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Old 06-08-2013, 12:14 AM   #1
rustygardhouse OP
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Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 57
'80 R65 Bing 32 float level

Yes, I'm going to flog this again...

Yes, I've read the other posts...

Yes, I've read Snowbum's article on float bowl fuel level.

I rebuilt the Bing 32 carbs on my '80 R65 & I'm now in the process of tuning them.

To help, I welded wide band O2 sensor bungs in front of the cross over tube so I can read the F/A mix using a AEM wide band F/A gauge as I motor around.

The AEM gauge has been very helpful.

Like everyone else, I've found the Bing 32 carb performance is very sensitive to float bowl fuel level.

& now the question:

Has anyone tried to set the float level on Bing 32 installed on a R65 using Snowbum's method?

I'm trying to set the level to 24mm as Snowbum suggests but the carbs are at such an angle, I'm spilling fuel out of the float bowl as I remove it from the carb.

I've also seen various measurements floating around:
- 22.5mm
- 23mm

Is Snowbum's 24mm right?

Or is this a set the fuel at a depth, balance the carbs & check the F/A mix by your favorite method.

One thing I have noticed is that if one carb is running slightly richer/leaner than the other, the power imbalance is clear on my homemade differential manometer as I rev the bike towards my balance RPM. The closer the carbs are tuned to the same mixture, the more power & less vibrations the engine has.

OK, cry havoc & loose the dogs of opinion!
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Old 06-08-2013, 08:15 AM   #2
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rustygardhouse View Post
Yes, I'm going to flog this again...

Yes, I've read the other posts...

Yes, I've read Snowbum's article on float bowl fuel level.

I rebuilt the Bing 32 carbs on my '80 R65 & I'm now in the process of tuning them.

To help, I welded wide band O2 sensor bungs in front of the cross over tube so I can read the F/A mix using a AEM wide band F/A gauge as I motor around.

The AEM gauge has been very helpful.

Like everyone else, I've found the Bing 32 carb performance is very sensitive to float bowl fuel level.

& now the question:

Has anyone tried to set the float level on Bing 32 installed on a R65 using Snowbum's method?

I'm trying to set the level to 24mm as Snowbum suggests but the carbs are at such an angle, I'm spilling fuel out of the float bowl as I remove it from the carb.

I've also seen various measurements floating around:
- 22.5mm
- 23mm

Is Snowbum's 24mm right?

Or is this a set the fuel at a depth, balance the carbs & check the F/A mix by your favorite method.

One thing I have noticed is that if one carb is running slightly richer/leaner than the other, the power imbalance is clear on my homemade differential manometer as I rev the bike towards my balance RPM. The closer the carbs are tuned to the same mixture, the more power & less vibrations the engine has.

OK, cry havoc & loose the dogs of opinion!
A differential manometer does not show power imbalance, only vacuum imbalance. Vacuum correlates with power output, to an extent. The correlation can be better or worse and in all cases can be omitted by measuring power directly.

I was thinking of setting up O2 sensors in the holes where my cross over used to be. If you have a crossover you can be measuring mix from the far side, even upstream of the crossover (depending on how far upstream you went.) I may still do it, but I don't have a crossover and I'm less and less interested. I do plug chops to evaluate overall mixture. I still have the O2 sensors I was going to put in but I have to find the bungs I made.

The bike does not go down the road bolt upright. It does all sorts of angles and bounces around. So I don't bleed over float height. I set them parallel to carb body, per the manual, and let it go at that.

I do not vacuum balance. Tried it with various gauges, including a spendy and very accurate Walus differential manometer. I could just nail the vacuum, but when I checked the power output, it was off. Power balancing works better for a smooth engine. Simply make both sides put out the same amount of power working against the compression of the other side. It's simple, reasonably quick, and the gear goes in my on-board toolkit.

These carbs are simple to set up to run very well without lots of fussing. Sort of sad when lots of fussing and something to play with is what you want. BTDT. mebbe get FI and play with the mappings instead.


As a side note, my tiller has no float and bowl setup on the carb. Rather the carb is bolted directly on top of the fuel tank and there is sort of a cup/depression in a metal strap that gets splash filled with gas. That's it. The thing jumps around so much the cup stays filled and oddly enough it will even sit and idle w/o running the cup dry. It does have a choke, throttle, enricher , idle and main jet. Not a completely primitive carb.
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Old 06-08-2013, 07:04 PM   #3
guy152
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I have the same problem, I think it's due to a more inclined carb angle on the r65...always been a pain to set. Bought bike new and noticed the carbs tops were tilted to the engine, always thought this was so to offset the incline, or slope angle from air cleaner to carb.

guy152 screwed with this post 06-09-2013 at 05:34 AM
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Old 06-08-2013, 08:43 PM   #4
supershaft
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A manometer does in fact show power imbalance. That is as long as the engine runs mostly on air. Hopefully around a ratio of 13:1 by weight. That's a lot of air!

23 or 24 mm? It all depends on how you look at the fuel wicking up your measuring devise. Adjust the float level on the bike to shut off just as the float is parallel with the carb body. Then take the fuel line off the carb before you remove the bowl. No gas will spill out. Measure the depth of the gas. THAT's how deep it should be. Do it a couple of times just to make sure you are consistant but you will be since that is the best way to set your float level.
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:29 AM   #5
guy152
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I have tried several times, but it would overflow on my r65, changed floats and pins too, still would pour out, possibly there's a greater pitch angle to the r65?
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:32 AM   #6
guy152
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Sorry, I was refering to the 23 / 24 mm, I will perform the float level to body technique today...thanks SS.
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Old 06-09-2013, 02:43 PM   #7
supershaft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guy152 View Post
I have tried several times, but it would overflow on my r65, changed floats and pins too, still would pour out, possibly there's a greater pitch angle to the r65?
I am talking about a R65. There's no difference doing this form any other model.
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Old 06-16-2013, 01:08 AM   #8
ME 109
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Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Then take the fuel line off the carb before you remove the bowl..
Correct to my way of thinking too.

I take a different approach to float level tho'.
Fuel on boots, float too high.
Sports bikes in front instead of behind, float too low.
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Old 06-16-2013, 01:41 AM   #9
Plaka
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Originally Posted by ME 109 View Post
Correct to my way of thinking too.

I take a different approach to float level tho'.
Fuel on boots, float too high.
Sports bikes in front instead of behind, float too low.
Must have some pretty lame sport bikes down there. Even an old 600 sportbike will dust an airhead. (so would my K bike) And even more so in the twisties. Not so good on the longer courses tho'...more than 500 miles and somehow they fade away.
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