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Old 07-12-2012, 10:18 AM   #31
Beezer
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There are no absolutes, and everything fails eventually if you run it long enough. On the other hand, a Teflon/SS line should out last any rubber line by a couple lifetimes. I have replaced lines that didn't look good, but I have never had one fail in service until 2 years ago.

I only have a mental note of the failures that have been posted but it seems to be year 2000 plus/minus about 2 years, with most in 2000/2001. Others with more BMW experience might chime in.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:48 AM   #32
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGuy View Post
So would SS lines absolve this?

Also the year thing; just 2000/2001ish?
Certainly they would solve any issue with the old lines. So far I have not heard of any SS lines failing on any year bike. Not saying they can't, but it doesn't seem to be anything like the issue with the older BMWs, and other bikes/cars.

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Old 07-12-2012, 10:48 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beezer View Post
There are no absolutes, and everything fails eventually if you run it long enough. On the other hand, a Teflon/SS line should out last any rubber line by a couple lifetimes. I have replaced lines that didn't look good, but I have never had one fail in service until 2 years ago.

I only have a mental note of the failures that have been posted but it seems to be year 2000 plus/minus about 2 years, with most in 2000/2001. Others with more BMW experience might chime in.
Agreed, I am wondering if this thread should be stickied constant follow up.
I know ignorance is not an excuse but the more inmates know about this issue the better.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:48 AM   #34
def
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Regarding replacement aftermarket brake lines; are they better than the OE lines?

1- Aftermarket lines are constructed of an inner teflon tube with a braded oversheath of stainless steel with a plastic cover over the braided SS.
2- Teflon is impervious to DOT4 and other fluids.
3- Typically, aftermarket lines provide better transfer of pressure applied at the lever and so brake feel is improved.
4- Unless the aftermarket lines get chaffed or kinked, they will likely outlast the OE lines.
5- Aftermarket lines and hardware come in a variety of colors so you can match or color coordinate your brake lines to the color of your undergarments or anything else you choose.
6- Aftermarket lines can be made to order, lengthwise, custom banjos, stacked banjos, etc. for non-stock brake arrangements.
7- Aftermarket are lower cost that OE and guaranteed for life.

So, are the aftermarket lines better? You tell me.
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:08 AM   #35
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This example of possible brake failure is another good reason to perform a brake fluid flush annually.

Remember, mine is an '01 model with ABSII. Other models may require a different procedure.

Here's what I do;

1- Take an empty milk jug or other similar size plastic jug.
2- Put a hole in the neck of the jug near the opening.
3- Fit a clear tube of a size that will fit over the bleeder nipples on your calipers into the hole in the jug neck.
4- Remove the covers from both brake fluid reservoirs.
5- Insert the shop vac hose into the jug.
6- Fit the tube to the varius bleeder nipples starting with the ABS nipples.
7- Turn on the vac and observe the old fluid as it is sucked into the jug.
8- Keep the reservoirs filled with fresh DOT4 as they are emptied.
9- Move to the wheel calipers and do the same.
10-Carefully snug the bleeder nuts. Don't overtighten.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:16 PM   #36
Jim Motorad
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ABS fail

On a recent off-road trip I lost the rear brake pressure completely. It was a very long descent (3 to 5 miles) at slow speed. I did not turn off ABS. I think the constant activation of the ABS had something to do with it. I also had a low battery at the time. Funny thing is once I got off the mountain the brake pressure built back up. It's been working correct ever since. I have upgraded stainless lines front and rear. Only lost the rear brake. Anyway it was not good. Trying to crawl down a washed out mountain pass with only front brake was an experience I never want to repeat.
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:42 AM   #37
manfromthestix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steptoe View Post
I posted a warning a few years ago on UKGSer about the 1100 GS brake lines failing, and the section that needs looking at.
I had a few 1100 models in for repair and were all split at the same point.
The problem i see with 1150 brake lines is internal collapsing of the brake line, which means the brakes stay applied after you let go of the lever.
I've never personally seen any 1150 bikes with brake lines "burst".

Quote:
Originally Posted by GS Addict View Post
Unless he took a mittfull of the front brake and it did not release when he let go of the lever. It just takes a flap of rubber to block the fluid from returning.
It's happened with back brake lines already and the calipers have overheated. .
This is very interesting and timely; I love ADVrider for this! I have had zero brake issues with my 2001 1150GS until last week when riding home (about 60 miles) I noticed brake smell when I pulled into the driveway. I did a little inspection and found that the rear brake was dragging and had heated up enough to discolor the rotor and burn the pads a bit, but nothing got warped or burned. As I was playing with it trying to figure out what had happened I noted that the brake line near the rear metal fitting would swell/balloon when I stepped on the brake, but it took great pressure to actually get the brakes to engage. After that, the brakes wouldn't disengage. I thought I had a stuck piston, but maybe this is the issue. I've already decided to order a set of Spiegler stainless steel lines and replace all of them, but maybe I'll find the caliper isn't stuck after all. Like I said before, I've never had an issue before and this came on very suddenly. I'm glad I didn't need the rear brake for a sudden maneuver, it wouldn't have been there for me.

