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Old 01-24-2014, 01:44 PM   #1
Alcanfinforo OP
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Riding Standard vs Dual Sport

Been reading quite a bit of threads in the ride reports forum (specifically those from US to South America) and I've noticed all rides are done in dual sports. The point of my reading is to plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750. Before you rip me a new one, it's not stripped, chopped, bobbed, or cafe racer style. My ride is as it came of the line in early 1976, last year I put 15k miles with no problems and regular (1500-2000 mile) oil change intervals.

Does anyone take long trips on Standard type motorcycles?

What are the huge advantages to riding dual sport? For those that have taken the trip down central america.

Am I being a fool for wanting to take such a trip on an old moto that is not exactly dual sport? Again, for those that haven taken the trip mentioned. I know that at least in Colombia the locals ride 125cc "standard" motos.
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Old 01-24-2014, 01:59 PM   #2
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read rwd dougs ride reports.
contray to what some on here will say, you will have a blast. a different tool will still get the job done, sometimes more fun due to being different. go for it and don't forget to do a ride report.

welcome to the forum.
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Old 01-31-2014, 04:56 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by farmerstu View Post
read rwd dougs ride reports.
contray to what some on here will say, you will have a blast. a different tool will still get the job done, sometimes more fun due to being different. go for it and don't forget to do a ride report.

welcome to the forum.
Especially when you bury it to the axles in mud on one of those nice unimproved South American road ways!

Do it!
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:03 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
Been reading quite a bit of threads in the ride reports forum (specifically those from US to South America) and I've noticed all rides are done in dual sports. The point of my reading is to plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750. Before you rip me a new one, it's not stripped, chopped, bobbed, or cafe racer style. My ride is as it came of the line in early 1976, last year I put 15k miles with no problems and regular (1500-2000 mile) oil change intervals.

Does anyone take long trips on Standard type motorcycles?

Peter and Kay Forwood rode through every country in the world on a Harley Electraglide so I think you'd be fine on a standard. Unless you're trying to ride on dirt roads, 90% of your miles are going to be on pavement so 90% of the time you'll be glad your on a cb 750 and not a dual sport. Of course that other 10% of the time you might really really wish you were on a dual sport.

When I did my South America trip I met a young Aussie who had never owned a motorcycle before picking up a Yamaha 650 standard with Pennsylvania plates in Mexico and riding it down to Ushuai. He didn't seem to be any worse for wear for it.
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Roam screwed with this post 01-24-2014 at 04:52 PM
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
Been reading quite a bit of threads in the ride reports forum (specifically those from US to South America) and I've noticed all rides are done in dual sports. The point of my reading is to plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750. Before you rip me a new one, it's not stripped, chopped, bobbed, or cafe racer style. My ride is as it came of the line in early 1976, last year I put 15k miles with no problems and regular (1500-2000 mile) oil change intervals.

Does anyone take long trips on Standard type motorcycles?

What are the huge advantages to riding dual sport? For those that have taken the trip down central america.

Am I being a fool for wanting to take such a trip on an old moto that is not exactly dual sport? Again, for those that haven taken the trip mentioned. I know that at least in Colombia the locals ride 125cc "standard" motos.
My first street bike was a 1974 CB 750. damn good bike, and it'll off road some too

Almost any bike can go say over the passes of CO, the difference is how much do you wanna work at it?

It all depends on where you want to go and how you want to get there.
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Old 01-24-2014, 03:28 PM   #6
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Read Jupiters Travels! Guy rode around the world on a standard Triumph! Not long ago all bikes started as standards. People then either chopped them, installed clip ons and rear sets, or installed Vetter fairings and luggage. Just get out and ride, make your own adventure!
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Old 01-24-2014, 04:00 PM   #7
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I bought my klr because it was the closest thing to a standard that I was willing to pay for. Don't let what some keyboard commando writes get to you.
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Old 01-24-2014, 10:03 PM   #8
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Tires. The secret lies in what's hitting the road.

Have fun.
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Old 01-25-2014, 01:44 AM   #9
JohnCW
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Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
plan a ride myself, on a 1976 CB 750.
Am I being a fool for wanting to take such a trip on an old moto that is not exactly dual sport? .
The only problem I could anticipate is sourcing spare parts if you has an out of the ordinary problem. However you better than anyone else would know how hard parts are to get. Take a selection of things likely to go wrong, but that's no different for even a new bike.

