ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-23-2012, 06:58 PM   #31
DarkRider
Middle-aged Man
 
DarkRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: West Texas
Oddometer: 608
Yup - living up to the expectations!
__________________
_______________________

Life is a participatory sport - say YES and let the adventure begin.
DarkRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2012, 09:08 PM   #32
PersonaNonGrata
Needless Dickerer
 
PersonaNonGrata's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: North of the Pecos
Oddometer: 480
WOW! Some of your photos are absolutely BREATHTAKING! Thanks so much for sharing them! Very good writing too, just gave 5 stars.
__________________
"I ain't as good as I once was, but I'm as good once, as I ever was" Toby Keith

PersonaNonGrata screwed with this post 09-26-2012 at 09:35 PM
PersonaNonGrata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 09:33 AM   #33
GrizzLee
RubiKon Adventures
 
GrizzLee's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific NorthWest
Oddometer: 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by selkins View Post
The Yukon

The Yukon is really big and incredibly wild. Emphasis here: It is difficult for a person from the middle latitudes to accept with credibility just how wild the Yukon is. For perspective: The Yukon Territory (pop. 34,000) is pretty much the physical size of Colorado and Utah combined (pop. ~ 8 million), or Germany + Switzerland + Austria (pop. ~98 million). About 70% of Yukon’s population resides in one town, Whitehorse.

In the lower 48 we think of Colorado and Utah as sparsely populated western states. Their shared population density is 235 times greater than the Yukon. Outside of the “metropolitan” areas (Denver region, Salt Lake City region and Whitehorse), the population density of the two states rises to 500 times that of the Yukon.

Alaskans like to think of their state as wild. It’s certainly big – more than three times the size of the Yukon. But it’s also relatively crowded, with eight times as many people per square mile. (Not a terribly illustrative measure, since for both Alaska and the Yukon we’re talking tiny pieces of a person per square mile.)

So, again – really big, incredibly wild.

For you East Coast Americans out there, you can think of the Alaska Highway as the I-95 corridor of the Yukon. It’s difficult to get a sense of its wildness if you just travel that route. So, I’ve decided to get as remote as I can on a big R1200GS. I’m heading up the Dempster Highway.
Amen brother.

I've driven the Dempster hwy 3 times and been up to Tuk. I've backpacked in Tombstone and treked through the Richardson Mtns (seen hundreds of Caribou up there) and I've paddled the Yukon river 3 times, I've treked through Kluane park (best hike in the world BTW) and I've trekked through several places in Alaska 6 times now. If I had to choose, I would choose the Yukon hands down. I concur with your thoughts. "Larger than Life"... It's TRUE.

I bought my 09 GS to ride up there and, as of yet, have not done the trip on my bike. I keep getting sidetracked with other treks up there. I swear one, could spend a lifetiem up here and not see everything.

Regarding the Dempster Hwy, I posted these thoughts on my blog.

"One of only 2 roads to penetrate the arctic in North America, the Dempster Highway in Canada and the Dalton Highway in Alaska. The Dempster Highway, we’ve heard is the most beautiful of the two. It stretches beyond the Klondike gold fields to the Mackenzie Delta. It snakes a path of over 450 miles long through the mountains and the artic lowlands. Once part of Beringia, the northern Yukon and Northwest Territories were largely unglaciated, with Wolly Mammoths and Saber tooth cats roaming the tundra alongside prehistoric man. Words and pictures alone cannot describe this part of the world. The sun shines not for a day, but for an entire season. Wildlife abounds, unfettered by the ever expanding domain of man and his propensity to plunder everything in sight. The road is like no other, and to call it a highway is somewhat misleading. It is a gravel ribbon spread over a vast wilderness frontier, which was inhabited first by nomadic tribes and then trampled by fur traders and avoided by the Klondike gold seekers. We drove this road up to the upper boundaries of Canada to a native village, Inuvik, and back again -- over 900 miles of gravel. In a period of 2 weeks we hiked, backpacked, climbed and interacted with the descendants of the first people to live in this land. It was an adventure like none we ever experienced. We were sad to leave". ~ GrizzLee commenting on their first experience on the Dempster in 2007

Last year we brought home a souvinier from Wrights pass


We looked pretty feral coming home. We got a permit to bring them home. THey now reside in my family room with my other collection of antlers from up there. I have to get my B.C. cabin built someday.

Love your great pics of of the Dempster.... Love it!!!! It is hard to capture the tundra beauty in photos. You did a good job.
__________________
Take Care, -GrizzLee
"Nature Sets the Boundaries; We choose to cross"
Blog: RubiKonAdventures
RR: Destination Nuxalk Nation
RR: Our Life Behind Bars

GrizzLee screwed with this post 09-27-2012 at 09:38 AM
GrizzLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 07:29 PM   #34
Argus16
Fake n00b
 
Argus16's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 420
I just randomly picked your RR to read tonight... glad I did. Great pictures.
Argus16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 06:46 AM   #35
selkins OP
No hay banda!
 
selkins's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: The Frozen North
Oddometer: 1,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by StinkyBoy View Post
I just randomly picked your RR to read tonight... glad I did. Great pictures.
I'm glad you did, too, StinkyBoy. Thanks for posting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by THX_337 View Post
Amen brother.

