ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > Parallel Universe
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-19-2012, 07:01 PM   #31
ThumperDR400
AudioDood
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: NW Montana
Oddometer: 15
Am I understanding correctly that a 3 1/100 (three one-hundredths) of a volt difference is causing enough imbalance in the battery for it to be considered a fail? That seems too small a difference for a failure.

Is the internal resistance combined with that voltage drop making the battery not deliver the goods under starting load?

Help me understand

Thanks

JJ
ThumperDR400 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2012, 07:53 PM   #32
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThumperDR400 View Post
Am I understanding correctly that a 3 1/100 (three one-hundredths) of a volt difference is causing enough imbalance in the battery for it to be considered a fail? That seems too small a difference for a failure.

Is the internal resistance combined with that voltage drop making the battery not deliver the goods under starting load?

Help me understand

Thanks

JJ
No, 3 1/100 of a volt (30mV) is the difference of resting voltage between individual cells in the battery that alerted me to the issue.

Take a look at this table. It is from Shorais own FAQ section. Actually the colored text is Shorais, the black text beside it are my own figures for per cell voltages. 4 LiFePo4 cells per 12 volt battery in series, so I took Shorais specs and divided by 4 to get per cell voltages. A 30mV difference between cells was indicating a 35% difference in how charged the cells were!

Shorai battery voltage

Lithium is a LOT different then lead/acid batteries!

After finding the voltage imbalance, I slowly drew current out of each cell singly through the BMS port and measured how much total amp hour each cell contained to confirm the issue, which it did.

I am not sure what caused the cell imbalance. It could have been that one part of the battery is running hotter due to it's placement in the bike. It could be that some cells were damaged by it's previous life in Lost Riders bike. Or, it could just be that the battery fell out of balance due to minute internal resistance and per cell self discharge rates.

It is impossible to make a battery built from multiple cells and have each cell be precisely the same. There is always going to be at least slight differences and thats just as true with lead acid batteries as LiFePo4 batteries as well as every other chemistry.


The real issue is with the charging voltage.

At 13.8 volts, my lead/acid Deka battery continued taking a 68mA charge even though it was already full. If there were any slightly imbalanced cells, that 68mA flowing through the battery would eventually equalize it. And since this would occur each and every time I rode my bike, the lead/acid battery would never get very out of balance before being equalized by that 68mA.

With the shorai battery, at 13.8 volts, as soon as one cell gets full, its resistance goes so high that for all purposes, zero mA continues to flow through the battery. so even the smallest differences in cells add up over time because the low F800 charging voltage won't continue to push any current through the battery once just one cell gets full.

It took Lost Rider 4 months to unbalance this Shorai 35%, But he is a talented guy :) (you know I love you Fin). For many that are being easier on the battery it probably won't occur for a lot longer.

With the exception of the BMW 800cc twins, every other modern BMW and every other brand I know of charges closer to 14.4 volts and at that voltage, current DOES continue to flow through the Shorai battery, so this is strictly a compatibility issue between current Shorai batteries and BMW 800cc bikes, or more specifically the voltage regulator on the BMW 800cc bikes which is set to so low of a voltage.

Make more sense?
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.

JoelWisman screwed with this post 03-19-2012 at 08:07 PM
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2012, 10:59 AM   #33
JRWooden
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: The great state of confusion
Oddometer: 4,118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelWisman View Post
... but honestly, the k7 platform is the only I can think of that charges at such low voltage so odds are every other regulator on the market will have a reasonable voltage setting that will operate fine with AGM and LiFePo4 batteries.

So, problem found, easily rectified, but something to think about if your wanting to or have already moved to LiFePo4 batteries.

This problem is ONLY going to occur on K7 bikes, AKA F650GS twin, F800GS,S,ST and R. This will NOT be an issue with any other current BMW bikes....
Might the (I hope) "soon to be announced" stator fix also address this issue?
JRWooden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2012, 02:18 PM   #34
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden View Post
Might the (I hope) "soon to be announced" stator fix also address this issue?
I don't know when or if BMW will address it. The issue is that the stator is simply engineered too hot. Glueing 4 thermocouples to the stator windings in the center.... 174c 181c, 184c, and 169c. (bottom, front, top, back).