The CB750 is as comfortable a bike as any. I'd fit a large universal screen like the quick removal version of the National Cycle Deflector Screen, makes all the difference over the long miles.

JohnCW screwed with this post 01-25-2014 at 01:49 AM
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Old 01-25-2014, 07:47 AM   #10
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Go for it
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:36 AM   #11
Alcanfinforo OP
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Thanks all for the vote of confidence, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. I'll be sure to read the suggested trip reports. There is a lot of good, no, great information on here.

Quote:
My first street bike was a 1974 CB 750. damn good bike, and it'll off road some too
I've taken mine off road a bit too, and who says CB's can't have knobbies, right!!


Quote:
Peter and Kay Forwood rode through every country in the world on a Harley Electraglide so I think you'd be fine on a standard. Unless you're trying to ride on dirt roads, 90% of your miles are going to be on pavement so 90% of the time you'll be glad your on a cb 750 and not a dual sport. Of course that other 10% of the time you might really really wish you were on a dual sport.
This is why I asked, most pictures are on paved roads and a few on hard packed (what we call) "gravel" roads. Detours on washouts and that seem to be packed down enough from heavy traffic. Mud is just part of the adventure.

Quote:
The only problem I could anticipate is sourcing spare parts if you has an out of the ordinary problem. However you better than anyone else would know how hard parts are to get. Take a selection of things likely to go wrong, but that's no different for even a new bike.

The CB750 is as comfortable a bike as any. I'd fit a large universal screen like the quick removal version of the National Cycle Deflector Screen, makes all the difference over the long miles.
Yes, clutch cable broke on me once last year and I was 800 miles from home. Camped out for a day before a farmer stopped and helped. He had a spare cable for a smaller honda that we made work on mine. I ended up finishing the season on that cable.

I have a small fairing, luggage rack and a crash bar that I intend on using. The fairing is small but helps a lot, might invest in the National Cycles screen, its slightly taller.
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Old 01-25-2014, 02:53 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
I have a small fairing, luggage rack and a crash bar that I intend on using. The fairing is small but helps a lot, might invest in the National Cycles screen, its slightly taller.
And you might find wider at the base and sides. I've got a garage full of smaller headlight bolt on ones as I was trying not to destroy the naked look of my bike. After lots of expensive experiments I found the good old NC Deflector screen, same as I'd fitted to my 250 commuter, to work best.
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:13 AM   #13
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The bike is definitely up to the task, the countries you'd visit aren't...

Living in "Latin America" I wouldn't take such an old bike for that kind of trip, I know that getting parts for new bikes is a PITA, but it is twice as hard to find parts for older bikes. A newer bike will be more reliable and your chances of not needing spare parts during the trip will be much higher.

If you don't mind the risk, then go ahead, the bike will certainly do it.
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Old 01-31-2014, 09:31 AM   #14
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Old 01-29-2014, 12:37 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
Thanks all for the vote of confidence, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. I'll be sure to read the suggested trip reports. There is a lot of good, no, great information on here.

I've taken mine off road a bit too, and who says CB's can't have knobbies, right!!


This is why I asked, most pictures are on paved roads and a few on hard packed (what we call) "gravel" roads. Detours on washouts and that seem to be packed down enough from heavy traffic. Mud is just part of the adventure.

Yes, clutch cable broke on me once last year and I was 800 miles from home. Camped out for a day before a farmer stopped and helped. He had a spare cable for a smaller honda that we made work on mine. I ended up finishing the season on that cable.

I have a small fairing, luggage rack and a crash bar that I intend on using. The fairing is small but helps a lot, might invest in the National Cycles screen, its slightly taller.

One small hint, maybe you've heard this one, maybe not. I ride a lot of vintage bikes and in fact a couple vintage Hondas, and on a long road trip many people thread an extra clutch cable and throttle cable (the pull side) down through the stock routing and zip tie it to the good one. Then if you are in some god forsaken place and it snaps on you all you have to do is hook up the spare and you are rolling again.
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