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Old 05-27-2010, 10:04 AM   #16
Apostolos OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David_S
Sounds like way too much work to adjust a chain. I think I'll just stick to the old method. Can't see my self going to that much trouble if I'm on a trip and need to adjust. Also I'm lazy and wrench for a living so I'm a firm believer in don't make it any harder than it has to be.
Just for clarification, you wouldn't have to remove the shock bolt every time you adjusted your chain.

You actually only do it once to get the proper chain tension, once you have the proper chain tension, then you make your baseline chain slack measurements either off the center stand (which I prefer) or the side stand.

Those base line measurements should really never change and serve as the basis for all your future chain adjustments.

Hope this helps.

God Bless,
David
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Old 05-27-2010, 10:19 AM   #17
The Griz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden
...I found the same thing - tension measured on the side stand vs. the center stand was the same number within my measurement error range of probably 1/4".
Not for me. I have the center stand. The difference in tension while the bike is on its center stand versus side stand is pretty significant. When I check chain tension I do this:

-Put bike on center stand
-Loosen rear axle nut
-Using a measuring caliper, I adjust chain tensioners equally on both sides. I measure from a fixed point to the adjuster bolt head on both sides, and adjust until they measure equally:


-Pushing inward on the rear wheel I then tighten down the rear axle nut.
-I then measure chain tension while on center stand
-Finally, I put the bike on its side stand and measure chain tension.
-If tension while on side stand is incorrect, I repeat the process with a longer caliper measurement until I measure 40-45mm of chain slack while the bike is on its side stand.

-The use calipers is strictly to ensure rear wheel alignment by measuring equally on both sides**
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Old 05-27-2010, 10:48 AM   #18
Singletrack_mind
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I'm actually really glad Apostolos did his (her?) measurements. I like to do this with every bike I own as well, and on this bike particularly I've been curious but also too lazy to get to it. When the chain is adjusted to the tighter end of BMW's spec., the chain appears to get quite taut under rider load so I have been running it at the looser end of the range just in case. Nice to know that I don't need to worry about it, Thanks!

Manufacturers DO make mistakes sometimes, and if it's your bike & you are wrenching on it & trusting it out in the hinterlands, you owe it to your self to double-check things like chain tension.
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Old 05-27-2010, 11:32 AM   #19
Apostolos OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Singletrack_mind
When the chain is adjusted to the tighter end of BMW's spec., the chain appears to get quite taut under rider load so I have been running it at the looser end of the range just in case. Nice to know that I don't need to worry about it, Thanks!
I'm sure you'd agree that's it's probably better if everybody checks their own work.

I just wanted to let people know that there is a simple way to check for proper chain slack without having to completely remove the rear shock.

I would suspect that my measurement observations would be consistent form bike to bike, but personally, I wouldn't put my faith in someone else's work when I could "easily" check it myself.

God Bless,
David
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Old 05-27-2010, 04:28 PM   #20
JRWooden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
Not for me. I have the center stand. The difference in tension while the bike is on its center stand versus side stand is pretty significant....
Griz:
Sorry, I should have stated I have the F658GS... with the deeper travel of the F800GS I'm not surprised that you see a bigger difference!

I like the idea of a check to be sure the rear wheel has no tracking error...
I was considering the idea of one of those laser toys
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Old 05-28-2010, 08:49 AM   #21
The Griz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden
Griz:
Sorry, I should have stated I have the F658GS... with the deeper travel of the F800GS I'm not surprised that you see a bigger difference!

I like the idea of a check to be sure the rear wheel has no tracking error...
I was considering the idea of one of those laser toys
I told my service guy a my local shop that I was thinking about buying one of those laser alignment tools. He laughed and said "don't do it. Just use measuring calipers and measure equally on both sides. That's what we do at the shop."

I agree with him. My alignment is never off and it's way cheaper!
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Old 05-28-2010, 04:32 PM   #22
Too Many Toys
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Without agreeing or disagreeing on the method & correct amount of slack, I'll only say that my new 800GS's chain was tight as a fiddle string from the factory. WAY too tight. Loosened it up as soon as I got home. IMO, a little loose is better then too tight.

(I think you guys put way more thought & time in to chain adjustment then I'm willing to do)
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Old 05-29-2010, 02:40 AM   #23
OldCrock
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Chain tension

My Ozi 00.2c worth.
I feel it is better to go for the looser measurement because the chain can and will get tighter when it gets mud on it. I have set off with nice clean properly adjusted chain and had to loosen it mid ride due to build up of mud. The chain has become very tight and I've been too worried about the possible damage it might do.
I think that is why BMW have the variable range of approx 10mm
Anyhow, do what you feel comfortable with.
I have also found that I get chain slap and transmission lash if the chain isnt just right. Sometime its a juggling act to find what suits your bike and riding conditions.

Cheers
Oldcrock
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:55 PM   #24
PackMule
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David, thanks for checking. I've been meaning to do it myself but you've saved me the trip.
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Old 06-20-2010, 06:47 AM   #25
Tor
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Thanks for all the info. The only thing I don't like is that when checking chain tension, the chain actually hits the lower plastic chain rail and still be within tension spec. I am sure I am not the only one having the chain slapping up against the lower plastic chain rail while riding in bumpy terrain. I assume this is normal....
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