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Old 10-22-2005, 07:46 AM   #16
Josephvman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtwind
I had a 88 rs. Can't say it ever felt like a truck. The tiny front tire should actually make it turn easier not harder. If you are having problems you need to go back to basics and make sure everything is up to snuff. Tire and pressure, bearings both steering and wheel OK, springs, etc. K75 bars will help you sit up a little more but don't offer more leverage. The are a suggested alternative because they are still narrow enough to fit inside the fairing. Face it, it's a RS and the riding position was dictated by the fairing and it isn't for everyone. JT
I was pretty lousy at physics, but I think the smaller front wheel increases effort, and combined with the limited steering lock due to the fairing clearance and you've got a bike that's not too easy to turn at low speeds. If a small wheel front wheel makes it easier to steer at low speeds, why do the dual-sport GS's all have much larger fronts? Not trying to dispute your post, just asking the question...and I've had a bunch of RS and GS models of all years...
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Old 10-22-2005, 03:16 PM   #17
jtwind
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Joseph, I could be wrong but my understanding is dirt bike front wheels are larger diameter for their roll over ability. The larger diameter lets them get over bumps, holes other obstacles, easier. That same larger diameter is a bigger gyroscope and resists turning more. Which I think is why sport bikes and supermoto bikes use small diameter wheels. They turn in easier and faster. I'm not a engineer myself but that makes sense to me. I'd appreciate someone correcting me if I'm mistaken, wouldn't be the first time. JT
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Old 10-24-2005, 12:33 PM   #18
lkchris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtwind
Joseph, I could be wrong but my understanding is dirt bike front wheels are larger diameter for their roll over ability. The larger diameter lets them get over bumps, holes other obstacles, easier. That same larger diameter is a bigger gyroscope and resists turning more. Which I think is why sport bikes and supermoto bikes use small diameter wheels. They turn in easier and faster. I'm not a engineer myself but that makes sense to me. I'd appreciate someone correcting me if I'm mistaken, wouldn't be the first time. JT
Yes, smaller is supposed to be better.

On the RS it's only one inch, however, and probably some advantage is offset by using a wider tire.

From a % point of view, however, it's still probably 85% size of handlebars and 25% size of wheel.
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Old 10-24-2005, 01:54 PM   #19
Wirespokes
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JT, from all I know, that's spot on. There's also one other factor, in my opinion, why GSs have a larger front wheel - to grab the soft stuff better for steering.

RSs do require more steering force, it's just the way they are. Their envelope is cruising on the highway, not around town stuff. Once up to speed they handle fairly easily. If the tire pressure is in the low 30s front, and high 30s rear, and the steering head bearings have enough resistance, then all is good. One other factor is the front tire size - on the earlier airheads oversize tires made for harder steering. I don't know about the '88 but would assume the same.

Fork springs and fluid shouldn't have any effect on the steering effort.

I used to ride mine everywhere for two or three years, never started up the car. I got so I could man-handle the bike through the twisties as fast as the dual sports. When I first started riding it I couldn't turn around in a four lane street. Once I had the feel for it I could U Turn in less than two lanes.
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Old 10-24-2005, 02:27 PM   #20
Bayou Boy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkchris

From a % point of view, however, it's still probably 85% size of handlebars and 25% size of wheel.
So I guess this is one of those bikes that gives 110%.
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