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Old 05-07-2012, 01:51 PM   #16
lemieuxmc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMind View Post
This is a great course to run in a parking lot. You can set it up with one of those long hand-crank tape measures from the hardware store, plus low soccer cones (don't get the tall ones). It works well at half-size, but a very different experience.



You can get a set of cheap track timers on ebay for under $100: http://www.ebay.com/itm/bestlap-lap-...item3cb98e72eb

(You'll need that kit plus one more beacon, since you need 180 degree coverage to cover start and finish.)
Hell, I seen people doing this at closing time leavin the parking lot down at the bar!
They didn't need no cones or timers or nuthin!
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Old 05-07-2012, 04:57 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Snapper View Post
I love watching this stuff it's very cool and takes an amazing amount of bike control and skill to do well.

One thing that worries me is if it becomes too "second nature" - the skills used here are reasonably opposite of what you need at only slightly higher speeds on the road. Below about 15mph, you steer into a turn rather than countersteer, and you also counterweight (push the bike down) rather than hang-off on the inside.
Even below 15 mph, you're still using countersteering to initiate turns.
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Old 05-07-2012, 09:11 PM   #18
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It looks like fun on a closed course, but I don't know that I would try it on any parking lot. Too much sand, gravel, etc on the surface. Knobbies probably wouldn't help much either.
What about one in the dirt? Hmmm....
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Old 05-07-2012, 10:13 PM   #19
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The whole point of doing it (gymkhana!) in a parking lot is that you're dealing with real-world conditions. I can tell you that running a bike on shagged knobbies through a gymkhana course is the most entertaining thing ever. Yes, I lowsided once, but the speeds are so low that you can't get hurt.
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:05 AM   #20
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the lots are swept of course. any time you fall it is dangerous
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Old 05-08-2012, 06:19 AM   #21
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This looks excellent. I'd love to work on this skillset and it'd be fun while really learning the right riding. Of course, my Wee will be an extreme handful, but that's what I have right now. Makes a mini-motard like the WR250X look really attractive.

Update: I found the AMGRASS link. Doh!, Dredman posted this earlier but I missed it...
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:06 PM   #22
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Looks like a lot of fun. Seems like it might be hard to find a place that wouldn't run you off, but other than that should be great.
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:07 PM   #23
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So I dropped $10 today and bought some cones, then rode out to a parking lot and set up the coarse above. Riding laps on this coarse is indeed lots of fun, and a great workout. The cones are now residing in the tailbag on my Duc and I plan to work this into my routine rides. I have been meaning to put a smaller front sprocket on my Hypermotard and this definitely motivated me to get this done as its all low gear stuff. You definitely need to find a nice wide lot, I first tried to set up a coarse on a narrow lot and it wasn't nearly as much fun as you can't set up the longer lateral runs very well. If anybody knows some more good patterns, post them up. Great thread idea Vulfy. I'm going to try some coarses on dirt also.
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:21 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaddix View Post
any time you fall it is dangerous
not really.

i mean, sure, walking your dog--or anything--can be dangerous in one sense.

but dropping your bike or low siding at slow speeds isn't really very dangerous if you are wearing the right gear (knee guards, elbow guards, stiff boots, etc.)

dirt bike riders often do it numerous times per day without getting hurt.

i sometimes do it many numerous times a day without getting hurt.
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:25 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Snapper View Post
One thing that worries me is if it becomes too "second nature" - the skills used here are reasonably opposite of what you need at only slightly higher speeds on the road. Below about 15mph, you steer into a turn rather than countersteer, and you also counterweight (push the bike down) rather than hang-off on the inside.
personally, i find cornering that way is often advantageous in the city. i find that it keeps you higher up so you can see better. i also find it keeps your more balanced over the bike so you can react and flick it around quicker in the event of a sudden/unexpected change in riding environment. of course, it probably depends a lot on the particular bike you are riding.

also, as mentioned above, you countersteer at all speeds.
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Old 05-08-2012, 06:52 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by MotoMind View Post
The whole point of doing it (gymkhana!) in a parking lot is that you're dealing with real-world conditions. I can tell you that running a bike on shagged knobbies through a gymkhana course is the most entertaining thing ever. Yes, I lowsided once, but the speeds are so low that you can't get hurt.
I agree. Of course I'm not at the level of a top rider and I don't throw my bike around as much as they are, but I did have multiple instances of tire slippage due to debris, be that a bit of sand or a loose pebble, while leaning the bike.

