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Old 06-04-2011, 02:52 AM   #31
tserts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
basically they are advocating evaporation, which is pretty much the only way to cool yourself once the air temperature is higher than your skin temperature (roughly 93 degrees, not 98).


See this following article from the Ironbutt Magazine: http://www.ironbutt.com/ibmagazine/I..._62-66_Hot.pdf

Depending on your jacket, you'll probably need a vent or two open to get the evaporative effect, regardless of what the LDComfort people say.
That's well worth a repost, thanks Phork...

Very well written, motorbike specific, and thoroughly informed. If you haven't already, do read it.
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Old 06-04-2011, 05:38 AM   #32
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You may want consider a camelbak filled with ice and water. Wear this UNDER your jacket. Provides cooling and hydration.
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Old 06-04-2011, 07:04 AM   #33
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Mesh is BAD when it's hot!!!

From the link posted above:

Conventional wisdom is that mesh riding suits are best suited for such conditions because they maximize airflow over the skin. However, for the reasons explained below, maximum air flow is not what you need under these conditions.

Above 93°F, it’s a different world. The wind is no longer your friend.
For long distance riding in temperature higher than 93°F, you need to
(1) minimize your body’s exposure to direct wind blast;
(2) wear wicking undergarments, including a helmet liner;
(3) carry an adequate supply of cool water and drink frequently; and
(4) insulate any parts of your body expos



I take it a step further and wear a soaked shirt under my VENTED (not mesh) Jacket.
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Old 06-04-2011, 08:40 AM   #34
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If you're looking for jeans, Aerostich sells some now. THey have arborwear pants, heavy Carhart style canvas pants with double layers in the lower front legs and seat, and optional knee pads, and they sell a style of denim jeans with designed in pockets to fit knee pads in- when you get where you're going, you can unzip them and pull the kneepads out in a few seconds.

Aerostich Protekt Riding Jeans

Aerostich Arborwear canvas pants

Not that either of those will feel like an awesome "hot weather" solution.

There are also new RoadCrafter Light and Ultralight suits for urban riding.

Personally, I've got some Olympia mesh gear that I'm pretty happy with for what we call "hot weather" in Oregon, which is anything above 80F.
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Old 06-04-2011, 08:53 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoodward View Post
... what we call "hot weather" in Oregon, which is anything above 80F.


That's hot?

We get those temps in December!
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Old 06-04-2011, 04:56 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Road Cowboy View Post


That's hot?

We get those temps in December!
He did say Oregon.
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Old 06-07-2011, 06:02 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by island808 View Post
So how about gear brand recommendations.

I've usually used first gear brand. Seems a lot more durable. gets good reviews, cheaper than the expensive stuff, better than the cheap stuff (olympia for instance).
I use both firstgear and olympia, and neither really is significantly better than the other. FG actually has more budget priced (and budget quality) items than Olympia does.

They are in the same category with their top-end stuff.

Sidi for boots, Spidi is a different company.

You need to have a budget in mind or you're going to get suggestions for $1k jackets on up. If that's fine with you, then roll on.
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Old 06-07-2011, 07:01 AM   #38
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I had Olympia gear in my crash. It performed exactly as desired. There was not a scratch on me and the back pad prevented my spine from being snapped.

I replaced it with the BMW Airshell. I prefer this jacket because I got the optional back armor and it is clearly a more rugged piece of kit. There is more cordura and stiching seems a lot more robust. The mesh doesn't look like it will burn through as quickly, although that wasn't an issue with my crash. Still, I would not hesitate to use Olympia again.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:26 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffy109 View Post

I replaced it with ...

The mesh doesn't look like it will burn through as quickly, although that wasn't an issue with my crash.
When I was doing research for riding gear one of the things I kept seeing in post-crash testimonials on most of the gear were statements regarding "I replaced it with . . ."

that was up until I read the testimonials on the suit I purchased. These were different.

The owners raved about how the gear survived, or, was only cosmetically damaged, and in the worst cases may have needed a small repair. This was completely different from everything else I had reviewed.

I rather liked the idea of not having to sacrifice a suit should a get-off be in my cards.

It's also nice, when the Kevlar weave won't burn through at all in a slide, not having to concern myself about how quickly will the nylon mesh or Cordura burn through.

I really don't understand why more manufacturers aren't using materials better suited (pun intended) to the purpose of the gear.

The suit I wear will protect me and survive. Even if I do manage to damage it, the manufacturer will repair it.

Considering the cost of protective gear, what are the advantages of paying a premium price for a one-time-use item?

Regardless of what anyone purchases, this Save Your Hide page is worth a read, just to better understand the materials used in various gear out there.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:43 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
...
It's also nice, when the Kevlar weave won't burn through at all in a slide, not having to concern myself about how quickly will the nylon mesh or Cordura burn through.
...
You should read the "hot and humid motoport review" thread.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:52 AM   #41
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Just a thought, but if your one leg is etting a lot of heat in just one area, why not look for some sort of foil type heat sheild that you can velcro on or something?

Perhaps one of the smaller tarps from these guys might help, you could cut and hem as needed.
http://www.weldshield.com/

Again, thinking outside the box.
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:28 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lurkie View Post
You should read the "hot and humid motoport review" thread.
Got a link to it?

After 20 years in an Aerostich Roadcrafter, the Motoport Mesh has been a blessing in the Texas heat and humidity.
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:56 AM   #43
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BMG (Belstaff) "Adventure" Jacket with zip on hydration system is far and away the best Hot weather Jacket I have ever used (or seen)
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:42 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
Got a link to it?

After 20 years in an Aerostich Roadcrafter, the Motoport Mesh has been a blessing in the Texas heat and humidity.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=685652

Regardless of the material, a mesh jacket that flows lots of air does more harm than good over 93-95 degrees.
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:51 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
Regardless of the material, a mesh jacket that flows lots of air does more harm than good over 93-95 degrees.

^^^ This ^^^
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