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Old 09-23-2009, 10:23 AM   #16
brian81
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Yes !
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Old 09-23-2009, 10:51 AM   #17
locorider
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Well...you became girly the day you bought the GS...jaja...kidding.

Do what you have to do to feel confy in your bike. Its yours!!!
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Old 09-23-2009, 12:47 PM   #18
Bucko
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Wink Y not do this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tmex
I have been facing this question myself for some time, and I have decided to go lower even though I am taller than the OP and I can get both feet down (not flat) on the bike with a heavy rear preload (which I think is necessary for this bike to work right off road).

The primary reason is the ability to spin the bike around comfortably off road. I have had my F8 off road quite a lot, and there are times when you decide that the trail is simply not working out. Those are the times when you want to plant a foot, angle the forks over, and spin it around. It is a bit too tall and heavy for me to do this manuever without some drama. I am going to go lower and take my chances with ground clearance. Stepping off and trying to work the bike around is just too painful.

If I was spending most of my time on the street, I would leave it as is.
I agree with the spinning around problem, my 31" inseam and skinny legs don't give me a lot of confidence for that manuever. But after a week of riding dirt roads on my GS8 earlier this month I pretty much mastered the multiple Y turn on those roads and trails that didn't go where I wanted to...or quit going anywhere. As long as you don't run the front tire up the berm so far that you can't touch the ground on either side, 2-3 iterations of forward & backwards with a little turn each time will get you around without dismounting. I get the best U-turn I can (usually easier while standing on the pegs), then finish it with as many Ys as necessary.

On another note, I have the Sargent seat and it does seem to keep my feet farther off the ground than the stocker due to wider sides. Much more comfy, though. On long days in the saddle my butt only starts to think about hurting at the end of the day instead of within an hour of breaking camp. And it's not in the way while standing.
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:53 PM   #19
T
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You're not a girly man, you're just short.

For the price of the GS they should put the lowering kit and the seat on for you- NO CHARGE!

Go back to both of those Stealerships and kick the salesmen in the balls- if you can kick that high....
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Old 09-23-2009, 06:13 PM   #20
PeterW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooter1942
Originally, I was going to go with the 650 for that very reason. However, I decided that the extra horsepower of the F800 would be better for those occasions when I'm riding two up or carrying a load.
Look at the torque/power curve. Unless you are carrying that at 100mph+, or with the tacho near the stops I THINK the 650 will still come out ahead.

Pete
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Old 09-23-2009, 06:25 PM   #21
Scooter1942 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterW
Look at the torque/power curve. Unless you are carrying that at 100mph+, or with the tacho near the stops I THINK the 650 will still come out ahead.

Pete
Oh well. Too late now.
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Old 09-23-2009, 07:17 PM   #22
Torquinian
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Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dert Gerl
My advise would be to ride the bike for a while and then make your decision. ...
I'd be willing to bet that you find yourself comfortable on it pretty quick.
Ditto That
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Old 09-23-2009, 07:33 PM   #23
Gravehunter
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Adventure bikes not the best setup if your short.
I got a buddy that is about your measurments and he was complaining about his lost ground clearance after lowering his bike so he could touch the ground ... etc...

I told him to shut up! The world is made for short people... low tables that i can't get my legs under very well, low sinks i have to stoop over to get to, little cars with no leg room, typical jeans selection(for short people) at the stores, cut out bike seats.. so short people can reach the ground, gotta look for "tall" sizes in riding jackets and pants, urinals so low i feel like i'm pissing on the floor..... 18" wide seats at events that i can barley fit in......it goes on and on!!
Finally something made for us taller guys!! So.. you adapt this time... Mother %*$@#&!! Sucks don't it!!
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Old 09-23-2009, 07:43 PM   #24
Gravehunter
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seriously though.... if you've never had a bike that you couldn't flat foot the ground on it with both legs... alot of it is just getting used it to. I don't know how much time you have on the bike.. but give it some time.. you may get used it and be fine with it in a while.

If you need to lower it... its probably not going to be a huge deal. You'll just have to keep it in mind when ever you take it off pavement so you are careful with your lesser ground clearance. I'd get a skid plate if you don't already have one.. it will eat up some more ground clearance.. but will save the engine cases most of the time if you ever misjudge somthing. Actually.. doesn't the GS800 come with one??
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Old 09-23-2009, 08:56 PM   #25
blugu64
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I've got a 29" Inseam and while I can only get the tips of my toes down on the 33.5inch seat height transalp. It's never been a problem. You should be fine once you get used to it.

EDIT:
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
I can barely tiptoe the thing and usually captain morgan it at stop lights.
Nice, I'm stealing this.
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Old 09-24-2009, 06:10 AM   #26
BykMyk
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What Dert Gerl said, ride it a while to see what you think. May help to wait and evaluate what exactly you want to do after a few weeks. One thing I did (I'm vertically challenged too) was to raise the front forks to the factory scribe line, that gave me a few centemeters. Now that I have been riding the bike a while I've decided to keep it as is.
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Old 09-24-2009, 06:34 AM   #27
kbuckey
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I'm same size as OP and when I bought my DR650 I kept telling myself I should go to the lower suspension setting. Now, however, 12 years later I've kinda given up on the idea! I can just get the tippy toes of both feet on the ground but usually I just slide off and put one foot down. In 2007 I added a V-Strom and with it I can get just a little more of each toe down, but I do the same, slide off to one side and put a whole foot down. Actually I have more trouble with my ZX-6R - the pegs are so high that the movement to put my foot down is pretty ungainly at stops. And it's fairly tall too. The only easy ride is the ZRX. On the other hand, I'm never "cramped" on a bike!
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Old 09-24-2009, 06:45 AM   #28
Threewheelbonnie
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If you are lowering just so you can "flat foot" and you are under sixty and don't have a huge bloke riding pillion, then yes you are a girly man

There is no need to do this if you can actually ride. Practice slideing in the saddle to account for ground that slopes away from you and doing full lock figure of eights stood on the pegs. As both feet should be up before the wheels have gone round once, the whole "flat footing" concept is just a matter of giving confidence to those without the skill.

The skills will be much more use to you later than bits of metal for mucking about with the suspension.

Andy
(1.65m/75kg wet, former R1100GS rider with 85 kg pillion)
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Old 09-24-2009, 09:22 AM   #29
SkiFastBadly
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Maybe you just need different boots

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Old 09-24-2009, 10:03 AM   #30
Bike4Fun
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I've got a 30 in inseam and was a little uncomfortable on the bike in the beginning. I can barely tippy toe both feet. Now, I've gotten use to the bike and simply put one foot down at a stop. I have no need to put another foot down. Off road you should be standing on the pegs and moving over the obstacle not paddling! As far as turning around, I have no problem dismounting and doing a several point turn. I don't need to be fancy and prove anything to anybody! Hell I can't power turn a 200 lbs dirt bike so why am I going to try on dual sport bike that feels like it weighs 100 times more.

Do what makes you feel comfortable but give it more time and gain some confidence before you go and spend money on something you may not need.
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