I guess if you are ok with the idea of dropping your bike (and they do drop their bikes during practices ) and have decent crash protection on the bike as well as your own gear (notice they all have crash bars installed, even on the sports bikes), then it really is a good experience either way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zum7U...ure=plpp_video


The first few times my tire slipped at an angle, my heart went to my feet. I didn't lay my bike down, but it got upset from my shaky throttle hand. After the first initial scare, you start to learn what your bike can and can not handle. I know that I can lean the bike pretty far and even if it hiccups on the sand, as long as I keep my throttle steady it pulls through. Of course I'm not talking about riding yards and yards in sand, while dragging my knee. A small patch is what I usually encounter. But that feeling of bike slipping away for a fraction of a second is a good learning experience, so you are not taken by surprise if something similar happens on the road.

I'm just saying that a general feel for what happens when you encounter sand, is a good learning experience, so that you are not panicking, like you would the first time. Also keep in mind that this is coming from a rider who hasn't been on any dirt bike or off-road, ever. So this was a new experience for me.

Please don't take what I'm saying above as a reckless advice, everything and everybody has their limits. Also a good judgement is important on your part. I started with slow exercises on my old 250. Slow u-turns, slow 8's, basically everything we are suppose to learn and know after MSF. So this sport is a progression from SAFE and responsible riding. It is based on the skills that we as riders need to know, just taken to another level. Actually running 8's is another branch of Gymkhana. Riding a set number of 8's and beating your time is something they do as well. I love riding them, and when you get into the rhythm and into the zone it can be an almost meditative experience.
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:09 PM   #27
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Excellent! I have started doing an ad hoc version of gymkhana on my TDM. It stemmed from teaching my gf low speed skills on her DT & I enjoyed that so much I had a crack at it on Tubby. I do need to get some engine bars, though, had a couple of heart in mouth moments.
I set up our course with half tennis balls, easy to ride over & I put in a stop box to practice our braking in a turn.
I've gone from crapping myself doing a u-turn in 8 mtrs of road to doing 360's in less than 5 mtrs & figure eights from full lock to lock. The training has made me a lot more mobile & confident on the bike. It also really emphasizes that you go were you look even if it's over your shoulder.

Gymkhana has just started to happen down here in NZ so hopefully I may be able to enter an event in the future.
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Old 05-09-2012, 05:16 AM   #28
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MotoGynkhana

I have contacted the International as well as the US National Associations. I intend to start this up here where I live and see if we can get something going. The MSF uses a lot near my home for their training and I'll be contacting them to see if we could use the same lot. It's huge with lots of space for multiple courses, even while the MSF is running their classes or the State Police are using their skid pad and training area. I feeling pretty pumped because this looks like so much fun.

Update: I have started a blog for organizing this in Kentucky. The blog address is http://www.kymotogymkhana.blogspot.com and I hope to recieve information from the National as well as the International Associations very soon. I'm issuing an invitation to all Kentucky riders to join in organizing this group. Also working out the kinks in a specifc forum, outside ADV Rider, for maintaining event information.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:49 AM   #29
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Relevant:
Moto Gymkhana? http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=686638
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Old 05-12-2012, 09:14 PM   #30
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Christened my new R&G frame sliders as well as my suit today with a small drop. Chopped throttle at the tightest bend, and bike went down, tumbled off it onto my knee, elbow and then back. Speed was well bellow 10mph, so bike didn't even slide, just dropped.

One thing for those who want to do this sport, is to definitely be ATGATT about it. Good knee pads, hip pads, tail bone, and all upper, chest, back, elbows, shoulder and good gloves with good padding on the fingers.
Good boots too, no sneakers, or even work boots. A good chance of trapping your foot under the bike, since the speeds are pretty low and you are not sliding away from the bike.

Public parking lot is becoming an issue. First of all I wouldn't want to take any tumbles in front of the public (this one happened in early, early morning, so it was completely empty), as it would create an unsafe environment for people around me and just makes me look reckless, which produces complaints and a patrol car.

Second, as my skills are slowly increase, so is the size of the course. The best parking lot so far, with a decent pavement produces a roughly 80x80 foot square for my course. Right now its pretty good for what I can do, but I can see that it will become too small in a few months of constant practice.

Have to start looking for a private or an abandoned lot in my area.

Overall, had pretty good morning of practice, even with the tumble. Refined my previous course to a simplified one, which is a bit shorter, but gives me a chance to run it constantly, one lap after another.

Here is the diagram for anybody who is interested. It will look messy at first, but just follow the numbers and it will make sense. It gives me a few good speed bends, and then a tight more technical bit. Good practice for hard braking in the very first straight as well as the last to the finish. This is roughly 80 x 80 feet. First and last cone at 1 and 14 can be used as turn-around to start next lap immediately, so its a continuous course.

gymkhanaCourse

On the other hand a simple practice of running 8's can still be done on a small parking lot, and even without cones. Good braking, and lock to lock turning is essential, and 8's give you a chance to practice all of that.

PS: MotoMind, tried setting up your course, but ran out of room. Tried setting it up smaller, but due to some potholes and bad pavement couldn't get it to work fully on the lot I usually practice on, especially with the faster bends in it. Gotta find more space.
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