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Old 07-16-2012, 06:32 AM   #211
jay547
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The Council Oak Tree, Tulsa, OK.



The Creek Council Tree, a mature burr oak, marks the traditional "busk ground" chosen in 1836 by the Lochapoka clan of Creek Indians. In late 1834, they had begun their involuntary migration from Alabama under the control of the U.S. Government. It was a slow and painful trek; of the original group of 630, 161 died in route. Their 1836 arrival was marked with a solemn and traditional ceremony. A "busk" site was chosen on a low hill overlooking the Arkansas River. Here, according to their traditions, they deposited ashes brought over the trail from their last fires in Alabama. The Tulsa-Lochapoka, a political division of the Creek Nation, established their "town." As late as 1896, the Lochapoka gathered here for ceremonies, feasts, and games. The site was probably not used by the Indians after the turn of the century. Gradually it became a solid residential area for the growing city of Tulsa. The Creek Council Tree itself, however, survived. The oak, standing in its small, well-landscaped city park, serves as a meaningful memorial to the proud Indian tribe that brought law and order to a new homeland nearly 156 years ago. The Creek Council Tree was placed under Historic Preservation Zoning in January of 1992.
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Old 07-17-2012, 04:12 PM   #212
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Smoky Valley Roller Mill. Lindsborg Kansas.
































Sod Buster screwed with this post 07-17-2012 at 04:19 PM
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Old 07-17-2012, 05:34 PM   #213
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[QUOTE=jay547;19139643]The Council Oak Tree, Tulsa, OK.




What tree?

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Old 07-17-2012, 09:07 PM   #214
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The historic train roundhouse at Como, in South Park, Colorado.





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Old 07-18-2012, 05:25 PM   #215
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Mr Meriwether Lewis was a smart dude!



Standing on the Continental Divide in 1805 Meriwether Lewis wrote in his journal that the Columbia River and all the other rivers they were facing would have much stronger currents (Rapids) than any rivers they had encountered on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers.

How he figured it out. A British sea captain (Capt Gray) had documented the latitude and longitude of the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington state in 1792, 13 years earlier.

Knowing their current latit/longit. standing on the Cont. Divide Lewis in his head calculated the distance from where he stood to the mouth of the Columbia River (about 600 miles) and sea level and had a mental picture of the difficulties the Expedition faced.

He documented these thoughts on August 10, 1805. Months before they reached the Pacific Ocean. Lewis' conclusion was that the current elevation and distance to the Pacific and it's elevation meant that the rapid water fall would not be navigable by boat and man.

Lewis' comment to Clark was basically "we need more horses".

Amazing foresight!

Approaching the Cont Divide via Lemhi Pass Road:



Standing on top of Lemhi Pass looking east from the Continental Divide.



Standing on the Cont Divide on Lemhi Pass, looking towards today's mouth of the Columbia River (Astoria, Oregon/Cape Disappointment) - (605 miles over that horizon).



Marker at the Cont Divide about Meriwether Lewis' conclusions. Note to far right that the actual distance was 600 miles.



Meriwether Lewis was a really smart dude.

With a compass, sun, moon, stars, and a quill pen his conclusions were exactly correct.
Most of us would have never figured this out even with our Garmins.

Got lost going to the grocery store today.
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Old 07-19-2012, 04:19 PM   #216
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Greasy Grass

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Old 07-20-2012, 04:29 PM   #217
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Old 07-20-2012, 10:23 PM   #218
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Thumb Thank You to those that post such excellent material.

Very Powerful stuff. I usually just lurk and don't post, not wanting to break the integrity of the threads.

But, I LOVE your posts here, in The Plains and Before and After, along with those of others who contribute.

Please keep up the fine work!

I am amazed that the soldier documentation was as good as it was, in regards to cause / date of death and location.

So, I am completely baffled as to how the (very appropriate) Indian Defender grave markers were located on the spot where they fell, the name and tribe info retained, etc.

Any insight to the abilty to do that?
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Old 07-20-2012, 11:59 PM   #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brakelate View Post

I am amazed that the soldier documentation was as good as it was, in regards to cause / date of death and location.

So, I am completely baffled as to how the (very appropriate) Indian Defender grave markers were located on the spot where they fell, the name and tribe info retained, etc.