Rearranging thermocouples the stator is hottest towards the inside of the engine where the highest winding temp was 193c.

Nothing short of super exotic insulation will ever hold up to these temps for long and thats why rewinds are not holding up.

The only cheap fix is to derate the stator, but raising the voltage regulation will help at least some, and possibly enough.

If derating is required, or one just wishes to go the cheaper route, inserting some resistance between the stator and shunt will be super cheap and easy.

Every other possibility that I and a couple of much smarter people can think of has been explored and ruled out. It is simply engineered too hot.
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2012, 02:39 PM   #35
JRWooden
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: The great state of confusion
Oddometer: 4,118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelWisman View Post
I don't know when or if BMW will address it. The issue is that the stator is simply engineered too hot. Glueing 4 thermocouples to the stator windings in the center.... 174c 181c, 184c, and 169c. (bottom, front, top, back).

Rearranging thermocouples the stator is hottest towards the inside of the engine where the highest winding temp was 193c.

Nothing short of super exotic insulation will ever hold up to these temps for long and thats why rewinds are not holding up.

The only cheap fix is to derate the stator, but raising the voltage regulation will help at least some, and possibly enough.

If derating is required, or one just wishes to go the cheaper route, inserting some resistance between the stator and shunt will be super cheap and easy.

Every other possibility that I and a couple of much smarter people can think of has been explored and ruled out. It is simply engineered too hot.
I was going to do the thermocouple thing .... glad you beat me to it ...

1) Do you think insulating the header would do much of anything,
or would that just be completely overwhelmed by the I^2 * R heating?

2) Series style regulator?

3) At the least maybe I'll find a replacement shunt style regulator that runs at 14.3V - 14.5V,
that would reduce the curent somewhat.....

Kind of a bummer that BMW/Rotax testing did not reveal this flaw


Thanks again Joel!
JRWooden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2012, 09:39 PM   #36
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden View Post
I was going to do the thermocouple thing .... glad you beat me to it ...

1) Do you think insulating the header would do much of anything,
or would that just be completely overwhelmed by the I^2 * R heating?

2) Series style regulator?

3) At the least maybe I'll find a replacement shunt style regulator that runs at 14.3V - 14.5V,
that would reduce the curent somewhat.....

Kind of a bummer that BMW/Rotax testing did not reveal this flaw


Thanks again Joel!
1) would have expected the highest temperature from the pole pieces closest to the header if it was a major influence, but it certainly can't hurt, the stator at least. Time will tell what the header and CAT think of it.

2) Unknown. It will reduce the heck out of stator temp anytime your battery and equipment are not pulling full load. Will it cause electrical interference with other items? Resonate or over voltage the stator insulation? Probably not, but I don't know for certain.

3) Yes! It's impossible for me to calculate. I lack the mathematics and even with them, things of this complexity require full scale testing to quantify. You have inductive reactance, capacitive reactance, eddy currents, magnetic saturation, and resistance, thermal conduction, convection, and radiation just to name the major players. My slightly educated guess is it might drop the stator temp 3c. That is something because the effect temperature has on magnet wire insulation is anything but linear.

What I really suspect is that a little resistance is going to have to be added to each of the 3 wires between the stator and voltage regulator. Once again complex, but a better educated guess is about 0.2 ohms, which should derate the stator output to around 370 watts by my calculations and assumptions.
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 08:12 AM   #37
Dieselboy
Journey not Destination
 
Dieselboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2003
Location: Port of the Gasparilla
Oddometer: 1,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelWisman View Post
....a little resistance is going to have to be added to each of the 3 wires between the stator and voltage regulator.... which should derate the stator output to around 370 watts by my calculations and assumptions.
Deal breaker.


Too little power available now.
__________________
Dieselboy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The Adventure Continues
Dieselboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 10:56 AM   #38
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dieselboy View Post
Deal breaker.


Too little power available now.
Well, the stators usually last between 30k and 50k miles without doing anything. One can just carry a spare or play the odds.

Also using a voltage regulator set for 14.2-14.4 will help both the battery and stator last longer.

A series regulator would probably increase stator life greatly. I just don't know if it would cause interference anywhere else.
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 11:06 AM   #39
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Alright, we know about the cell balance issue that has affected some people using the Shorai batteries.

