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Old 08-23-2012, 03:19 AM   #31
L0cky
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Location: Thurgoona, NSW
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I'm 32, married and have 2 children

In May 2008 I went down, and broke both arms.....(3yo & 9mth old)

In May 2012 I went down and broke my right ankle - with surgery (7yo & 4yo)

This is in the dirt, I ride hard..

I've sold the bike, I am mostly recovered now...

With work, and wife, and kids and mortgage I've realized that I don't mind the risk of hurting myself (it comes with the territory I guess) - but I ain't going to put up with the recovery again.

I nearly lost my job, had expensive hospital bills to pay, was in the doghouse with the missus, and my little 7yo girl cried when she visited me in hospital with the ankle. 7yo, big blue eyes, and sadness that cannot be described..

That was enough for me. Each man will make his own decision for his own reasons.

I've taken up road & mountain bike cycling. Yeah you can hurt yourself..but you're going slower...downhill single track, on a high quality 29er gives me the rush/thrill/adrenaline that I need, whilst also providing the 'alone time' that a family man needs - plus I'm as fit as I've been since I was 16.

Don't get me wrong - I love motorbikes - but in the weigh up there can only be one winner, depending on your responsibilities and circumstances.
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:39 AM   #32
Dragonflylily
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"To me riding any motorcycle is a passionate and visceral experience." Like that.

I too would have experienced the heebeegebbies had my daughter said something like that before a ride. My husband is not a rider so he'd be in heaven if I gave it up today.

Your child's dream was playing with your emotions & your mental state which removes you from full road concentration. Six children, that's a ton of responsibility.

Go with your heart, that will lead you in the right direction. Being a woman I could not imagine telling my husband to stop riding but faced with the possibility of raising six children on my own would be difficult even if financial issues were in order.

You seem like a darn lucky fella'. A good wife who remains home while you ride all over & six healthy children. You'll know the right answer.
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:45 AM   #33
kabagram
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I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit this, but I was "spooked" a few times in the last month prior to purchasing a 2011 KTM 990. I agonized over the decision to buy a bigger bike for months, but in the 2 or 3 weeks prior to purchase, I had several things that gave me pause for thought aside from all the motorcycle accidents I see on the news

I sold a nice boat that hadn't been getting used figuring the funds would make purchasing a more expensive bike an easier decision. The buyer tells me his brother was killed on a motorcycle.

I ride to a local mexican hole in the wall for a burrito. An EMT walks in, orders, then asks me if that's my bike. He says it's good to see that I'm wearing all the gear because he had to give up riding after pulling too many body parts off the road in bike accidents.

I'm making a 4 hour drive between St Louis and Louisville completely consumed in thought when arrive at the question "Is the risk I'm wanting to take fair to my wife and two grade school daughters who depend on me?" Then I see a few cars pulled over on the side of the interstate. I see emergency vehicles far in the distance in front and behind me. I look over to see a man putting a towel over the badly mutilated body sitting inside a vehicle that apparently departed the shoulder and flipped. I wonder about his/her family.

I'm working on restoring a 1952 John Deere model B tractor last week. I pause and sit down on a bucket, again agonizing over the deposit I just put on a bike a day earlier. Something smacks me hard square in the forehead. I'm stunned for a second, look down between my feet, and see a huge bumble bee crawl in a circle, roll over and die.

So I chalk it all up to me trying to find meaning in events that have none, buy the bike, and have been enjoying it.

