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Old 03-12-2012, 06:59 PM   #1
HighTechCoonass OP
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Laugh How to wire LED lights for low power / high power.

use a dimmer....................
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HighTechCoonass screwed with this post 03-25-2012 at 11:37 AM
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Old 03-14-2012, 05:50 PM   #2
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Are you sure this will work with all LEDs? The light output with LEDs is controlled by current, not voltage. If you get lucky the series resistance will lower the current and dim the lights but if it is low enough you would still get enough current through the lights to reach full power.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:35 AM   #3
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erm.. I thought that LED light output was controlled by duty cycle.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:41 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelJM1 View Post
erm.. I thought that LED light output was controlled by duty cycle.
It should, there are a few 555 based drivers you could use... Having them PWM controlled allows you to get more bright without the chances of ruining them... just my two cents.
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Old 03-15-2012, 06:57 PM   #5
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I just bought a set of Clearwater Lights "Glendas" that come with a dimmer. Set the dimmer anywhere between 0 - 100% output when your low-beams are on, flip to high beams and the Glendas automatically power up to 100%. Flip back to low-beam and the Glendas automatically dim to your setting. I have no idea what all the little gizmos and wiring tricks do, but maybe you could glean some ideas from their mounting and installation instructions on their website. The dimmer switch looks pretty low-tech.

Doug
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:40 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by HighTechCoonass View Post
LED are DC powered (HID are AC - via a dc to AC high voltage ballast).
If an LED light draws 1 amp that is 12 OHM resistance. 2 lights in series... 24 ohm. .5 amp total. fellow Advriders was asking about adding a dimmer for a low setting when they have there head lights in dim mode. Here is an option. You would need to check the lights wired in series to see if it is not to low.
You analysis only holds if an LED load is resistive and they are not. They are either a DC-DC converter which will try to maintain the brightness even if the input voltage varies (negative resistance), or for real cheap ones, just a few LEDs in series with a series resistor (very nonlinear resistance). Either way it will not work like simple series resistors. If you had a light that was a single LED with a large series resistor that dissipates about 75% of the power then putting two in series would work, but the brightness would be less than half as bright. LEDs drop about 3 volts so with one you would have about 9 volts across the dropping resistor. With 2 in series you would have about 3 volts across each dropping resistor, so you would have one third the current (brightness). Have you tried this series approach?
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:13 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by HighTechCoonass View Post
LED are DC powered (HID are AC - via a dc to AC high voltage ballast).
If an LED light draws 1 amp that is 12 OHM resistance. 2 lights in series... 24 ohm. .5 amp total. fellow Advriders was asking about adding a dimmer for a low setting when they have there head lights in dim mode. Here is an option. You would need to check the lights wired in series to see if it is not to low.

FAIL!


This is only close to correct for small little single tiny LEDs at low currents. Even then, you forgot to figure in the LED voltage drop, plus it would be silly to burn through 12 watts of power just to get a couple of watts at an LED, so few powerful LED designs do this. And if you did run into the case where you have say three LEDs in series with a resistor. Place that in series with three more, and suddenly the diode voltage drop of 6 LEDs is as high or higher then the battery and you get no light.

Large bright LEDs arrays use series/parallel combinations with switch mode power supplies. The LEDs get the same amount of power, weather you have 8 volts in or 24 volts in. Putting them in series means they either don't work at all, or the brightness remains the same.
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Old 03-16-2012, 03:24 PM   #8
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That is how I wire my grip heaters! Parallel = high power, series = low power.

If you want adjustability you could buy an LED dimmer off Ebay and put your switch across it to short it out for full brightness.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2209664051...84.m1439.l2649
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Old 03-16-2012, 05:44 PM   #9
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That is how I wire my grip heaters! Parallel = high power, series = low power.
That is also how my grips are wired. Works great for simple resistance loads. It gets too complicated to make a statement to everyone to do this.

Wire two house lights in series, they will be dim. Now wire two refrigerators in series and see if they are half as cold...

It gets complicated.
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Old 03-16-2012, 06:23 PM   #10
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PWM them, current mirror, or current setting resisitors will be needed.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:59 AM   #11
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wire two house lights in series, they will be dim. Now wire two refrigerators in series and see if they are half as cold...

It gets complicated.
lol
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:00 PM   #12
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That is also how my grips are wired. Works great for simple resistance loads. It gets too complicated to make a statement to everyone to do this.

Wire two house lights in series, they will be dim. Now wire two refrigerators in series and see if they are half as cold...

It gets complicated.
I thought refrigerators in series they got twice as cold
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Old 03-24-2012, 07:57 PM   #13
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Laugh

I tried this... the first refrigerator ran colder... the second was cold also... it seams the second fridge (wired in series of course) caused the AC frequency to go to 147 hz instead of 60hz(may be a phase harmonic induction of the B phase because of the laptop ac / dc power supply increasing the load on the netural leg), this caused the compressor to run twice as fast. I seams that since AC power and "A"ir "C"onditioner (cooling effects) has the same "nick name" to two get along real well and run faster.
I will try 3 is series tommorrow. I think I am on to something.... stay tuned....

Quote:
Originally Posted by worwig View Post
That is also how my grips are wired. Works great for simple resistance loads. It gets too complicated to make a statement to everyone to do this.

Wire two house lights in series, they will be dim. Now wire two refrigerators in series and see if they are half as cold...

It gets complicated.
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HighTechCoonass screwed with this post 03-25-2012 at 11:41 AM
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