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Old 03-02-2012, 12:20 PM   #166
ScramblerTom
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Originally Posted by Lone Rider View Post
Why do you think later years will be less than best? How do you see them degrading?
OK - I just started reading this thread I have to chime in already - I agree that your 20s are your best - I'm only mid 30s and my fitness level and general accumulation of injuries has meant that I can't do much of what I would like - I wrecked my back a few years back and cut half my thumb off last year, I developed ulcers two years ago in a stressful job and they have not gone away, and I suffer from weak joints that are slowly degenerating. Plus family also gets in the way about now - so if single and under 30 quit your job get something seasonal or "freelance - go travel, live cheap, and then come back and find contract jobs.

I was a grad student in my 20s and that was pretty awesome, went to Europe all the time, sailed my boat and generally loafed around - back then I was a flyfishermen and not a rider but it amounted to the same thing - 8 years of pretty awesome laidback lifestyle. I'm married now with a 9-5 and that's not going to happen again - not that I regret my life choices - the ailing body kinda sucks.

I'm still having a good time but its way more structured than before
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Old 03-03-2012, 08:18 PM   #167
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I'm trying to figure this all out as well. I'm 58, and realizing that I lived my life based on what everyone else thought I should be striving for. The McMansion, etc. I have had a loveing wife,(40 yrs) who decided she needed to retire when the kids came. And Mom-in law decided kids should be sooner rather than later. So my Bikes went away, and I did the "right thing" and had kids and let the wife retire. Worked 2 and three jobs while completing an education so I could provide for the family. Worked for a company that didn't appreciate the fact that I am always there, ready to do a good job, and do it well (people die if I don't do it to perfection in my profession). But no one appreciates it. My collegues take time off ( call in sick when they aren't). I don't do that. But sometimes wonder why. Wife lets me have lots of freedom, but somehow there is always something in the way. I'm remodeling the kitchen as we speek. The only thing I really know is............There are all kinds of slavery. We Americans like to think of ourselves as free, buit we are slaves to our Mc Mansions,SUV payments,Credit cards and high Govt taxes. Find freedom while you can. It's not in the Bigger house, or more expensive car. It's what you can do with tomorrow, and what you did with yesterday. No one says on thier death bed, "wish i would have worked more, wish I had had a bigger house". It's wish I had done that and experienced that. You ever sit on the beach in Tel aviv, at night, watching the moon over the Med, sipping a nice glass of wine, after a ride through the Golan Heights in spring time? If not, you need to. As they say, Priceless. Or how about watch the lights downtown on the buildings in Lisbon, after a ride through Sintra and down the beach. Take in the music in Doolin, Ireland. There is too much for a life time, so you better start while you can.
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Old 03-04-2012, 05:44 PM   #168
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I called my customers three months before my one month trip and asked them to plan ahead for my absence. done.
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:09 PM   #169
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This will echo some of the previous comments…
Here is what has worked for my wife and I (together 16 years now). So far we`ve spent 4 of those 16 years traveling. First trip was backpacking around the world for a year in 1999-2000 and the second was motorcycling around the world from 2007 to 2010. We are currently planning the next trip which should occur in about 5 years once the newborn (6 weeks old) can wear a helmet (and sleep more than 2 hours at a time!) That trip should last about 2 to 4 years.
So how do we do it?
Well, first off we are not rich by North-American standards nor have we ever been. Our combined salary (both working very full-time) has never exceeded 6 figures (we came close only one year). Most of the time it has barely been half of that.
What we tend to do differently from those around us is that we minimize our spending. Most of our time together we have not owned a car. We do not take 2 or 3 week vacations that involve flying, we have no TV (so no cable fees), we live in a rather rundown neighborhood so rent is low, no iphone, no ipad, no facebook, no twitter, no movies at the cinema, very seldom do we go to the restaurant, half our clothing is from thrift stores, etc. And each time we take off for a long trip we sell everything we own except for souvenirs from past trips (I`ve done this 3 times now, wife twice)


We are not big fans of North-American culture (a very big reason the kid will be traveling at a young age if all goes well). And that dislike of many aspects of our culture means we have never been interested in doing what has been expected of us by society. And if you choose to reject conformity (with regards to consuming at least) you will very quickly discover that you end up saving whole bucketloads of money. The latest and greatest "thing" you are told you need just doesn't seem worth it anymore. Next thing you know you are dragging your bike out of the sand in some remote corner of the world while your wife is laughing at you (or crying in frustration, it can go either way sometimes).