But part of me still wonders.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:12 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tall big 68 View Post
As with others, a little voice (one of many I hear) was louder than the others, Stop, if you wish to stay alive.
Round that time (2005) was experiencing medical maladies, first a diagnosis of Sjogren's Syndrome, a form of Lupus. During further investigation an enlarged left kidney, a diseased spleen and other complications. That was the spring of 2006. Needle biopsies revealed a rather massive amount of cancer in my system. Figured OK, surgery when?
Late November 2006 was the time. Mum's 90th birthday was earlier in the month and I wanted to be around for that. Tried to ride every day until the date of surgery. My 1981 Goldwing was well and truly abused. I become weaker over time. The surgery was the third week of November being on the table about eight hours or more. There were complications aside from the operating table being a wee bit too small for my 6'8" length and my 39 inch arms. Nothing fits, even now!
Out came the left kidney, the spleen, a bit of my bladder and all the lymph nodes in my chest and under my arms and my groin. All riddled with cancer. I was quite weak afterwards, yet was discharged two days later as I was responding well.. Christmas was very quiet, and first week into the new year started chemo for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. What they don't tell you is the extreme tiredness and the weakness with chemo. Six rounds two weeks apart and two more doses two months apart. Tried to straddle the bike. I couldn't lift my legs let alone mount the beast. Figured I'd wait. The time never arrived.
Nope, not happening. As I had both Lupus and cancer had another three years of specialty chemo, and those three years with a dose every five weeks did me in. I have no internal immune system to fight fevers or colds, the chemo effectively damaged my heart such that am unable to walk more than a few yards without using a puffer. Any form of exertion means dizziness and so far the cancer is in remission; the Lupus just makes the whole affair much worse. Sold the Goldwing to a friend, the machine was on its third 100,000 kilometres and parts were not readily available.The mechanic at the local dealership was younger in years than age of the machine; the machine was not welcome at the dealer. It had been fun. It served me well. These days the side effects of the chemicals ingested continue to bother me, teeth disintegrate and require removal, stamina is nil, frequent restful periods and then wide awake periods in the night. Then contracted Cellulitis in my lower left leg a year ago; six weeks in the local hospital. That has put me further back. It was three months before I could walk upright with a wheeled walker. I hate bedpans and all that
they imply.

Sure I'd love to ride again however the idiots on the highways and byways scare me, they do as they wish when they wish. No form of the best form of protective clothing will ever be suitable for me if there's an accident and the machines of today are so the dealer has to see it to repair it. And because of my physical massive size, most if not all of the new machines simply are way too small.

Maybe at age 66 it is time to stop. Look with envy at times as others riding. However 40 degree Celsius summer days combined with very few riders with whom I would wish to associate and general nonsensical attitude of the whole wheeled world makes me rethinks. Will i die on a motorcycle in an accident or should I prolong my life by never riding again? Suspect the latter is the best course. If my physical and yes mental existence improves and there is machinery to allow me to ride again shall recognizer; until then, not.
A growing number of conventional doctors [that actually give a shit about their patients] are now practicing alternative medicine ie: much less man made drugs and mostly natural substances to actually restore the immune and filtering systems, to cure, rather than just treat symptoms. The rub is, requires radical dietary alterations. Although, very effective, especially against cancer.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:45 AM   #35
d.burbach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2handedSpey View Post
If my daughter said that to me, the bike would be gone. No questions asked.


you're a full-grown man & someone's father. This is more than about you. (IMHO, YMMV)
Well said, I'm about to become a dad (about two weeks) and the thought of my son growing up without a Father scares the poo out of me. Every time I get on my bike I pray for protection, if I was the OP, I think I would've figured the big guy was trying to tell me something (and I think he was) glad he wasn't hurt!

When my wife got pregnant, I thought my riding days were over, at least for awhile, not because I was too scared to risk it, but because at the time my bike (an old CB 750) needed a lot of work and all the money I'd set aside to fix it ended up going to pay for all the pregnancy related medical stuff. Then I got a job working for a motorcycle magazine (RoadRUNNER) and riding is no longer just a hobby, it's part of my livelihood!
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Old 08-23-2012, 06:16 AM   #36
Pantah
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1981 Baylands Raceway, Fremont CA. Thursday night stadium MX, 125 practice aboard my YZ.

Mid air collision on a jump. Faceplant and shattered my left shoulder. Wife drove me home from the ER at 3am with 1 year old son in the car seat.

I was 31 and had been racing every week since I turned 'vet'. I won a lot. But I also had a real career. I showed up at the office with a traction cast contraption strapped to me holding my arm and full of pain killers. The firm got me a headset and more administrative assistance so I could still produce. It was a long rehab, including whirlpools and therapists tugging at me every day.

It was an easy decision. Motorcycles were not a priority. They were a hobby. I had to move on to the important things. The whole race kit including trailer and van were sold all at once to a young guy who I knew from the circuit.

17 years later I bought my next motorcycle. The moral is, do the right thing for right now. It doesn't have to be forever.

Good luck and be safe,
-P
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:49 AM   #37
High Country Herb
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Lots of good advice here, I think.

