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Old 03-03-2012, 10:54 AM   #31
HenryFL OP
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Well it's not just me, I've been at the custom exhaust fabricator and they have been drilling for an hour and gotten nowhere.

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Old 03-03-2012, 11:43 AM   #32
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I'm surprised no one has said this yet. Just use left hand (counter clockwise) drill bits. Drill VERY slow speed. I NEVER drill a broken bolt without a left hand drill bit. (Unless it's a left hand thread bolt.)
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:45 PM   #33
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Took three hours. They broke at least 8 bits and an extractor. They ended up having to beat and cut the whole area out and mig a nut in there. It was a complete mess. It's put back together now but not the best looking job. My advice - if you break a bolt on your exhaust, try to drill it out but don't spend weeks and countless bits like I did and destroy all up. If it does not go well on the first couple of bits, grind around the whole problem (in the soft steel) and have someone weld in a nut for $20.

Also be careful of the dealer - they wanted 2 hrs @ $95 each to fix it. For which I could almost have just bought a slip on.
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Old 03-03-2012, 07:24 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Molly View Post
Bought two expensive Dewalt specialty bits that state on the package, made for hardened steel, girders, and stainless. I may as well have used a gummy bear. They did nothing. Also disintegrated two dremel pointed grinder bits. I think I may glue the bolt head back on and live with the other two screws holding it, which they seem to do fine.
Were they the tungsten bits i put in my picture, or something "similar"...?
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Old 03-03-2012, 07:25 PM   #35
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Eek

So what was the explanation? Was the bolt made of Tungsten? Weird.

I have seen huge chunks of copper silver soldered together, we tried to separate the two blocks but it was impossible. Had to use a mill to see how they were fastened together. Had to take a huge amount of heat to solder 1" thick copper together.
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D.T. screwed with this post 03-03-2012 at 07:32 PM
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:56 AM   #36
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So what was the explanation? Was the bolt made of Tungsten? Weird.

I have seen huge chunks of copper silver soldered together, we tried to separate the two blocks but it was impossible. Had to use a mill to see how they were fastened together. Had to take a huge amount of heat to solder 1" thick copper together.

No, they are stainless bolts, when someone unfamiliar with it's ability to work harden begins drilling, THAT causes the hardness. The proper way is, SHARP cobalt bit, turn it slow and feed it hard so it's cutting rather than slipping. I worked on food processing machinery for years (all stainless) and watched this very same debacle unfold time after time.
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Old 03-04-2012, 04:25 AM   #37
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Very very easy to drill out hard bolts................simply use a cheap and easily available masonry drill.
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Old 03-04-2012, 06:23 AM   #38
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No, they are stainless bolts, when someone unfamiliar with it's ability to work harden begins drilling, THAT causes the hardness. The proper way is, SHARP cobalt bit, turn it slow and feed it hard so it's cutting rather than slipping. I worked on food processing machinery for years (all stainless) and watched this very same debacle unfold time after time.
This is correct. There is no need for special bits on stainless, unless you screw it up in the beginning.

Concours: Before I spent a stint working nuclear machinery (all stainless) I used to install food processing lines. From individual pieces of equipment to entire new multi line plants. It's amazing how easy stainless is to work once you "get it". And it's amazing just how screwed up an apprentice can make something when they don't "get it."
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:37 AM   #39
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This is correct. There is no need for special bits on stainless, unless you screw it up in the beginning.

Concours: Before I spent a stint working nuclear machinery (all stainless) I used to install food processing lines. From individual pieces of equipment to entire new multi line plants. It's amazing how easy stainless is to work once you "get it". And it's amazing just how screwed up an apprentice can make something when they don't "get it."
ASME section III experience here as well. ...and Neo-Lube is your friend! http://www.newmantools.com/chemicals/neolube1pds.htm
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:21 PM   #40
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Very very easy to drill out hard bolts................simply use a cheap and easily available masonry drill.
Per several of my posts above, I destroyed at least 5 masonry, tile, glass, and spade bits on this screw.
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:23 PM   #41
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No, they are stainless bolts, when someone unfamiliar with it's ability to work harden begins drilling, THAT causes the hardness. The proper way is, SHARP cobalt bit, turn it slow and feed it hard so it's cutting rather than slipping. I worked on food processing machinery for years (all stainless) and watched this very same debacle unfold time after time.
You are right. I am mechanically skilled, however, I started with cruddy bits and absolutely work hardened the thing straight away.
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:59 PM   #42
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Per several of my posts above, I destroyed at least 5 masonry, tile, glass, and spade bits on this screw.

Were you using a drill running at less than 100rpm, and were you careful not to run at any higher speeds than that, which would result in a stainless bolt work hardening, which would then make it very difficult to remove by drilling, and mean that weld/mole wrench method would need to be used?
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:23 AM   #43
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work_hardening
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Old 03-06-2012, 01:06 PM   #44
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Were they the tungsten bits i put in my picture, or something "similar"...?
That pic is a tungsten carbide burr, and when used in a Dremel/high speed air die grinder will simply wash away any bolt-stainless or not. It does take a little technique, in that you do not stick a running burr or mounted stone point into a hole that's a bit bigger than the burr. If you do, it is likely to ricochet around and shatter--happens instantly.
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Old 03-06-2012, 01:10 PM   #45
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ASME section III experience here as well. ...and Neo-Lube is your friend! http://www.newmantools.com/chemicals/neolube1pds.htm

"Neolube No. 1 is NOT RECOMMENDED FOR LUBRICATING THREADS IN THE REACTOR PRIMARY CONTAINMENT AREAS, where operating temperatures for the fittings are greater than 400F. Neolube No. 650 is recommended for use in containment and/or secondary side in nuclear applications."

Gotta be careful. Have seen a lot of seized bolts from using No.1. Fel-Pro N-5000 is far better.
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