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Old 09-07-2011, 12:31 AM   #1
treborkooc OP
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Eh? Remap F800GS for regular gas?

I am trying to decide whether to remap my BMW F800GS for my trip from USA to Argentina?

What is the availability of premium gas on this journey?

What do you think I should do?
1) Remap the bike
2) Do not remap the bike, take some octance booster and remap the bike along the way if needed.

Thanks guys!
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Old 09-07-2011, 01:12 AM   #2
crashmaster
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Remap the bike now and use premium when you can get it. Premium fuel is tough to find in many places, and even then it can have a lot of ethanol. Octane booster cannot be found in most places. Even using octane booster will not help much if the fuel is poor.

I ran my KTM 990 on the low octane ignition map almost full time on a 50,000 miles trip through the Americas, and even then, I would occasionally get some knocking.

You will be running some particularly bad petrol in Peru and Bolivia.

There is ride report on here about 2 800 GS's traveling together in Peru that destroyed both of the engines at the identical time due to bad fuel. I dont know if they had the low octane map or not though.
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:52 AM   #3
Johnnydarock
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The ride report that Crash is referring to is by Betitolara from Canada. They had their F800GS's remapped and when both of their bike started having engine trouble at the same time in Peru it was initially blamed on the remapping...but later was blamed on getting a tank full of kerocene mixed gas. It pays to always check the color of the gas you get from the guys along side the road. Both their bikes were remapped and they were not having problems before that incident. That being said...I have a new F800GS and I dream of doing a trip to TDF and would not remap it. That's just me.
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Old 09-07-2011, 07:26 AM   #4
Animo
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BMW Germany told them that the F800gs cannot be remapped and could not figure out how BMW Canada remapped the bikes or if they really did. It was a great ride report BTW.
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:11 AM   #5
crashmaster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supa12 Pilot View Post
BMW Germany told them that the F800gs cannot be remapped and could not figure out how BMW Canada remapped the bikes or if they really did. It was a great ride report BTW.
Thats intersting, I think I remember reading something about that. I didnt realize they got gasoline mixed with diesel. That would kill any motor, even a KLR. Are dealers remapping the ignition curve only, with a home grown map?

My KTM 990 has two positions for the ignition curve that can be changed by disconnecting one wire beneath the seat. I rigged mine up with a switch so I can do it on the fly. Using regular gas I would get pinging almost all the time on the normal map, so I ran it in the low octane map most of the time.

Johnny mentioned that he would not remap. If BMW Germany knows nothing about a low octane map, I would probably not do it either in light of that. However, I am not familiar with the twin rotax. What does it say in the owners manual as far as fuel octane rating?

The following is from my personal experience so YMMV. You will find premium in quite a few places in Mexico and Central America depending on your route. If youre on the main highways, it wont be a problem, but if you get off the major highway routes there, all you find is regular. Its much the same in quite a few countries in South America. On the major highways, you will find premium in many places, off the main highways, no. Heck, in Argentina many times I was lucky to find a gas station that had any fuel at all.

In Peru and Bolivia, regularly at higher elevations, all I could find was 80 or 84 octane, but I was riding in some pretty remote places where I would also regularly fill up with barrel or milk jug gas which was at times, very poor quality. However, I would get some pinging oftentimes even using premium when I could find it. Locals in several countries told me that some petrol stations would cut the premium with regular gas, or try to sell straight regular gas as premium, so take that for what its worth.

So, if there does exist a BMW approved low octane map, personally, I would use it because you are going to be running some very low octane fuel at times. But if there is only a home grown map that certain dealers will flash for you, then I would probably pass on that as I imagine it would void your warranty.

I dont know how long or how many miles you plan on traveling. If youre not on an extended trip like I was, maybe carrying some booster to use for when you really need it may be the thing to do. You will still need plenty of it even if youre only running a 17,000 mile trip. However, booster doesnt get you much more octane, but sometimes maybe just enough.

But like said, I'm just not familiar enough with the twin rotax.
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Old 09-08-2011, 06:48 AM   #6
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It was pretty obvious they bought tainted fuel on the side of an isolated road in the middle of nowhere. At the same rate they managed to have their bikes fixed as "good will" at BMW.

I believe the F800gs is 91 RON, as you said, it is easily found in Mexico and main highways in Central and SA, but off the beaten path it could be tricky if not impossible to find.

My Super Tenere has a stupidly high octane rating, they state 95, but I still cannot figure out if that is a RON rating. It seems to run great on our 92, but does knock on our lower 87 octane.

I still wander how much octane the octane boosters provide. I hope they boost enough octane for my bike, if not I would have a difficult time leaving my back yard, not all stations in Mexico have the 92 premium none the less further South.
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Old 09-08-2011, 04:44 PM   #7
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I would guess the rating for your Super Tenere would be RON as AKI 95, if it does exist is found only in a very few places.

For those not familiar with RON vs. AKI ratings, the US and Mexico use the same AKI (anti-knock index) octane rating. The other countries in the Americas use RON (research octane number)

RON 95 = AKI 91

RON 91 = AKI 87

Many places in the Americas you will only find RON 91/AKI 87 And, quite often, especially in Peru an Bolivia, generally in higher elevations, you will only find RON 84, which interestingly enough, is also leaded fuel.

IIRC, the BMW 1200GS has an anti-knock sensor which automatically retards the timing, nice feature. I'm surprised the F800 doesnt have this as well.

Like I mentioned before, The KTM 950/990 has 2 different ignition maps to select from, one for RON 95/AKI 91 and one for gasoline simply described as "less than 95/91." Seemed to work well enough in my travels most of the time.
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Old 09-13-2011, 07:06 AM   #8
Animo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crashmaster View Post
For those not familiar with RON vs. AKI ratings, the US and Mexico use the same AKI (anti-knock index) octane rating. The other countries in the Americas use RON (research octane number)

RON 95 = AKI 91

RON 91 = AKI 87

Many places in the Americas you will only find RON 91/AKI 87 And, quite often, especially in Peru an Bolivia, generally in higher elevations, you will only find RON 84, which interestingly enough, is also leaded fuel.
Thanks CrashMaster, now it finally makes sense. (I think I am phfuked )
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:37 AM   #9
betitolara
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Originally Posted by Johnnydarock View Post
.but later was blamed on getting a tank full of kerocene mixed gas. It pays to always check the color of the gas you get from the guys along side the road.
Hello all,
Whoever said that we put gasoline mixed with kerosene or diesel is just assuming things or just lying. We stopped at a gas station and put 'gasolina' in both bikes (there was even a local moto fueling-up gas before us). The diesel pump was a few meters away from the gasoline pumps. Unless you are an expert in gas 'color' you'll never really know for sure what gas is good or not. I can tell you that I saw more than 10 different colors of gasoline from country to country (some red, blue, green, brown, transparent, yellow, and variations of dark and clear tones) not only that but the 'smells' also varied a lot.

Yes, both bikes had the remap option done prior delivery, according to our local BMW dealer anyways, but unfortunately this can't be verified b/c our dealer is saying that BMW Canada took away their privileges to check this or do any more fuel remaps.

I know of at least two other F8GS engines failing very similarly in countries where gas is supposed to be 'good' (Canada/USA) so not until these broken engines are studied by BMW we'll never really know the exact reason of their catastrophic failure (everything else is pure assumptions).

Cheers fellas,
Alberto.
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