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Old 06-08-2012, 08:37 AM   #29011
Krabill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by what broke now

This may not suit you, but for about $230 you can online a pump from Sports plaza in Oregon and change it yourself in under 2 hours. No more guessing or spending time trying to get disinterested people to see things your way.
$213 At Service Honda
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Old 06-08-2012, 11:10 AM   #29012
Jungle Man
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When I held my bike in a high rpm range going up an asphalt hill, it would sputter when it was really wound out. Is this normal, like a rev limiter or something?
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Old 06-08-2012, 11:51 AM   #29013
Olmer
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At last, some photos of the "Raid de l'amitié", last month in Marocco:















Olivier.
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Old 06-08-2012, 11:53 AM   #29014
bigdon
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Great pictures!
Is that a one off fairing?
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Old 06-08-2012, 12:09 PM   #29015
Subaru297
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Originally Posted by TwilightZone View Post
>

I had a new chain and wore mine out. I think probably from the extra luggage carried on the back of the bike in Baja. The luggage made the bike ride too low and the chain slider was gone in very short order.

I added a 14 tooth sprocket, replaced the chain slider, bumped up tension on the rear shock spring... and didn't replace the chain. Now it appears to be fine, there is really no chain slider wear in 1500 miles.

Thats not to say that a bad chain won't wear it out, probably anything that causes the chain to occupy the swingarm area is bad. So set your ride height, 14 tooth sprocket... and lube the chain often. (Need to change rear spkt to 47-50 tooth.)
Absolutely correct! I have been reading through this thread and every time this comes up I want to comment but I am still pretty far back in the thread.
I don't think this issue is related to loose or worn out chains. It is most likely from not setting sag properly. In most cases this happens to people out on a trip with lots of luggage (overloaded) and or riding offroad lots and fully compressing suspension often.
I have a WRX that sees 95%+ on road duty and I ran my old worn out and kinked chain very loose for a few thousand kms before I finally ordered a new one. My bike has 12000kms on it now and my slider looks to be about 50% worn. The chain that just came off had lots of tight links (kinks) and was run fairly loose for a while. No disappearing slider!

More people also need to adjust their chains properly. I think the Yamaha method if done wrong will leave your chain too tight as well as using the two finger method. The easiest way to do it is to remove one bolt from the bottom of your shock (very easy and quick!) and adjust your chain and then run the back tire through its range of travel. You will be able to feel when the chain is at its tightest point. Adjust it a tiny bit loose at that point and you will have a perfectly adjusted chain.
No measuring, no guessing, no fingers or rules of thumb!
No tight chains that will wear out countershaft seals and bearings or wheel bearings wearing out early either. It is also way easier than measuring chain tension.

Cheers
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Old 06-08-2012, 12:37 PM   #29016
Dirtnadvil
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WTT wolfman bags and rack for Giant Loop Coyote bag

I am looking for someone who would like to trade your used but loved GL Coyote bag for a complete rack and bag set up for the WR250r/x.
I have the rack that Wolfman sells with a top rack from Turbo City. The bags I have are the non waterproof Wolfman saddle bags. This gear has been used on a few tours so there are scratches but nothing is bent , missing or torn. All hardware is present. I will also leave the aluminum mounting plate on the left side rack that I mounted a Kolpin water and fuel packs on ( mission specific). I will me taking the fuel can mount with me. This is a good set up if you are bringing a bunch of stuff for an extended ride. It carries a weeks worth of gear and food. All of this cost me over 500 bucks. I am just wanting to try something new.......contact me at;
surfdogs_attic@yahoo.com
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Old 06-08-2012, 01:41 PM   #29017
duanew1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WW Ronin View Post
So I noticed on a ride today that when I killed the engine on a steeper section of trail, I had a hell of a time getting it to restart. Backed it down to flatter ground and the problem seemed to go away. Stock fuel tank about 3/4 full. Happened a couple times under similar circumstances. Has anyone else noted this? Behaved like it wasn't getting fuel. Plenty of electric power just would turn over.

I have had a similar problem on my 2008. When I kill it off-roading I have to wait for the fuel pump to fully reprime in order for the bike to start. Otherwise it will spin and not catch. It has not left me stranded yet or really had any other problems. The pump is not super strong sounding so expect that I might have a problem any day now.
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Old 06-08-2012, 01:53 PM   #29018
Subaru297
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jungle Man View Post
When I held my bike in a high rpm range going up an asphalt hill, it would sputter when it was really wound out. Is this normal, like a rev limiter or something?
Yes. That is probably the rev limiter you are hitting. It will cut the spark around 11k rpm (I think) and the bike will sputter and stumble.