Any insight to the abilty to do that?
After the battle some of these sites had rock cairns placed on them by the familys of the fallen, before the village split up.

link to how they know.

http://www.littlebighorn.info/Articl...Casualties.pdf
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Old 07-21-2012, 07:26 AM   #220
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sod Buster View Post
After the battle some of these sites had rock cairns placed on them by the familys of the fallen, before the village split up.
It's a wonderful development to see that in my lifetime both sides of these conflicts are beginning to receive attention.
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:02 AM   #221
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The Arikara and the Crow Scouts of the 7th, some were turned back by Custer on the morning the village was found as the scouts were sure of the disaster to come. They would have rode into the battle but not before preparing to die which was not good for the moral of the soldiers, the first three names on the memorial for the Arikara did fight and die here. In the above old photo the indians on the horses are three of Custers scouts, the photo was taken in 1908, their names are Whiteman Runs Him, Hairy Mocasin, and Goes Ahead.





In April 1876 the small Crow tribe was living under army control at the Crow Agency in Montana. The Sioux and Cheyenne were traditional enemies of the Crow so at the beginning of the Great Sioux War, several Crow warriors enlisted to guide Custer's expedition to the Little Big Horn River. Six Crow scouts and thirty-nine Arikara scouts witnessed the Battle of the Little Big Horn, from June 25 to 26.


This is looking down the ravine that Reno retreated up after charging into the south end of the village below on the other side of the tree line. Custers favorite Scout Bloody Knife, marker in the middle and second name on the memorial wall was killed in the tree line below during Renos retreat to high ground above the river.





Four of the scouts, Curly, Goes Ahead, Hairy Moccasin and White Man Runs Him rode with Custer's column while two others, Half Yellow Face and White Swan rode with Major Markus Reno. Custer's scouts were relieved just before the beginning of the main battle because they changed out of their blue uniforms and put on their tribal wear. The scouts angered Custer and said they wanted to die like warriors, not as soldiers. Seventeen year old Curly refused to leave though but through the insistence of Mitch Bouyer, a mixed-blood French and Lakota guide, the young man was convinced to depart with the other three scouts. Curly watched the fight through a spy glass, from the top of a ridge, about a mile and a half away from the battlefield. When the fighting was over he eluded Sioux horsemen for two days until finally reaching the steamboat Far West at the confluence of the Little Bighorn and Bighorn Rivers. Using sign language, Curly was able to communicate the first report of Custer's defeat.

Bloody Knife, Custer and Captain William Ludlow.




After being relieved, White Man Runs Him, Goes Ahead, Hair Moccasin and the Arikara scout Strike the Bear joined up with Reno's column and the other two scouts. They were briefly engaged in battle from the top of a ridge, repulsing a Sioux charge. All of them survived and retreated with Major Reno, except White Man Runs Him who continued fighting under Colonel John Gibbon who rescued Reno's men on June 26.


From left to right, White Man Runs Him, Hairy Moccasin, Curly, Goes Ahead.
Custers Crow Scouts. 1913



Curly 1876


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Old 07-21-2012, 08:15 PM   #222
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A lot of these guys were fresh off the boat.







These single head stones give one pause for thought, desperate, seperated, alone.






























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Old 07-21-2012, 09:07 PM   #223
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More good stuff sb. Looks like a warm and balmy day there, enjoy a picnic, read a book in the fields.

Here's a sign at Dinosaur National Monument in extreme NW Colorado. It describes the great Echo Park ride way down below which can be access just south of this sign. See 2nd pic.



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Old 07-22-2012, 05:34 PM   #224
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The "Last Battle"

of the so called Indian Wars.
Battle of Milk Creek, South of Craig Colorado and North of Meeker, lead to the White River Ute Tribe being moved to Utah
The markers, the one on the left lists the killed and wounded soldiers, it used to be shorter. It was raised to be the same height at the one on the right, rumor has it it is 1" taller.The middle one was "snuck" in sometime in the 80's as rumor has it by the Ute Tribe , the one on the right is the official Ute one (1993).


The right


the middle


the left
Killed

wounded panel 1

Panel 2

11 Medals of Honor were earned on the battle field. Among the Buffalo Soldiers was Sgt. Johnson
here is the citation
Citation:
Voluntarily left fortified shelter and under heavy fire at close range made the rounds of the pits to instruct the guards, fought his way to the creek and back to bring water to the wounded.
first black man to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The 12 non-commishion officers, enlisted and teamsters are buried in a mass shallow, unmarked grave to the right of the point above the creek in this photo. From what I have read, this is the only place the US Army has not removed known US soldiers from a battle field and given them a militarty burial. The grave was uncovered in 2006 so it exact position is known and marked.

The Park the Meeker Colorado Historcal Society is building.
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Old 07-22-2012, 08:06 PM   #225
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Battle of Milk Creek site added to my bucket list

followed part of the Pony Express Trail a few yrs ago and went right by Milk Creek and did not even know it. A spur of the Pony Express traveled thru Craig, Colorado.

An interesting map: How the pioneers, troops, trading posts, etc and Pony Express traveled east to west.

http://cprr.org/Museum/Maps/Pony_Express.html
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