Very interesting. I guess I'll see what the old lines look like when I take them off.

Thanks to the OP for bringing this up!!

Doug
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Old 08-30-2012, 10:52 PM   #38
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same here

Today I was repositioning my 01, 1150GS without the engine running, just pushing it across our patio and applied the front brake to stop the bike. The front brakes stayed engaged. I'm ordering lines after I complete this post. Anyone have a link to a good brake line replacement thread?

I'm glad I wasn't going down the road when this happened.
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Old 09-08-2013, 07:17 PM   #39
marc_andrew
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chiming in

I just had the worst motorcycle maintenance day of my life, all thanks to my "trusty" '02 R1150GS. Two weeks ago, coming down from the mountains, my front brake line burst and locked the front brake up right in the middle of a busy intersection. I had to smoke the rear tire to get it across the street, and then after all the other smoke from brake fluid pouring on the exhaust cleared, I limped it home on the rear brake. I called Spiegler the next day and ordered a complete set of lines. Today was install day. Now, I work at a motorcycle shop and have built several bikes, etc, and I kid you not it took 8 hrs to replace all the brake lines and hand bleed the system out. And, the front brakes are still squishy. I was/am so pissed off. At one point I looked at my garge floor and there were 7 different size wrenches, 5 different allen keys, and a boatload of other tools to do the job. Why so many different sized bolts BMW? If you had to do an emergency brake repair on the road, forget it.
So, my advice, get the Spiegler kit but take it all to the dealer and pay the $1000 or whatever it costs to switch them out. And do it right now... regardless of how many miles are on your bike. The OEM lines are complete crap and will fail.
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Old 09-08-2013, 07:44 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by def View Post
I ordered aftermarket rear brake line from these folks.

http://cyclebrakes.com/html/galfer_brake_lines.html


They are very helpful.

However, a local hydraulic shop may be able to make up new lines.

As previously stated, the OE lines on this BMW vintage do deteriorate and shed debris into the brake system. Also, as is likely the case here, they can rupture with drastic results.
Same here... I also bought a set of Galfers from CycleBrakes a couple of months ago for my 2003 R1150GS Sport (no ABS) as a preemptive strike. One less worry bead for me! LOL! I was very happy with the product, the service, and the price. Installation was pretty easy too (but then again, I didn't have an ABS pump to bleed).

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Old 09-08-2013, 07:50 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marc_andrew View Post
I just had the worst motorcycle maintenance day of my life, all thanks to my "trusty" '02 R1150GS. Two weeks ago, coming down from the mountains, my front brake line burst and locked the front brake up right in the middle of a busy intersection. I had to smoke the rear tire to get it across the street, and then after all the other smoke from brake fluid pouring on the exhaust cleared, I limped it home on the rear brake. I called Spiegler the next day and ordered a complete set of lines. Today was install day. Now, I work at a motorcycle shop and have built several bikes, etc, and I kid you not it took 8 hrs to replace all the brake lines and hand bleed the system out. And, the front brakes are still squishy. I was/am so pissed off. At one point I looked at my garge floor and there were 7 different size wrenches, 5 different allen keys, and a boatload of other tools to do the job. Why so many different sized bolts BMW? If you had to do an emergency brake repair on the road, forget it.
So, my advice, get the Spiegler kit but take it all to the dealer and pay the $1000 or whatever it costs to switch them out. And do it right now... regardless of how many miles are on your bike. The OEM lines are complete crap and will fail.
Try filling the system from the bottom and use the bleed screws on the modulator.
Same applies for the clutch - see below
I do them on a regular basis and it takes me less than 3 hours start to finish, that includes a short road test.

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Old 09-09-2013, 07:58 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GS Addict View Post
Agreed, I am wondering if this thread should be stickied constant follow up.
I know ignorance is not an excuse but the more inmates know about this issue the better.
Show of hands please for those that had their machines returned from service without any advice to replace the rubber brake/fuel hoses or fuel filter? Periodic replacement of the brake hoses is indicated in the shop and I believe the rider manual. But that will never motivate the if-it-ain't-broke crowd nor will a thousand more threads just like this one.

A systems approach is always required, in this case that means servicing the calipers to insure free piston and slider movement not just replacing brake lines.
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:44 PM   #43
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagerider View Post
Show of hands please for those that had their machines returned from service without any advice to replace the rubber brake/fuel hoses or fuel filter? Periodic replacement of the brake hoses is indicated in the shop and I believe the rider manual. But that will never motivate the if-it-ain't-broke crowd nor will a thousand more threads just like this one.

A systems approach is always required, in this case that means servicing the calipers to insure free piston and slider movement not just replacing brake lines.
Please quote that section of the manual, I seem to be missing it.

Jim
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Old 09-10-2013, 08:30 AM   #44
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I leave that for one of the noobs to find and post. They'll discover so much more in the process.
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Old 09-10-2013, 08:37 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GS Addict View Post
Try filling the system from the bottom and use the bleed screws on the modulator.
Same applies for the clutch - see below
I do them on a regular basis and it takes me less than 3 hours start to finish, that includes a short road test.

I like this setup. I am going to borrow it when I swap out my DR-Z brake lines.
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