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Old 04-06-2011, 06:32 PM   #31
Ducksbane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX View Post
Dang... I was interested until I realized it would be a pain to put on with the hand guards and I don't really want to keep it on the bike all the time...
Its really easy to get on with barkbusters ... just undo the end and slip it on!

It doesn't get in the way when you aren't using it, it just sits there out of the way. It's also very light.

Really ... whats not to like?
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Old 04-08-2011, 04:52 AM   #32
FredRydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX View Post
Dang... I was interested until I realized it would be a pain to put on with the hand guards and I don't really want to keep it on the bike all the time...
It's much easier to put on than the more expensive solutions (except the clamp, above). I have OEM handguards, and the o-ring stays on the grip. When I want to "lock" the throttle when on the interstate, I just roll it rightwards into the gap with my throttle hand. I actually returned a Wunderlich throttle lock once I discovered the Caterpillar solution.

I wonder: is the o-ring is stretchable to lock the front brake when picking up the bike? I use a velcro strap for that.

Fred
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:22 AM   #33
a57m2000
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Be aware of potential weather conditions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oddward View Post
I would be happy to ride with anyone part or all of the trip. Leaving here August 20th. If you wish to meet in Yellowstone for a day, or anywhere along the rout i'm sure we can meet up.
One year we were snowed in the mid August in Yellowstone. Beartooth Highway to Red Lodge is awesome, as well as many other roads around. One might say that Yellowstone itself is a tourist trap with a lots of traffic, and still visible damage after huge forest fires.

I would second KISS - credit card, cell phone with Verizon /city stuff - AT&T and T mobile rarely have meaningful range/ and 45LC revolver for a piece of mind. Throttle lock, tire repair kit, towing service.
Less stuff better, and since you would be covering quite long stretches of road you may not have enough time to explore true off-road. Gravel roads you can do with any 90/10% tires.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:00 AM   #34
Flashback
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I'm a proponent of KISS. Keep it simple, minimize gear but maintain a focus on safety, and keep it light. I usually lmfao at these videos of "adventurers" with their chase vehicles and bikes overloaded with gear they will never use. No reason at all to go on a motorcycle ride like that if you have a head on your shoulders plan your route in advance. OK maybe there is a reason if you are blazing your own trail in places like Borne but for most riders it's overkill. Beyond detracting significantly from the "motorcycling" experience, traveling like that is completely unnecessary in most circumstances limits where you can take your bike.

I do a most of my riding solo, including adventures into the wilderness, and about once a year do a trip of around 6,000 miles. More gear means more problems period.

Credit card, cell phone, basic tool kit, basic first aid kit, emergency road service, tire repair kit, parts that you know will need changing on your trip such as oil filters, maybe some extra fluid, and a good riding suit. That's all you need. If you are camping bring only the gear you need...for instance in many areas tents are just excess baggage and can be done without.

A good riding suit is probably the only thing you absolutely must purchase. Comfort in the heat, cold, and rain makes or breaks a ride and good armor makes or breaks your health and safety in a quick stop incident. ATGATT.

It's also good practice to know how to field repair your bike. Before you travel, take it apart, put it back together, get to know it's guts and how to do basic maintenance on it's guts on the trail or side of the road. Learn how to change a tire in the dirt. Those sorts of things. If you can't fix minor problems with your own bike, you shouldn't leave home.

I'm on the fence about a gun. Guns are useful, especially if you hit an animal on the road or trail and need to put it down or are spending extended amounts of time in places where you may want to hunt for your food. But guns can also get you into trouble, especially while traveling in dangerous areas. I'd say that if you deem it useful to carry a gun you should also be very competent in it's handling and use. I usually just carry a small can of mace in my tank bag. Never had to use the mace.