The way we see it there are three options if you want to travel long term:
1-Be really wealthy and live the North-American lifestyle AND travel for extended periods (good luck but apparently it can be done)
2-Earn a regular salary and live the North-American lifestyle but NO long term travel.
3-Earn a regular salary but avoid pitfalls of North-American lifestyle AND travel for extended periods


You need to ask yourself what you really want; Life experience or stuff that simulates life experience. And you need to ask this question often (I certainly do) because there are some damn tempting toys out there that would certainly provide some temporary, albeit empty, feeling of fulfillment.
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Old 03-05-2012, 02:17 PM   #170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2uprtw View Post
So how do we do it?


We are not big fans of North-American culture... The latest and greatest "thing" you are told you need just doesn't seem worth it anymore. Next thing you know you are dragging your bike out of the sand in some remote corner of the world while your wife is laughing at you (or crying in frustration, it can go either way sometimes).


The way we see it there are three options if you want to travel long term:
1-Be really wealthy and live the North-American lifestyle AND travel for extended periods (good luck but apparently it can be done)
2-Earn a regular salary and live the North-American lifestyle but NO long term travel.
3-Earn a regular salary but avoid pitfalls of North-American lifestyle AND travel for extended periods


You need to ask yourself what you really want; Life experience or stuff that simulates life experience.
Interesting way to make "the trip[s]" happen, but there is a a way to have both the American Lifestyle and go see the world too. As the original posters question reads, "how is anyone able to manage the multi week trips let alone RTW trips. I have yet to read anyone considering the easiest way based on our "now" very connected society. It is possible to have all the accoutrements of the "North-American" lifestyle or any other lifestyle if you choose, and ride anywhere or as long as you want to.

The internet allows almost anyone who is really interested in traveling to make a fair if not above average living that would more than support or satisfy the lifestyle on the road. 20 years ago it was far more difficult. Today it is almost too easy. I personally take 8-12 weeks per year riding North America in 14-21 day stints. I enjoy the comforts of home after each trip and spend a few days planning my next section of the globe all the while managing a business I own with 40 employees from an I-pad and cloud computing. One of the guys I travel with is a sales rep for a window company. He sells 100% via the internet doing online presentations he sets up while traveling. Stopping for an hour to make an online presentation and make 10-12k in commissions 2-3 times per month aint a bad way to live. His income is well in the six figures. Another guy I ride with is a real estate agent. He lists large land tracts and million dollar properties and has his virtual assistant transaction coordinator do the daily paperwork while he is on the road with us. Next year we are going to do Europe down to South Africa in two three month stints- and work while we ride. I rode last year with a guy who writes code as an independent every night from his tent, motel, hostel, or any place he stays. He made far more than six figures for one job only.

Bottom line, choose a career path that allows you to telecommute from anywhere there is an internet connection and you can see the world the way you really want to, and with the lifestyle every reader of this post would envy.
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Motomochila screwed with this post 03-05-2012 at 02:25 PM
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Old 03-05-2012, 02:42 PM   #171
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Originally Posted by PeterW View Post
My father died and a good friend died within a couple of weeks - loads of long service leave - for some reason the 1-2 hit me quite hard.

Wife kicked me out of the house and told me not to come back until I wasn't "Mr Grumpy" any more.
Your father and a good friend die and your wife kicks you out of the house for being depressed? That's messed up.

It seems that the biggest obstacles to serious travel are wives, children, and mortgages. The soul-draining corporate job is just the means to finance that life.

If a guy had employable skills and avoided the aforementioned dream killers, worldwide travel couldn't be that far out of reach.

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Old 03-05-2012, 06:22 PM   #172
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[QUOTE=Motomochila;18143703

The internet allows almost anyone who is really interested in traveling to make a fair if not above average living that would more than support or satisfy the lifestyle on the road.

