ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-26-2012, 05:57 PM   #1
AnOddWorld OP
n00b
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Bullhead City, Arizona
Oddometer: 2
1985 Kawasaki

Hello everyone, I'm very new and very interested in motorcycling.

At any rate, I've never ridden a bike but I've been doing research, such as taking a course by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation here in Arizona. My dad was a biker in the 80's, but I remember him slowly getting rid of his bikes in the 90's, save one.

This one bike was known to me the old street bike we had, he left it to my mother when they separated.

This bike, now a 1985 Kawasaki GPz 750 Turbo, a rare bike as I'm beginning to learn.

I don't know much about motorcycles or riding, but was wondering if restoring this bike would be better alternative to buying a smaller, newer, but still used bike to learn on. (such as a Ninja 250r) With either option I'm looking to spend maybe 2k-4k.

It's not in too bad of a shape, at least I don't think. (Looks can be deceiving, right?)

AnOddWorld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 06:10 PM   #2
Tosh Togo
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Oddometer: 1,594
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOddWorld View Post
Hello everyone, I'm very new and very interested in motorcycling.

...I don't know much about motorcycles or riding, but was wondering if restoring this bike would be better alternative to buying a smaller, newer, but still used bike to learn on. (such as a Ninja 250r)...
For many reasons, the answer is no, it's NOT a good first bike.
Tosh Togo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 07:15 PM   #3
cam14
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Texas
Oddometer: 161
Just sharing my opinion at a person nearly 50 years old and started riding in the 3rd grade and I have my own kids whom I am teaching to ride. Keep the 750 Turbo as a super cool bike to restore and maybe ride later. And get a smaller, lighter, less powerful bike to enjoy the art and skill of riding and maintaining a motorcycle. Im personally a big fan of thumpers (single cylinders), and riding off road. But there are many styles of bike to fit a diverse set of personalities and local conditions.

Hope this helps and best of luck to you
cam14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 07:51 PM   #4
P 0 P E Y E
Bald rider
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: southern Connecticut U S A
Oddometer: 113
Many layers to this onion.

Let's start with the 1985 bike...the fuel system may be a real challenge if the fuel is decades old. What ever you do, don't attempt to start it before you completely drain, inspect and clean the entire fuel system.

Are you handy or all thumbs? If your not comfortable with taking things apart, understanding how the work (after looking or reading) then this bike might be better as a trade toward a rebel.

You going to have to do some work to get this bike running and some tinkering to keep it running.

Next...learning to ride is easy for some and a disaster for others. Look into a safety course.
P 0 P E Y E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 08:09 PM   #5
scrambler73
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: where I am supposed to be.....
Oddometer: 113
I agree that the 750 turbo is not a good bike to start on... Actually, for sooo many reasons its a TERRIBLE first bike.

I just spent a week riding around on my friends 750 Turbo (identical to the one in the pic above, but in absolute showfloor condition), These bikes are VERY big-bore two strokeish. On more than one ocassion while the engine was coming on boost, the rear wheel spun up. Good fun if you expect it, but not so cool for a rookie.

These bikes are pretty freaking fast (just shy of 100hp), but really show their age in handling, braking...


The other reasons are "mechanical" .

Being fuel injected/computer controlled is a great thing, and if dialed in, they are pretty sweet.. But they are also prone to glitches, which can drive a guy nuts.

I love the idea of starting on a thumper/dual sport of some sort. Even a DRZ400 is docile enough for a new rider and is great both on/off road.


If I was closer to you, I'd try to talk you into selling me your Turbo, but really I think you should "KEEP IT" as when the time comes, that bike will become a very special "toy" to you. Not just because your dad owned it, but because it is THE BEST turbo bike ever produced, and is such a fun bike to ride.
__________________
Electric start?
scrambler73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 09:59 PM   #6
AnOddWorld OP
n00b
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Bullhead City, Arizona
Oddometer: 2
Thanks guys, all input is appreciated. I'm going to sign up for a course and see how well riding comes to me.

Looking into this bike, reading about it, and simply looking at it from a different perspective, I'm falling in love with it.

And yearn for the day I hear that engine roar to life!
AnOddWorld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2012, 07:14 AM   #7
hrolf
neophyte
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: city on a hill
Oddometer: 237
Get a starter bike, see if riding's your thing.

If it is, start restoring the turbo -- by the time you've got it to mint, you'll probably have a few thousand miles on your working bike, and will be better equipped to deal with it.

Take the ERC on the turbo after 18 months of riding a more sane first bike.
__________________
the leader must not fall.
hrolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2012, 01:44 PM   #8
Pigford
British
 
Pigford's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: North Dorset, UK
Oddometer: 927
Just sold one - bit of a barge for a first bike, not silly fast, but can catch you unawares on damp/greasy roads.......

Here it is from last autumn before I sold it:



The turbo doesn't start to ramp up until about 4000 rpm and its only a "manufacturers declared bhp" of 112bhp from NEW. Quite a rare machine and going up in value - the best Jap Factory Turbo by a mile

If its been sitting for a few years will need a lot of TLC to make roadworthy... brakes, valve seals? rings/bores? clutch stuck?

As already said, get something else to ride & gain experience whilst you spend time (& money) fixing the Turbo up.
Pigford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2012, 05:22 PM   #9
don-vee
Adventurer
 
don-vee's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: The dead coal city of Wilkes-Barre, PA
Oddometer: 91
Definitely pretty hairy for a first scoot! Please do yourself a favor and get something a bit more manageable to learn on. I certainly hate hearing about riders who ended up on the wrong side of the pavement (or a car grille) because they bit off more than they could chew, and there's been a LOT of them around here.
don-vee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:03 AM   #10
concours
WFO for 41 years
 
concours's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Kensington, NH USA
Oddometer: 5,376
as was gently suggester in another post... as a newbie, you WILL tip over. Get a somewhat rustic dual sport for a first bike, pracrice your skills on something PRE-DUMPED, ride a bit off road to learn how to do well on the road. To dump that rare survivor GPZ Turbo would be a travesty.
__________________
Too much is just barely enough.....
concours is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014