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Old 01-12-2014, 03:57 PM   #1
armourbl OP
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Possible solution to death wobble with Dunlap 908 RR

I say possible in the subject line because I don't have enough ride time yet to know for certain if this is the cure all or just makes things better.

While reading endlessly about tire recommendations, I ran across a recommendation a poster made for wobble at speed or similar characteristics. He recommended using the product named Ride On. http://www.ride-on.com/motorcycle-formula-mot.html. He even said he completely removed the wheel weights. I left the weights on my wheel since I didn't know what to expect for results and the product will work with them.

Works with tubes and radial tires. For a 90/90/21 front you need about 6 ounces of product according to their installation table.

I put the product in and ran the bike for 12 miles near the house on some surface streets and freeway. As the directions say, it took a few miles to seat properly around the tire. After that, things felt so much better. Before installing this I didn't dare take the bike over 85 mph, and the wobble was there from about 75 mph and especially with any deviation in pavement surface.

After install I was able to confidently take the bike up to 95 mph, but I stopped there as I didn't want an insane speeding ticket or to chance the knobby tires with tubes much faster. I made several aggressive lane changes above 75 mph without any incident or sign of the wobble. The bars still feel light at those speeds, but not scary.

Only time will tell for sure if this turns out to be a winner, but so far so good.

This could also solve the need to balance the wheels after installing new rubber and I might even be able to reuse the tube with the product if it is in good condition.

Update:
Rode the bike to work yesterday. About 70 miles round trip, mostly freeway. While I can say that running the product in the front tire has most certainly helped to improve the systems, it hasn't eliminated them entirely. Crossing the paint dividing the lane, cracks in the pavement, etc., make the bike wobble at speed. It isn't nearly as scary was before, but still there. Maybe it is just a characteristic of this type of bike that I need to adapt to, we'll see. Like everyone recommends, I'll be trying a new front tire eventually and hope that it resolves the issue.

Second Update:

Mounted up a new Michelin T63 to the front this morning and then rode for 60 miles. Just to recap, I'm still running with the Ride On product in the inner tube. With the new tire, I also removed the wheel balance weights. The road conditions were a mix of surface streets, freeway, hwy, asphalt and grooved concrete.

It probably comes as no surprise to many of you, but changing the front tire was the cure for my wobble issues. Rode steady and stable on any and all road conditions at any speed. Make me a heck of a lot happier with the new bike.

The T63 isn't an aggressive knobby tire, but still has enough there to make it good probably most conditions, but I'm guessing not great off road. For now, I'm happy with that. It will be a long while before I start single-tracking this beast, and most dirt it will see will probably be fire roads for the time being. And when it does see dirt I'm expecting to be loaded down and not trying to set any time/speed records off road. I have my CRF450R for that kind of riding.

ben

armourbl screwed with this post 01-19-2014 at 01:53 PM Reason: update
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:34 PM   #2
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I use it as well. I've used in in my previous bike and I think it takes care of balancing without the need for weights. It also gives me a little bit of comfort as far as enhanced puncture protection.

I did not use it for the 908s because I never really thought about it. But when I changed tires the wheels were definitely out of balance (rough at slow speed) so I put it in and removed the weights. I think it works and will continue to use it.
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:12 PM   #3
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Why would anybody run the 908's at speeds over 75 mph? 95 mph?
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:19 PM   #4
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I think the 908 gets squirrely because it is so tall and jacks up the ride height in the rear, When I ran them I slid the fork tubes all the way down in the clamps to raise the front and it helped a lot
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:32 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dustodust View Post
I think the 908 gets squirrely because it is so tall and jacks up the ride height in the rear, When I ran them I slid the fork tubes all the way down in the clamps to raise the front and it helped a lot
I've seen this answer before. Please forgive my noob question: how do you slide the fork tubes down? Or can you point me to a thread that describes it?
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Old 01-13-2014, 08:28 AM   #6
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Many times the forks are as far down as they can go in the clamps already. Put bike on center stand. May need to remove front wheel, especially if it's heavy. Loosen clamps. Move the forks where you want them. Keep in mind there are limits to how far you can move them. Be careful tightening up the clamps also. Pretty easy but know the limits, know the tightening sequence of your clamp bolts and know the torque specs.
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:21 PM   #7
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Because we take the bike on the highway and sometimes pass people.
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Old 01-22-2014, 09:24 AM   #8
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It seems to he related, at least somewhat, to the size of the knobs 😳. The KBB on my bike also has a larger, less aggressive knob design. So, I guess it's a compromise between all out dirt vs dual sport.