Bottom line, choose a career path that allows you to telecommute from anywhere there is an internet connection and you can see the world the way you really want to, and with the lifestyle every reader of this post would envy.[/QUOTE]

Very true. I went back to school last year to study translation (French to English) precisely so we could earn some income during the next trip. And the best part is you don't need to be earning big dollars to live comfortably while on the road.
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:13 PM   #173
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Originally Posted by Motomochila View Post
I
Bottom line, choose a career path that allows you to telecommute from anywhere there is an internet connection and you can see the world the way you really want to, and with the lifestyle every reader of this post would envy.
Nope... not me..... I don't envy you or your buddies AT ALL
When I'm off work & traveling - I'm off work & traveling.
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:23 PM   #174
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Here's what I did. I am currently retired as of this past February (at 43) and won't need to go back to work. I'm writing this from Thailand, taking a break and getting some sun before returning to Canada to plan the start of my round the world trip starting in April.

- Don't have kids. They will put you in the poor house. To enforce the issue and not waste ten years with girls who hope you will change your mind, get a vasectomy. End of discussion. I did it in 2007 and should have done it when I was 18 since I haven't changed my stance on this.
- Preferably, don't get married or stuck in a long term relationship. Yes, sex and companionship is fun, but you end up spending more money. Trust me. I was in one for 8 years. And a few shorter ones. Bad idea. Get a friends with benefits situation. The rules are clear and you can pursue your own goals.
- Save your money. All of it, or as much as you can. (I haven't owned a TV in 10 years, own 2 pairs of jeans and a few necessary suits for my previous work)
- Build a portfolio with a dividend stream so you get monthly cash flow. Reinvest the cash flow when it comes in. Don't buy IT and other crap that changes with the wind but stuff people need. Food, oil, clothes, telcos. Conservative is good with a low yield.
- Get a degree. Preferably two.
- Get a consulting gig, not a job. More money and it's more varied.
- Ignore "advise" from friends and relatives who've been brow-beaten by main stream media into a pattern of consumerist submission.
- Don't wait too long. I could have waited a few more years and made more money, increase my dividends etc. At some point you need to know when to stop and be able to live with what you have, plus a small savings factor. At some point, you get to "escape velocity" with regards to cashflow. When you reach that point, stop adding and live, wait things out.
- If you don't pursue your dreams you WILL regret it.
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Old 03-06-2012, 01:15 AM   #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motomochila View Post
Interesting way to make "the trip[s]" happen, but there is a a way to have both the American Lifestyle and go see the world too. As the original posters question reads, "how is anyone able to manage the multi week trips let alone RTW trips. I have yet to read anyone considering the easiest way based on our "now" very connected society. It is possible to have all the accoutrements of the "North-American" lifestyle or any other lifestyle if you choose, and ride anywhere or as long as you want to.

The internet allows almost anyone who is really interested in traveling to make a fair if not above average living that would more than support or satisfy the lifestyle on the road. 20 years ago it was far more difficult. Today it is almost too easy. I personally take 8-12 weeks per year riding North America in 14-21 day stints. I enjoy the comforts of home after each trip and spend a few days planning my next section of the globe all the while managing a business I own with 40 employees from an I-pad and cloud computing. One of the guys I travel with is a sales rep for a window company. He sells 100% via the internet doing online presentations he sets up while traveling. Stopping for an hour to make an online presentation and make 10-12k in commissions 2-3 times per month aint a bad way to live. His income is well in the six figures. Another guy I ride with is a real estate agent. He lists large land tracts and million dollar properties and has his virtual assistant transaction coordinator do the daily paperwork while he is on the road with us. Next year we are going to do Europe down to South Africa in two three month stints- and work while we ride. I rode last year with a guy who writes code as an independent every night from his tent, motel, hostel, or any place he stays. He made far more than six figures for one job only.

Bottom line, choose a career path that allows you to telecommute from anywhere there is an internet connection and you can see the world the way you really want to, and with the lifestyle every reader of this post would envy.
Um...




If it's so easy, please, inform us of all the details! Instead of bragging about your conquests here, start a thread and tell us all how to make 10-12k(which currency was that?), 2-3x/month differently than the alarming number of emails I get all the time "selling the secrets" to the same thing...

And while you're at it, please, tell us all how easy it is to "write code from our tent as an independent" in another thread...we're all envious, really...
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:11 AM   #176
Motomochila
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Originally Posted by hilslamer View Post
Um...




If it's so easy, please, inform us of all the details! Instead of bragging about your conquests here, start a thread and tell us all how to make 10-12k(which currency was that?), 2-3x/month differently than the alarming number of emails I get all the time "selling the secrets" to the same thing...