My wife is a psychologist, so I've learned a few things from her. I think a pause is not a bad idea.

If you do, I recommend you do one more ride just so you can remind yourself that you were able to get back on that horse. Nothing extensive; just a leasurely 1-2 hour pleasant ride in a "safe" area. That will help ease the jitters when you get back on a bike some day.

Next, you should sit down with your family and tell them your plans, that you take their concerns seriously, and that the pause may not be permanent. If nothing else, it will probably get you a round of hugs and kisses.

If you keep riding, a big fat life insurance policy is a great idea. You might also think about making a video or letter for your daughter (or family as a whole). If you actually did go off to Heaven without saying goodbuy (God forbid), it could deeply imbed superstitions in your daughter that would affect her life long term. A closure letter explaining your need for freedom, and desire for life insurance, would go a long way toward mitigating that.

I won't charge you for any of this psychological advice, since I only play one on the net...
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Old 08-23-2012, 12:30 PM   #38
shupe
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Here's my take.
I had a spill a couple of years ago and got banged up. It seems like every non-rider I know asked me if I was still going to ride when I recovered. I thought it was such a stupid question. The question implies that all the time prior to the accident I was blissfully ignorant of the fact that I could get hurt. And now that I got hurt, I would quit riding.
I informed all of them that I was aware of the risks before the accident and accepted them.
That assessment hasn't changed since I got hurt.
I guess some don't consider the risks beforehand, and when they do get hurt they say, wow, I got hurt - I'm not doing that any more. I picture these guys as the ones riding in shorts and flip flops.
I think ever rider should consider the risks, the effect on others in their life as well as one's self, and then decide whether riding is worth it or not. For me, it is.
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Old 08-23-2012, 12:33 PM   #39
pjm204
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I will echo what another poster already stated. For me the reward of riding greatly outweighs the risks. I'm rapidly approaching 100,000 miles logged in the last 4 years. I've had close calls, broken 4 bones, and have been scared on a number of occasions. However none of those situations have ever made me doubt my decision to keep riding. I think if you're doubting it, then you probably need to step away for awhile and reassess. Maybe don't sell the bike just yet.

I would also agree that you could adjust your riding style. Anytime I have gone down, it is because I was off road or pushing my limits.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:46 PM   #40
Colorado Ron OP
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WOW! Thanks for all the feedback guys. I have been giving it heavy thought over the last couple of days and this is my first time back on here only to find 3 pages of comments. Thanks!
To clarify things:

  1. We are financially set, my wife would never have to work outside the home should she choose.
  2. My wife has ALWAYS encouraged my passion for riding, its always cleared my head and help calm me down when stressed.
  3. I have logged over 100k miles of dual sport riding, so I have pretty much been through it all. This is not the first time Ive been down, so Im not considering quitting just because I laid it down once. The drive to ride isnt the same as before (which is a complete shock to me).
  4. Yes it was rider error. What was my hurry someone asked? Beautiful day in the Rocky Mountains on winding mountain roads, no hurry just enjoying the curves. Wasnt that I couldnt hold the corner, just leaned too far and dragged the peg and my foot too hard causing me not to recover in time in the corner. 45mph road. I was doing 50, but hit the 25mph corner and thought I could hold it. Oh well, it happens.
  5. I agree, I think Ill take the rest of the year off. Sell the Africa Twin for now and see what next year brings. My son is 14 and I saw him gawking at a 67 Mustang Fastback. Maybe its time for a Father/Son project and worry about riding once the itch is back. Until then, maybe Ill get back into drag racing and show my kid how we used to do it back in the day!
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Old 08-24-2012, 04:02 AM   #41
ragtoplvr
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When my daughter was born, I quit riding.

Now she is grown, and I have started riding again.

It is just as sweet now, maybe more so, as it was then

Rod
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Old 08-24-2012, 04:29 AM   #42
_Davi_
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shupe View Post
Here's my take.
I had a spill a couple of years ago and got banged up. It seems like every non-rider I know asked me if I was still going to ride when I recovered. I thought it was such a stupid question.
This made me laugh hard. My wife and I were creamed on our almost new Yamaha supertenere last october, in rural hungary.... in the back of the ambulance, me bleeding all over my right side, she strapped to a backboard (but able to move everything) we were both laughing about how we wished the damage to the bike could be repaired in a few days so we didn't have to catch the train home.... Nope, we had to catch the train. But were both back on the kawasaki virtually the next day. The Yam got fixed up over the winter, good as new, thanks to big old crash bars saving the engine (but the repairs ended up costing 25% of the purchase price!!).