We know we can get around that by upgrading to a 14.2 - 14.5 volt voltage regulator, which almost all other motorcycles come stock with.

We know we could also get around it by using a balance charger, like he one Shorai sells every month or two.

Next up, an explanation of terminology of batteries so we can discuss the merits and detractors of different battery chemistries.
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 02:05 PM   #40
NCD
Dirty Hairy
 
NCD's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: NE Ohio
Oddometer: 435
So, I rigged up my multimeter to the bike today to confirm or deny what my Battery Bug was telling me. I ran it through my Powerlet port that is straight to the battery via the same ring terminals the Bug uses.

Whether at idle, 2k, 3k, 4k - or whatever, my voltage is somewhere around this:



Now, my multimeter isn't some high dollar unit, but both the Bug and it read the same voltage, at the same time, on the same bike. When riding, the Bug toggles back and forth between 14.4 and 14.5 nearly all the time. The multimeter followed right along showing the float in smaller increments.

Did I get a top secret RR?
NCD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 02:13 PM   #41
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Amp hour (ah)

"Ampere hour", "Amp hour", or "AH" all mean the same thing, but what might that thing be?

Amp hour is a measure of charge. This doesn't have anything to do with charging a battery. The "charge" part means a given number of electrons. It's not an exact measure of energy, because that would require recording the voltage the amps were delivered at, which in a battery varies as the battery is depleted or as current demand is raised.

For our purposes, "amp hour" (AH) is a rough guide to how much capacity a battery has to support a load such as headlights or whatever until the battery is dead.

Batteries are chemical reactors, and the chemical reaction takes time, so an amp hour waiting is incomplete without knowing at what rate of discharge we are talking about, and what temperature for that matter.

For example, the most common oe battery in the F800GS is the YTX14 made by Excide. This battery specs out at 12AH @ the 10 hour rate. This means you can put a 1.2 amp load on this battery and it will support it for 10 hours before falling below a terminal voltage of 10.8 volts.

If you draw less current over more time, you will get slightly more AH out of the battery, perhaps 13AH if you draw it at the rate of 0.65 amps for 20 hours.

If you draw more current over a shorter time, 2 hours, you will only be able to draw perhaps 5 amp for 2 hours totaling 10 amp hour (5 amp X 20 hours = 10 amp hour)

The remaining amp hour did not go "POOF" and disappear. It was not "used up" by inefficiency. It is STILL THERE, however the chemical reaction in the battery was too slow to keep up and got TEMPORARILY exhausted.

Turn off the load (switch the key off), wait 15 minutes, turn the key back on, and the reaction will have caught up and you can draw out some more.

More over, this is not an entirely linear thing and varies not only from chemistry to chemistry, but brand to brand.

To determine exactly what a battery will do, you need a multi page white paper that is honest from the battery manufacture as temperature and rate of draw is going to have differing affects from various manufactures and even between models of battery from the same manufacture.

Here is a nice start from Odyssey Battery which in my experience is honest.

Scroll down to PC535 in the link and note the AH at differing rates. for instance at 1.3 amps, this battery will deliver for 10 hours totaling 13 amp hour. At a 112 amp rate this battery will only deliver for 2 minutes totaling 3.4 amp hour.

Now, 112 amps is pretty close to the average current the starter pulls on an F800GS, and if you hold the starter button for 2 minutes straight your starter motor will burn out and likely the wiring to it will catch on fire!

If you do this, please give me a call as I get good parts discounts and can make some money traveling to you to replace your starter and wiring while saving you money :) But I digress.....

Far more likely AMP HOUR is going to matter to you when using your bike headlight to set up your tent or when cranking repeatedly and leaving the key on because something is broken on your bike which you are trying to diagnose.

AMP HOUR, when shown on the battery or in specifications, is usually quoted at the 10 hour rate.

AMP HOUR is a rating of how likely you are to get a dead battery and need a jump, long hike or a tow.

AMP HOUR matters when you are knocked unconscious on a remote trail and wake to find that while your engine has shut down, your key is still on.

AMP HOUR matters a lot when your bike won't start and you are intermittently cranking and leaving the key on while using a multimeter to try and find the culprit, which is probably a stuck injector or pump if riding an F800 :)

AMP HOUR matters when your stator or voltage regulator fails 100 miles from civilization.