And while you're at it, please, tell us all how easy it is to "write code from our tent as an independent" in another thread...we're all envious, really...
Not bragging about my conquests, just my ability to find a way to live the life I always dreamed of. Have you tried looking for a job that allows internet/telecommuting? Probably not. For most people, its far easier to complain about not having, than actually doing something about having. But if you are truly interested, you can find a job that will allow you the freedom of travel and adventure while making a far better than "just making it" living.

A few years back, it was very easy to make over $10K as an online loan agent for every loan you sold via the internet .I used to own a loan company and made over 250k on internet sales of construction loans. Never met a single borrower, they were all in other states. I went riding after every closed deal. Selling internet web services for $500.00 commission per deal is what my internet provider sales rep makes. He sells 10-15 deals per month. I have no idea where he lives or does but we discussed his job and his interest in working from exotic spots around the globe.

As for the "coder". that's a no-brainer. If you know the language, you can write code from a yurt on an i-pad and send it off when you get service. I, sadly do not write code and must hire those guys occasionally myself. Ask any high-end web programer what they charge for a rewrite or integration. The guy who did my cloud computing integration charged me over $20k and it was completed in two weeks. He lives in Montreal. The coder who wrote my estimating software program did it on Excel and charged me $2500 for one days work. I hired him from a web clearing house of programers/coders. Would $20k work for you for a few weeks while your agent gets you another coding gig?

It really sounds as if you are angry that others have been able to find the ability to live the lifestyle you desire. Apparently you don't want it bad enough to find the way to make it work for you. Now if your wife/significant other/ kids/ dogs and cats, are keeping you from the life of the world traveler....well, I cant help you there. My wife/kids/dog wont let me.
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Old 03-06-2012, 01:32 PM   #177
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In my experience:

80% retired/semiretired
10% techies who can move in and out of contracts and jobs easily
10% blue collars who can also move in and out of jobs easier, particularly if they work for themselves
3% margin of error is reserved for standard office jobs that save up their vacation and "work something out"

This is for the US at least... I do think more people could get extra time off _without pay_, they just don't ask for it. Still, it is sort of depressing when you go to Horizon's Unlimited meeting and the youngest person there is late 40s. (I'm 31)

IMO, if you don't do it now, it probably won't happen. You will get married, have kids, and you probably will want to spend time with them - not going to Cambodia to dirtbike. Kids grow up, you have college costs, you retire - if you live long enough to retire - and realize that life is expensive and you don't have a regular job income anymore and staying in dingy hostels sharing a bathroom with a dozen dirty 20yo hippies and camping kinda sucks.

Not to mention that your experiences will be vastly different at that age. Chances are that you will not be in great shape anymore and you won't be taking 3 days off to trek to the top of some cool mountain in Nepal during your ride, or go skinny dipping with some skanky Dutch girls on vacation in Thailand, etc. Instead, you worry about your X medication/condition and how your kid is doing. Age will limit your experiences. Maybe your experience makes you wiser and you appreciate things more, but you will simply miss out on a lot of random stuff and stories.

The other problem is that the World is Getting Pretty Damn Flat. It is so cheap to fly these days that many places in the World are completely overrun with tourists and that corrupts local cultures. You will go to a lot of places and realize that the only reason why they ride elephants in Thailand or have a silk-weaving village or whatever is to get your tourist dollars and it's not like it was XX years ago when that is what they actually did. Even the poor people in the jungle watch CNN and MTV and it's just not the same and becoming worse and worse each year. In 20-30 years, even fewer authentic places will remain. My personal goal is to check out these cultures and peoples before their identity morphs into a random poor middle America neighborhood.

I don't know if there is a great solution to to your question, but one option is to do Fly & Rides. Fly out on Friday, spent a week riding, and come back Sunday. It is quite a decent option. You are not wasting time riding to get there, and you can cover quite a bit of ground and see a lot during that week. This is why I started a thread that you may find useful and that I hope more people will contribute to: Where in the world can you find cheap bike rentals?
A year later, I feel as strongly as ever about my observations above.

