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Old 07-06-2012, 04:20 PM   #1
Discojon75 OP
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Location: Alamogordo, NM
Oddometer: 241
Old and salvage scooters...

Anyone ever repair one? What did you have to do to get it into road worthy condition? Was it worth the cost?

Like most people on here who have CT90s, I found one for $450 in non-running condition. New battery, cleaned fuel tank, cleaned carb... first kick. I did later put a new exhaust on it as the old one had some rust... but the original tires still hold air! At least, they're the tires that were on it when the bike was last used in 1998. I probably have $700 total into the bike. It does leak oil just a little from somewhere.
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2002 BMW K1200LT// 2008 KLR 650 // 1975 Honda CT90 // 2008 WR250X // BMW R100GS with sidecar // 1998 Harley-Davidson Sportster 1200// 2009 Kawasaki Versys // 2006 Yamaha Majesty
" The BEST bike......is a garage full of them."--dlearl476
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Old 07-06-2012, 05:59 PM   #2
Wentwest
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I do this quite a lot. It can be fun, figuring out what's screwed up, what's still good. Mostly you will be cleaning everything, especially the fuel system. The vacuum and fuel lines are often shot, hardened and leaky from age. Depending on the storage, the electrical components can be a problem, but my experience with Hondas is pretty good. Lots of parts on Ebay. You'll need a good hardware store for replacement bolts and nuts. The parts diagrams on www.bikebandit.com show the metric sizes.

The tires are always bad. Even if they look good and hold air, they are brittle and hard and they won't grip in a sharp turn or a strong stop, and you'll be injured or worse. Just replace them, and the tubes or valves.

Grease and oil everything that moves; change the oil right away and again after you've ridden maybe 100 miles.

You'll never make any real money doing this, but it is fun.

Bob
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:26 PM   #3
Forde
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meh, as long as your not losing money.

well ok, even if your losing money its still fun and worth it :p
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:00 AM   #4
Dabears
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My rule with old cars, motorcycles and scooters is only to start with something that you actually will want when it's finished. I made the mistake several times of dragging home projects that I sank lots of money into but when finished they weren't really something I wanted.

Let's face it- as cheap as scooters can be had in good shape used, this is really a hobby, unless you are going to focus on rare or valuable brands and specific models that you can accumulate spares and specific tools to redo more than one. I built a Triumph Daytona back in the 70s that I got as a completely disasembled basket case for $100. I put several hundred in for clutch, battery, and paint supplies, but had a decent bike that I later sold for a small profit.

My current scooter is a 1980 P200e, the unloved tractor of the older vespas. They are easy to work on, parts are available, and they were kind of the peak of the vespa technology before they went 4 stroke and jumped into the modern age. I highly recommend them for projects, because they really hold their value. (very similar to Honda CT90s). Only thing I would stay away from are really obscure models where parts are a problem. Nothing sucks worse that parking a project due to not being able to source a critical part when no replacements are available...

In the 3 years I've had the Vespa it's never quit running or broken down. All repairs/upgrades were things I could order while still keeping it on the road while parts arrived. Some day I'll dismantle it completely and paint it, but I use it, so I don't want to take it off the road.....that's the kind of project I like.....
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Old 07-08-2012, 03:40 PM   #5
351 power
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good topic. i got my eye out for a project scooter but have also been thinking it should be something i want to ride after
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Old 07-09-2012, 12:33 AM   #6
fullmetalscooter
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Will ct 90 and the CT 110 are worth between 900 to 2 grand . With parts still being made there don't lack support. I think the website for them is doc atv ?? Anyway he has any part you could ever want for any of these honda from the 50cc to the ct110 which are sold down under still to the post office. If you want to hold on a to a scooter for years go for spend the cash. Just don't be like one guys on cragslist where I live whom spend 4 to 6 grand on a custom ruckus. No ones going to pay the cash. I feel most scooters that end up sitting in a garage can be made to run again. Most scooter end up not even having the engine broken in when it comes to miles. So I guess the question is how many hours to bring it back from the dead? Is you time worth it? Will you find it fun or a be one of the people whom leaves it in a pile of parts. Can you plan what your doing? Take pictures and bags every bolt etc so you know what the hell it is and where it's from? I ve walked away from scooter that are rare or just hard to find parts from because your screw. Eg a truimph 200 cc . Great scooter. 70 MPG and a top speed of 70 MPH. Yet no dam parts. You can make your own clutch plates for them ( Use wine corks in place of the original cork ) but no brake drums etc. If you find parts you ll pay through the nose for shipping them from Europe. IF if so rare as to worth mega bucks then go for it but never spend more then 50% of what you can sell it for. Will thats my 2 cents worth. Soon to be 5 cents worth because canada is doing away with the penny.
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Old 07-09-2012, 11:10 AM   #7
Bronco638
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Lots of good thoughts here.

One thing I would not want to mess with is a scoot that has frame or unibody damage. Everything else is easy to fix/replace but I wouldn't mess with that.
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