AMP HOUR goes down as the battery ages, very quickly with the crapy F800 oe battery. much slower with a DEKA battery, slower yet with an Odyssey battery, and in theory, very very slowly with a LiFePo4 battery that has not been abused.

AMP HOUR has NOTHING to do with how rapidly a battery will crank your engine over, though in extreme cases it does affect how many times you can crank your engine over before the battery is depleted or the chemistry is tired and you have to wait a while before trying it again.

AMP HOUR is relevant when you store your bike for extended periods without a battery maintainer hooked up, though it is only 1/3 of the equation.

AMP HOUR is not well understood, because in searching dozens of threads here, on GL16 forums, in the garage, and even in magazine forums, it has been miss applied and miss understood EVERY SINGLE TIME!


Enter Shorai and other LiFePo4 batteries. LiFePo4 chemistry behaves very differently. Every LiFePo4 battery I have seen will deliver about the same AH at the 10 hour rate as it will at the 1 hour rate. When does this matter? Never under normal circumstances, but some when you are cranking repeatedly trying to start an unhappy bike, and even more if your lights and heated gear are being left on. It also matters when your F800 is due for it's 30,000 mile stator replacement.

Because of the superior chemical reaction speed of LiFePo4 batteries over lead acid, Shorai sought to display AMP HOUR differently. Enter the term PBEQ. Shorai, as far as I can tell made up this term.

A Shorai LFX18 battery is spec'd at 18 AH PBEQ, but in truth is a 6 AMP HOUR battery. If you read shorais whole FAQ here, you will find the following sentences:

""he internal "completely discharged" capacity of a Shorai LFX is 1/3 the rated "PBeq" capacity. For example, the LFX18 12V series have 6Ah cells internally""

These two sentences are buried and have apparently been missed by nearly everyone because the number of places I have found where people are raving about having a higher AMP HOUR capacity compared to their stock battery is STAGGERING and is making my blood boil. I'm not angry at posters who are not electrical engineers. I am angry at Shorai for being deliberately deceptive IMO.

Likely some people caught this but accepted Shorais explanation in their FAQ under the heading "How does the LFX "PBeq AHr" capacity rating compare to lead-acid Ahr ratings?"

With absolutely ZERO fear of loosing a defamation law suit to Shorai, let me say that the majority of that FAQ is complete BULL SHIT.

Shorai boldly states that their 6 AMP HOUR LFX18 will perform like an 18 AMP HOUR lead acid battery. On some planet or powerful drugs such as LSD this may be true. Perhaps if you are comparing a $30 flooded lead acid battery and running current out of it at a 70 amp rate, this is true. But how on earth can you draw 70 amps continue sly with a motorcycle without setting it on fire? You won't be doing this with the starter, that much is for sure.

Bassed on what I am seeing, the Shorai LFX18 is comparable in amp hour to an AGM that has perhaps 8 amp hour.

In this video here:



leaving the key on continuously and cranking the Aprilia Caponord every 5 minutes, a $75 4 month old Deka ETX 14 battery rated 12 AMP HOUR drove the Shorai LFX18 rated 18 AH PBEQ into the ground and kept merrily starting the bike long after!

So, we are starting to see some posts of Shorai dissatisfaction and I have a dozen PM's of failures, so why do we have so many positive posts?

1) In blind product tests when consumers are tricked by sampling a product that is cheaper versus one that is more expensive, when in reality they are actually the exact same product, people nearly always rate the more expensive product much higher. We believe because we spent hard earned money and we want to believe.

2) AMP HOURS aren't usually important. They don't matter for race bikes at all and only affect adventurers or tourers in rare situations.

3) The Shorai FAQ is a convincing piece of propaganda even though it is mostly untrue.

4) People tend to be comparing a worn out OE battery to a brand new Shorai. The Shorai FAQ tends to be true when comparing even a new bike with an oe battery as BMW uses a fairly poor OE battery and then usually lets it sit uncharged for months in the warehouse as well as months uncharged on the dealership floor. Comparing the battery your BMW came with to the Shorai you are likely to like the Shorai a whole lot better. This does not hold true with a $75 DEKA ETX14 battery or a $120 Odyssey PC535 battery, or at least wouldn't if I sold you one of these batteries for $230 dollars :)

So, am I apposed to LiFePo4 batteries for adventuring and touring? Not at all, but you are going to need to get a MUCH bigger LiFePo4 battery then Shorai recommends.