Travel smart, don't travel overloaded.
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Old 04-08-2011, 03:42 PM   #35
inmate-n00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiTown View Post
Option A:
Long miles, little bit of dirt... K60 rear Shinko, 700 front. The rear should be good for 4000 miles minimum, most people report more it seems, the Shinko is good for 6000+ miles. A decent compromise.
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thx for this summary!
the choices are maddening....
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Old 04-08-2011, 04:07 PM   #36
Oddward OP
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Simplicity and low weight are at the top of my priority list. I am an avid backpacker (or at least used to before my son was born) used to packing light as possible. This being my first long motorcycle trip, I imagine many of the same ideals apply. On the bike however, I don't have to scrutinize every ounce quite as much. I may even pack a few small luxuries like deodorant and toothpaste instead of a one ounce ziplock bag of baking soda (it does work for both remarkably well btw).

I have a good idea of what I will need for me. The difference is what will the bike need. The replies here have been wonderful and extremely helpful. Many I will use. Everyone has their list of tools and parts to drag along. I will invest in an Airhawk, (ty Chitown) and some form of throttle lock. The Cat ring looks rather good, but curious how easy it disengages and how much it hinders quick decelerations.

Other questions linger. For example, how well does the FI system compensate for the change in elevation. Going from low to high. I've read of a few BMW's that did not. In that case should I bring an extra plug incase it fouls? Or, The trip is in August going through five or six dusty states. Total miles round trip near 6k. Will the air filter be good though out the trip if I clean it right before the trip or should I bring a small bottle of cleaner and oil?

Small thoughts and questions. Perhaps I am way over thinking this. I know I cannot and do not want to plan/pack for every eventuality. I like a light bike. Not one where you insert drive between the luggage.
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Old 04-08-2011, 04:15 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodWorks View Post
A credit card and a cell phone.

Seriously. It sounds like you've already taken care of the basics, and it's not like you're riding across Inner Mongolia. Relax, and have a great time!
Ditto and a good friend back home to get parts to you asap if no dealer is close by.
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:55 PM   #38
Oddward OP
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Originally Posted by SQD8R View Post
Ditto and a good friend back home to get parts to you asap if no dealer is close by.
I know, I am a bit obsessive. I am a firm believer in "Prior proper planning..." and all those "P's" that go along with it. I do like that idea about a friend back home. Had not thought of that.
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Old 04-08-2011, 10:25 PM   #39
Bayner
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Originally Posted by Oddward View Post
Other questions linger. For example, how well does the FI system compensate for the change in elevation. Going from low to high. I've read of a few BMW's that did not. In that case should I bring an extra plug incase it fouls? Or, The trip is in August going through five or six dusty states. Total miles round trip near 6k. Will the air filter be good though out the trip if I clean it right before the trip or should I bring a small bottle of cleaner and oil?
You won't have problems with the altitude changes. I have been very surprised how well the bike handles those situations. Your stock paper type filter will likely be fine for the duration of the trip. If you're thinking of getting a foam or alternative filter anyways, it won't hurt to install it before you head out, knowing you can service it if need be. (It's pretty easy to find a garage with some solvent and a squirt of clean oil to get you rolling again.)

Don't worry too much, just get out there and put some miles on. There's still a lot of decent folks out there that will give you a hand if you've overlooked something or are in a jam.
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:47 AM   #40
inmate-n00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oddward View Post

Other questions linger. For example, how well does the FI system compensate for the change in elevation. Going from low to high. I've read of a few BMW's that did not. In that case should I bring an extra plug incase it fouls? Or, The trip is in August going through five or six dusty states. Total miles round trip near 6k. Will the air filter be good though out the trip if I clean it right before the trip or should I bring a small bottle of cleaner and oil?
being a backpacker will help. you already know about compression bags, setting up a tent in the rain, etc.

you're over thinking the other stuff, lol.
the bmw FI will be fine.
it's a good idea to check your air filter for replacement before and after you leave, though.
depending on the mileage of your bike do a throttle body sync to before you leave, too.

go on small trips to prepare for the big one.
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