When you stop for gas start picking up all the free stuff at fast food place and gas stations...salt, pepper, plactic stuff, just a days worth as you will be getting gas again. Napkins to take to the bath room just in case there is no paper there.
It never bothers men to eat day old pizza for breakfast so the night before think about breakfast. While traveling I have purchased Whopper Juinors and had the cold for breakfast.
When the t/w is clean, I pack leaky stuff in a small lock top bag just in case something leaks.
If you like something in a can carry a can opener or a knife with one and remove it into a plastic bags.
T/w , spoons, plastic bags can all be washed in a gas station bathroom.

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Old 05-14-2013, 02:35 PM   #10
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Talking Mountain House Meals

Costco in the area has been selling boxes of 10 Mountain House meals for just under $50. They're easy to fix with just hot water. I always bring along extra spices to add. Plus I usually stop when I can and try to pick up some fresh fruit to add, otherwise I use the dehydrated/freeze dried kind. Everything is always better with a reasonable amount of Oban.
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Old 05-01-2013, 07:24 PM   #11
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OK.
When you pass by a city with a Cost Plus World Market stop, go in and head to the section with the sample sizes.
Go wild, they have tons of great treats in easy to transport sizes. Meat and cheese that don't need a cooler, crackers,cookies, condiments etc.
Don't forget to stop in the chocolate section and the beer section as well.

Stop at the local market for a $5 rotisserie chicken, a can of beans or corn, a bag of ice for my Tequila and find camp.
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:57 AM   #12
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Haven't done any camping on the moto yet (and my month-long trip just got pushed back by a few months, silly wedding), but have done lightweight backpacking and camping. The Mountain House stuff actually isn't bad -- especially if you don't want to carry/clean anything -- but they're a bit unhealthy. Pricey as all hell, too.

MRE's are actually great if you can stomach them. Personally I love the things. Remember they're packed with calories on purpose. I haven't been able to reliably find a supplier in years, though.

Homemade beef jerky is a great camp and trail food. Inexpensive if you do it at home, keeps a good while at all temps, and your oven probably can do all the dehydrating you need. Or use a box fan and some furnace filters (see Good Eats episode on jerky). Combine with shelf stable cheese, bread/tortillas, and a side of fruit/veggies for a pretty complete meal. You can also rehydrate jerky for use in stews and soups.

Tortillas are awesome for saving space vs. bread. Corn are healthier, but I prefer flour or whole wheat. Multigrain crackers are small and have solid nutrition, but be ready to eat them as crumbs if you don't pack them in something solid :P

Take some peanut butter, honey, dried fruit (cranberries and cherries are good), flax seed, slivered almonds, and sunflower seeds. Slap all that in a tortilla and enjoy. Tons of nutrients and tastes awesome.

Powdered pancake mix comes in small packets and you just need water. Combine that with some dried fruit.

Smoked meats/sausages are shelf stable. Ditto for a good many cheeses.

I Can't Believe It's Not Butter is shelf stable and doesn't need to be refridgerated. I can believe it's not butter, but it's a good substitute. Likewise (jkam mentioned this) hoard or buy packets of condiments. Shelf stable for a decent period.

Olive oil is shelf stable for all intents and purposes, is healthy, and can do multiple duties as fry oil, cooking oil, and flavor enhancer. Chain lube if you really wanna. Stir with some powdered spices to make a trail vinegarette for meat/jerky marinade or sauce for veggies/meats. Just using olive oil to fry something up can dramatically change its flavor profile.

If you have the room/weight fresh veggies and fruits are awesome suppliments and will be plenty shelf stable for a day or two minimum. Planning ahead you can dehydrate damn near any fruit or veggie at home. Avoid canned stuff if you can as it destroys most of the nutritional content of veggies and their flavor.

Others have mentioned the individual packets of tuna. These are great too, but pricey compared to a can of tuna. I pack a can if I can afford the space/weight, or put it in some tupperware that I plan on reusing later to save weight. It's not like it's a huge price difference, but yea :P

Look into dehydrated beans and legumes. Make sure that you can presoak them in ambient temp water and have time for it -- you really don't want to waste a ton of fuel trying to keep a rolling boil going for a long time.

Others have mentioned instant oatmeal. Don't buy the retail stuff -- make your own. Really freaking easy, tons less sugar, and much better nutritional content. Same space, less cash.

Bullion and/or stock cubes are tiny and come in a variety of types (beef, chicken, veggie, etc). Toss these in with some water, jerky, and dehydrated veggies for a soup or stew. You can also add in dehydrated beans if you have some, but rehydrate those first. Though the cubes tend to be high in sodium so keep that in mind.

Boil-in-the-bag stuff is great since you prepare, cook, and eat all in the same bag and can transition to pot-based cooking just fine.

Anyway, general rule of thumb is look to backpacking and DIY boil-in-the-bag type recipies. On a moto you're probably less concerned than a backpacker about weight and/or space. You can only go but so far from civilization without packing inordinate amounts of fuel, so trying to get 7 days of food into a 10L packing space isn't really necessary. Well, unless you're plopping your moto somewhere for a week to hike on foot, but that's a different story.
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Old 05-04-2013, 11:00 AM   #13
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Stop at the local market for a $5 rotisserie chicken, a can of beans or corn, a bag of ice for my Tequila and find camp.
hey you know, i'd forgotten about that! used to be dinner on the way back from the pub, a whole chicken, bottle of wine, loaf of bread and american style cheese spread/slices. dinner for 1x drunk student less than 10 and often a lot less because late at night theyre selling off the days deli and bakery stuff. substitute the chicken for a bucket of curry, pies, sausage, hocks, bacon joints, whatever was left.

(depending on amount of beer drunk, often EVERYTHING that was left! those were the days....)
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:21 PM   #14
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I'd imagine that most of us won't be going for more than a couple days or so on a bike between stops that would have food available ...
It's never been an issue traveling by motorcycle no matter how remote. Backpacking, kayaking, & bicycle touring, yes, but not motorcycle traveling. Motorcycles need gas. Gas outlets generally have some kind of food for sale or are located in some small town or village.

You may have trouble finding fresh vegetables or steaks, and you might eat Raman or mac and cheese, but you won't go hungry.

At the very worst you might miss a meal. That wouldn't hurt most of us. Water is much more important.

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Old 05-06-2013, 03:35 AM   #15
Jamie Z
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It's never been an issue traveling by motorcycle no matter how remote. Backpacking, kayaking, & bicycle touring, yes, but not motorcycle traveling. Motorcycles need gas. Gas outlets generally have some kind of food for sale or are located in some small town or village.

You may have trouble finding fresh vegetables or steaks, and you might eat Raman or mac and cheese, but you won't go hungry.

At the very worst you might miss a meal. That wouldn't hurt most of us. Water is much more important.
It's true, but it does come up. Two instances come to mind during my travels, both times in Texas.

I was heading into Big Bend National Park. According to Wikipedia, "Big Bend is one of the largest, most remote, and least-visited national parks in the lower 48 United States." I was planning to stay a few days. Sure, there's a camp store in the park, and a gas station with a few snacks. And there's even a restaurant. But if you want to eat right and not pay a bundle, one has to bring in his own food. I stopped at the grocery store beforehand and loaded up.

Later the same trip, I spent a couple days at Chinati Hot Springs. It's not all that remote. I suppose you could find a store within 15 or 20 miles of the place, and if you were in dire need, I'm sure the caretakers who live on the property would feed you. The point is, no food is available, and if you want to spend a couple days there, and you want to enjoy yourself, you ought to carry some food you can prepare while you're there.

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