I haven't had time to test Balistic or AntiGravity batteries yet, but from their web sites alone, I like AntiGravity better as they are being far more truthful about AMP HOUR specifications. Actually the entire FAQ of AntiGravity seems far more truthful then Shorais FAQ.

Time will tell once I can test one.

This is just AH comparisons so far. Much more to come, good and bad.

Next up, CCA

If you are truly interested in batteries understanding these terms is important so if anything is un-clear, ask and I will do my best to clarify :)
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 03:46 PM   #42
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCD View Post
So, I rigged up my multimeter to the bike today to confirm or deny what my Battery Bug was telling me. I ran it through my Powerlet port that is straight to the battery via the same ring terminals the Bug uses.

Whether at idle, 2k, 3k, 4k - or whatever, my voltage is somewhere around this:



Now, my multimeter isn't some high dollar unit, but both the Bug and it read the same voltage, at the same time, on the same bike. When riding, the Bug toggles back and forth between 14.4 and 14.5 nearly all the time. The multimeter followed right along showing the float in smaller increments.

Did I get a top secret RR?
You might have because this sure isn't what others are seeing.
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 08:48 PM   #43
Mike.C
Stelvio Dreamer!
 
Mike.C's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: Brisbane-Australia
Oddometer: 585
You're scaring me Joel!

I put Shorai's in both our F658's before shipping them to New Zealand for Christmas. So now the question is what regulator should I install as I really like the weight saving, and where to get it. Don't want to shove this excellent thread off topic so I think I'll post up a sep[arate one for that question.

Really appreciate your effort, really intersting even more important enlightening.
__________________
Cheers, Mike
Don't just look at it - Ride the bloody thing!
Mike.C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 09:02 PM   #44
ScienceOfDirt
U-Boat Rider
 
ScienceOfDirt's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Snowbelt/Rustbelt of Northeast Ohio
Oddometer: 1,691
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCD View Post
So, I rigged up my multimeter to the bike today to confirm or deny what my Battery Bug was telling me. I ran it through my Powerlet port that is straight to the battery via the same ring terminals the Bug uses.

Whether at idle, 2k, 3k, 4k - or whatever, my voltage is somewhere around this:



Now, my multimeter isn't some high dollar unit, but both the Bug and it read the same voltage, at the same time, on the same bike. When riding, the Bug toggles back and forth between 14.4 and 14.5 nearly all the time. The multimeter followed right along showing the float in smaller increments.

Did I get a top secret RR?
I've got a couple of mid grade Fluke meters. Next time you're going to be in my neighborhood, PM me, and we can hook them up to your bike and see. I'm going to put them on my 2010 just to get another data point.
__________________
Friend: That was some trail shortcut. Me: Yep. See how fast we got lost.
ScienceOfDirt is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2012, 09:09 PM   #45
JoelWisman OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JoelWisman's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: STL, MO, USA
Oddometer: 1,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScienceOfDirt View Post
I've got a couple of mid grade Fluke meters. Next time you're going to be in my neighborhood, PM me, and we can hook them up to your bike and see. I'm going to put them on my 2010 just to get another data point.
Please do, and that goes for anyone else concerned about this. It IS possible BMW changed the part, is testing alternates, or that I tested a fantastic run of bikes with regulators set defectively low.

Lets get some more data points, but please measure right at the battery terminals after the bike has been running for a while, and make note of ambient temperature.

What I am seeing with the two Shorai LFX18s I have experimented with is that 14 volts and below will eventually fall out of balance, though how long it will take I don't know. 14.1 volts is marginal. 14.2 volts and above looks like it will be ok to me.
__________________
Owned to date. Honda Aero 50, Honda Elite 80, Honda Elite 250x2, Suzuki Katana, Suzuki RF600, Yamaha YZF1000R, Kymco Xciting 500, Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Burgman 650, BMW F800GSx2, BMW S1000RR, Aprilia Scarabeo 200, Aprilia Caponord, Aprilia Sportcity 250
I love and miss you Jeneca and I'm sorry.
JoelWisman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 07:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014