It gets in your blood.
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:35 AM   #43
jacqui
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Old 08-24-2012, 08:57 AM   #44
slide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High Country Herb View Post
Lots of good advice here, I think.

My wife is a psychologist, so I've learned a few things from her. I think a pause is not a bad idea.

If you do, I recommend you do one more ride just so you can remind yourself that you were able to get back on that horse. Nothing extensive; just a leasurely 1-2 hour pleasant ride in a "safe" area. That will help ease the jitters when you get back on a bike some day.

Next, you should sit down with your family and tell them your plans, that you take their concerns seriously, and that the pause may not be permanent. If nothing else, it will probably get you a round of hugs and kisses. :

If you keep riding, a big fat life insurance policy is a great idea. You might also think about making a video or letter for your daughter (or family as a whole). If you actually did go off to Heaven without saying goodbuy (God forbid), it could deeply imbed superstitions in your daughter that would affect her life long term. A closure letter explaining your need for freedom, and desire for life insurance, would go a long way toward mitigating that.

I won't charge you for any of this psychological advice, since I only play one on the net...
IMO, once you are spooked you are spooked & should quit. Maybe not forever, but at least until you feel silly about having quit.

Small story about flying. A CEO I used to work for flew himself to well sites, etc. After an engine overhaul, he didn't like the sound of the engine. The A&P and others went over it again and again saying there is nothing wrong.

CEO figures he is spooked because there is nothing wrong with the engine. He sells the airplane. Within 7 hours, the new owner went down - engine failure of some sort.

His 'lesson' to me is to go with your gut on things like this. I say, go with your gut. You don't need the fear & you don't need to leave a bunch of fatherless children. You can come back after they are on their own, etc.
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Old 08-24-2012, 09:14 AM   #45
blackx70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kabagram View Post
I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit this, but I was "spooked" a few times in the last month prior to purchasing a 2011 KTM 990. I agonized over the decision to buy a bigger bike for months, but in the 2 or 3 weeks prior to purchase, I had several things that gave me pause for thought aside from all the motorcycle accidents I see on the news

I sold a nice boat that hadn't been getting used figuring the funds would make purchasing a more expensive bike an easier decision. The buyer tells me his brother was killed on a motorcycle.

I ride to a local mexican hole in the wall for a burrito. An EMT walks in, orders, then asks me if that's my bike. He says it's good to see that I'm wearing all the gear because he had to give up riding after pulling too many body parts off the road in bike accidents.

I'm making a 4 hour drive between St Louis and Louisville completely consumed in thought when arrive at the question "Is the risk I'm wanting to take fair to my wife and two grade school daughters who depend on me?" Then I see a few cars pulled over on the side of the interstate. I see emergency vehicles far in the distance in front and behind me. I look over to see a man putting a towel over the badly mutilated body sitting inside a vehicle that apparently departed the shoulder and flipped. I wonder about his/her family.

I'm working on restoring a 1952 John Deere model B tractor last week. I pause and sit down on a bucket, again agonizing over the deposit I just put on a bike a day earlier. Something smacks me hard square in the forehead. I'm stunned for a second, look down between my feet, and see a huge bumble bee crawl in a circle, roll over and die.

So I chalk it all up to me trying to find meaning in events that have none, buy the bike, and have been enjoying it.

But part of me still wonders.
I bought my first bike from out of state and I did not have my endorsement (was waiting for the class). I needed to get it registered but could not get the bike to the DMV so they gave me a form to have a cop verify the VIN. My neighbor is a cop so he came over and did the deed. He mentioned that he wanted to get back into riding but that he had worked too many MC accidents lately and that only of the three or four were the riders fault. That was four and a half years ago. Meh... in my 45,000 miles of riding, I have had one close call and it was my fault due to impatience. No damage or dropped bike, just learned an important lesson. If you do not enjoy riding and the risks are too great in your mind, then do not do it anymore. I enjoy riding so I continue to every day.
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