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Old 03-06-2012, 02:52 PM   #178
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I travelled for an extended period of time working for myself as a Web Marketer, it was fantastic, albeit much more difficult these days unfortunately due to all of the competition.
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Old 03-06-2012, 03:06 PM   #179
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Wow. I have to admit I want to do this but end up taking the easier route. But after all is said and done, it ends up being harder. Your child will thank you for the life you are giving them. You are offering a life like it should be lived.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2uprtw View Post
This will echo some of the previous comments…
Here is what has worked for my wife and I (together 16 years now). So far we`ve spent 4 of those 16 years traveling. First trip was backpacking around the world for a year in 1999-2000 and the second was motorcycling around the world from 2007 to 2010. We are currently planning the next trip which should occur in about 5 years once the newborn (6 weeks old) can wear a helmet (and sleep more than 2 hours at a time!) That trip should last about 2 to 4 years.
So how do we do it?
Well, first off we are not rich by North-American standards nor have we ever been. Our combined salary (both working very full-time) has never exceeded 6 figures (we came close only one year). Most of the time it has barely been half of that.
What we tend to do differently from those around us is that we minimize our spending. Most of our time together we have not owned a car. We do not take 2 or 3 week vacations that involve flying, we have no TV (so no cable fees), we live in a rather rundown neighborhood so rent is low, no iphone, no ipad, no facebook, no twitter, no movies at the cinema, very seldom do we go to the restaurant, half our clothing is from thrift stores, etc. And each time we take off for a long trip we sell everything we own except for souvenirs from past trips (I`ve done this 3 times now, wife twice)


We are not big fans of North-American culture (a very big reason the kid will be traveling at a young age if all goes well). And that dislike of many aspects of our culture means we have never been interested in doing what has been expected of us by society. And if you choose to reject conformity (with regards to consuming at least) you will very quickly discover that you end up saving whole bucketloads of money. The latest and greatest "thing" you are told you need just doesn't seem worth it anymore. Next thing you know you are dragging your bike out of the sand in some remote corner of the world while your wife is laughing at you (or crying in frustration, it can go either way sometimes).


The way we see it there are three options if you want to travel long term:
1-Be really wealthy and live the North-American lifestyle AND travel for extended periods (good luck but apparently it can be done)
2-Earn a regular salary and live the North-American lifestyle but NO long term travel.
3-Earn a regular salary but avoid pitfalls of North-American lifestyle AND travel for extended periods


You need to ask yourself what you really want; Life experience or stuff that simulates life experience. And you need to ask this question often (I certainly do) because there are some damn tempting toys out there that would certainly provide some temporary, albeit empty, feeling of fulfillment.
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:09 PM   #180
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MY Turn to Chime in...

I had a career in IT for 25years. As a result of layoffs and all of the the outsourcing and business consolidations, and through no fault of my own, my longest job in that field was just under 6 years. For some, you are not just a number to your employer and they understand and grant you the time. You have the money. You are blessed. Eight years ago, I made a career change and have never looked back. I am self-employed and to a very large degree, I am the master of my own time.

It will be 12 years this March that my younger brother died very unexpectedly. Brain aneurysm. Prob dead before he hit the ground. Since that time I've know three others that the same exact thing has happened to.

Last year, the guy I work with, his brother died unexpectedly. I do not know the cause. When we talked about it, we both looked at each other and said, You know, Life is Short. I told him I wanted to do some ADV rides, the TAT, Alaska, etc. And he said go do it, life is short. I told him the time requirements as my being away would load him with more responsibilities. He said You know, Life is Short, go do it.

To the OP, you are going to have to design your life in such a way that it allows you to do the things you want to do with......YOUR LIFE. Thats your answer. Circumstances will interfere. Some will be very attractive.(and have great tits) Some will have $ signs attached. There will be naysayers. But you have to come back to that place that only you have inside of you, that contains the reasons you want to do what you want to do. That is your starting point.

This May me and five other guys are hitting the TAT for 10 days.(me on my Dakar) I want to do the whole Hog, but the others cannot and don't know when they will be able; wives, businesses, etc. I'm single, no kids, no mort-gauge.

Next year I want to ride to Deadhorse. And I will do it. I will probably post a request for a riding partner for the TAT on here. As far as Deadhorse goes, I could leave July 1, 2013 and return Labor Day weekend, you in? What do you ride? If not Deadhorse, then the TAT. Leave July 1, 2013, return mid-August. Which do you like best?

Those are my two riding goals.


Meanwhile, I'm looking at parting w/my '00R1100S and maybe the FJR, which I love, for the Dakar version of the KTM 990. I would then own two Dakar bikes....cool. the F650 for the TAT and the KTM for Deadhorse.


Life is Short. There are No Do-Overs.
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