Nothing to worry about.

Cheers
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Old 06-08-2012, 02:04 PM   #29019
Olmer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdon View Post
Great pictures!
Is that a one off fairing?
It's a fairing from a BMW 650 Dakar (from 2003, i think), bolted on a enduro mask. Cheap and easy !
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Old 06-08-2012, 02:05 PM   #29020
bigdon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olmer View Post
It's a fairing from a BMW 650 Dakar (from 2003, i think), bolted on a enduro mask. Cheap and easy !
OK thanks!
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Old 06-08-2012, 02:24 PM   #29021
Pantah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Subaru297 View Post
More people also need to adjust their chains properly. The easiest way to do it is to remove one bolt from the bottom of your shock (very easy and quick!) and adjust your chain and then run the back tire through its range of travel. You will be able to feel when the chain is at its tightest point. Adjust it a tiny bit loose at that point and you will have a perfectly adjusted chain.
No measuring, no guessing, no fingers or rules of thumb!
No tight chains that will wear out countershaft seals and bearings or wheel bearings wearing out early either. It is also way easier than measuring chain tension.

Cheers
That method will surely produce a perfect chain tension. I'll try that.
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Old 06-08-2012, 03:59 PM   #29022
Jungle Man
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"It's the rev limiter"
Thanks Subaru!
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Old 06-08-2012, 04:10 PM   #29023
Attrition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Subaru297 View Post

More people also need to adjust their chains properly. I think the Yamaha method if done wrong will leave your chain too tight as well as using the two finger method. The easiest way to do it is to remove one bolt from the bottom of your shock (very easy and quick!) and adjust your chain and then run the back tire through its range of travel. You will be able to feel when the chain is at its tightest point. Adjust it a tiny bit loose at that point and you will have a perfectly adjusted chain.
No measuring, no guessing, no fingers or rules of thumb!
No tight chains that will wear out countershaft seals and bearings or wheel bearings wearing out early either. It is also way easier than measuring chain tension.

Cheers


I have done this and it is easy to see where it will wear on the guard at it's tightest point




Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrition View Post
I noticed the links on my new chain were getting polished from rubbing. I checked the tension and I had ~1/2" between the chain and swing arm when on the side stand.

I disconnected the swing arm to move it to the tightest point and this is what I found.



The chain rubs on the guard at the bottom of the swing arm. I adjusted the chain to 20mm slack at the tightest, which was not a huge increase, although the chain was on the tight side and now it is just barely touching the guard.

It looks like it will eventually chew through the master link....

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Old 06-08-2012, 07:14 PM   #29024
Mr. Fisherman
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So my smart friend Luke came by to help me change my chain and sprockets.
I owe Bigdog a big thank you! 14 50 gearing is the shizzle! Shifting into 6th at 75 indicated and 6th gear pulls hard... me likey!
Check out the difference on the rear...



I had feared that my chain may have gotten into my swingarm and those fears were confirmed. I had planned ahead and bought one from a guy that was parting his bike out. Good thing...


Then Luke, the smart one... discovered that the factory spoke wrench was am amazing tool.
According to the TSB M2008-20 the chain slack should be 165 MM back from the front chain tensioner with 36 lbs of upward force on the chain and the slack between the chain and the swingarm should be between 8 and 13 mm. Well guess what... that magic spoke wrench at the narrow part is just about 11MM and at the wide part it is 16.09mm so if the narrow part of the tool doesn't touch and the widest part just does, you are good.



I always have this tool with me so these checks will be quick and repeatable from now on. Oh, and 165mm back from the front chain tensioner is just about inline with the mud flap as mentioned earlier.



Easy Peasy, repeatable and consistent. It takes the mystery out of this adjustment for me. Luke also showed me how to use a straight edge against the sprocket to align the chain. This was simple and I wasn't surprised to see a slight difference between my adjuster markings from side to side when we were done.

Thanks Luke for the help and the tutorial and Thanks Bigdog for the advice on the 14 50 gearing. I am stoked to get on my next adventure

The TSB says to do this with the bike on the side stand. I did mine with the rear tire in the air.
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Old 06-08-2012, 07:27 PM   #29025
amtz.zero
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Originally Posted by jeickerman View Post
The wr has a white rear fender now.
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