Yea, yea, let the large knob jokes commence.
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Old 01-23-2014, 09:23 AM   #9
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The biggest reason 908's are "loose" is besause they are in fact...a KNOBBY!

Yes propperly setup suspension, steering dampners and the like help it considerably. The real deal is whether you feel comfortable enough as a rider to deal with a wiggly, loose riding bike.

I had a set of 908's that were mostly worn and not so great for the dirt anylonger. I kept them on and commuted on them for the rest of their life. I like to get my money's worht out of my tires . My commute is CA HWY680 cruising anywhere between 80-85. Yes, they were loose. Keep a loose grip on the bars and let it wander a bit. Just Imagine you are riding through a really loose trail. Its not for everyone but some dont mind.

I say do whats comfortable for you. The best thing you can have on your motorcycle is confidence.
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Old 01-23-2014, 11:53 AM   #10
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I ran a 908 rear with a MT21 front and it would wag at a given speed.
By playing with the geometry I was able to eliminate that.
There was never any issues with TKC80's or the stock Scorpion A/T's.

I would say they both contributed to the imbalance and I had the same wag issue with an MT21 front on my DRZ400.

I put a Kenda Trackmaster 761 on the DRZ, stable as could be, so the MT21 is a bit particular to set up.

I liked the 908 in the dirt in Baja and it was fun to light it up sideways up my drive on the way home too! ;-)
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Old 01-23-2014, 12:42 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wsmc99 View Post
I ran a 908 rear with a MT21 front and it would wag at a given speed.
By playing with the geometry I was able to eliminate that.
There was never any issues with TKC80's or the stock Scorpion A/T's.

I would say they both contributed to the imbalance and I had the same wag issue with an MT21 front on my DRZ400.

I put a Kenda Trackmaster 761 on the DRZ, stable as could be, so the MT21 is a bit particular to set up.

I liked the 908 in the dirt in Baja and it was fun to light it up sideways up my drive on the way home too! ;-)
Glad I didn't try the MT21, it was that or the T63 for choices in stock at the dealer.

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Old 01-27-2014, 06:19 PM   #12
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it is not a street tire it is a means to get to the dirt.


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Old 01-28-2014, 04:47 PM   #13
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So, I had two bikes with almost this same identical problem, the 2011 990 Dakar and a 2004 Honda Goldwing. Yep, that's right a Goldwing! So, after about 70,000 miles of wobble on the Goldwing, and numerous new and different type tires front and back I finally lowered the forks by about 10mm in the triple tree. That solved the wobble.

So, when I bought the KTM it had the wobble right out of the box. Adjusted the presets, no luck. It was frustrating, took it back, dealer said it was the tires. Rode them until I replaced with Heidenau's and then more. Over 32,000 miles still the wobble. I then tried the 10mm adjustment and bam, wobble was gone.

I know at least 4 other Dakar owners, some who had no wobble at all others who had one just like me. For some reason I can't convince anyone with the wobble to try this fix. I would like to know if I just got lucky or if this minor adjustment works for others.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:06 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfink View Post
So, I had two bikes with almost this same identical problem, the 2011 990 Dakar and a 2004 Honda Goldwing. Yep, that's right a Goldwing! So, after about 70,000 miles of wobble on the Goldwing, and numerous new and different type tires front and back I finally lowered the forks by about 10mm in the triple tree. That solved the wobble.

So, when I bought the KTM it had the wobble right out of the box. Adjusted the presets, no luck. It was frustrating, took it back, dealer said it was the tires. Rode them until I replaced with Heidenau's and then more. Over 32,000 miles still the wobble. I then tried the 10mm adjustment and bam, wobble was gone.

I know at least 4 other Dakar owners, some who had no wobble at all others who had one just like me. For some reason I can't convince anyone with the wobble to try this fix. I would like to know if I just got lucky or if this minor adjustment works for others.
You managed to correct for the rear SAG not being correct by adjusting the front...

Misery Goat and others have given the answer....Set the suspension....no more problem
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:28 PM   #15
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You managed to correct for the rear SAG not being correct by adjusting the front...

Misery Goat and others have given the answer....Set the suspension....no more problem
Suspension was set many times, including modified spring and valve set in forks and upgraded/rebuilt rear spring/shock, still problems!

Because one Dakar has this problem and the next one doesn't I believe the problem is the angle of the fork rake. It finds neutral and the natural oscillation between positive and negative fork pressure causes wobble. Sure, lowering or raising the fork, thereby changing the neutral point, is a bandaide. But the real fix would be to change the rake angle.

Fixing this, by the way, can also be done by changing the SAG in the same sort of bandaide approach.
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