I've driven the Dempster hwy 3 times and been up to Tuk. I've backpacked in Tombstone and treked through the Richardson Mtns (seen hundreds of Caribou up there) and I've paddled the Yukon river 3 times, I've treked through Kluane park (best hike in the world BTW) and I've trekked through several places in Alaska 6 times now. If I had to choose, I would choose the Yukon hands down. I concur with your thoughts. "Larger than Life"... It's TRUE.

Glad to hear from another Yukon-lover, THX_337. I'm envious of your experiences up there. I'm looking forward to check out your blog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PersonaNonGrata View Post
WOW! Some of your photos are absolutely BREATHTAKING! Thanks so much for sharing them! Very good writing too, just gave 5 stars.
Aww, shucks, PersonaNonGrata! That's very kind of you to rank my RR so highly. Thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkRider View Post
Yup - living up to the expectations!
Gracias, as always, brother. When you/we get up to that neck of the woods you'll see just how beyond expectations the north can be!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldone View Post
Little did I know when I put this in my bookmarks and went back later just how interesting this would be with such great photos! Thank you for taking the time for our enjoyment. This is really great!

Gary "Oldone"
Glad to hear you're liking it, Oldone. Putting together a ride report like this both gives me a chance to relive bits of the adventure, and figure out my own "story" about what it meant. In other words, it's my pleasure.
__________________
“How do I stay so healthy and boyishly handsome? It's simple. I drink the blood of young runaways.” - Shatner

Mid-America -- Ozarks (Darkrider) -- Lake Superior Circle Tour -- NW US -- Labrador -- Big Bend (Darkrider) -- Yukon/Dempster Hwy -- WTX/NNM/SCO
selkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 04:11 PM   #36
selkins OP
No hay banda!
 
selkins's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: The Frozen North
Oddometer: 1,487
Back down the Dempster

August 27 – The morning in Inuvik was chilly but fine. A camp breakfast of oatmeal and coffee, and then I quickly packed up thinking I’d get out of town early, as I could see the clouds building to the west. But, it was Monday and I got distracted. Jennifer, at the Western Arctic Regional Visitor Center was friendly and fun to talk with. She told me a few places to check out in town for indigenous art, and where to pick up a free Inuvik pin (free pin!). I asked her about the road:

“Oh,” she said. “How is it?”

“Fine riding on the way in. Have you been on it lately?”

“Not in years and years. When folks up here want to get out of town, we fly.”

One last thing about Inuvik - it’s a town built for a purpose, to serve as an administrative hub in the region. The government and tribal buildings – schools, government and tribal agencies, research facilities – are generally the more impressive structures in town. By contrast, the retail establishments are low key at best and a number of places are shuttered. The one place that seemed relatively vibrant was the video/gaming shop.

Anyway, after checking out Jennifer's suggestions (did I mention I got a free pin!), it was past 11am by the time I rolled out.

The road was dry and fast and I made good time through the flatlands between Inuvik and the Peel River ferry. Then I hit the rain. The road surface as I climbed into the Richardson Mountains on the Northwest Territories side was slick and a bit tricky at times. The road improved (less slippery mud, more hardpack) after crossing over into the Yukon and while the rain continued I was able to roll in to Eagle Plains by 5pm.

Another nice evening in Eagle Plains, sipping beers in the bar and as the sun broke through and the rains tapered off in the evening, I went outside and enjoyed a view of many-colored clouds and hills that marched off into the distance.

Downtown Inuvik



Jennifer, at the Western Arctic Regional Visitor Center, was friendly and helpful, and a great smile to boot



Tsiigehtchic - across the Mackenzie River



Self-portrait on the Dempster



Rain ahead



A popular view of the Dempster, heading south near the Yukon / Northwest Territories border



Evening clouds and horizon from Eagle Plains







August 28 – I woke to thick mist, steady rain and temps that were forecast to stay around 40 degrees F for the entire day. The wide dirt lot fronting Eagle Plains was a sea of mud and standing water. I can’t say I was looking forward to the day’s ride, but I’m accustomed enough to the cold and rain to know how to prepare, and with just 230 miles of road to cover that day I wasn’t concerned about making it through, only how long it would take and how exhausted I would be when it was over. So after a hot breakfast in the cafeteria, I geared up, took one last, long look at Eagle Plains, and rode south.

Several days prior, when I stopped at the Northwest Territories Visitor Center back in Dawson, I had asked about the Dempster. One thing the woman said stuck out at me – “It gets difficult when it’s wet. It’s the trucks, they tear up the road in the rain.” What I discovered is something different.

Riding a motorcycle imparts a sensitivity to road conditions that car drivers don’t experience. The mind focuses very quickly the first time your back tire skips out after hitting a few, unexpected bits of loose gravel in a turn, and it isn’t long before you develop an eagle eye for those loose rocks.

On the Dempster that day the road conditions varied, and the most important thing I learned to watch out for was, as the woman in Dawson had said, the deep tracks of trucks. But not because the trucks had “torn up the road,” rather because when they cut deep tracks I knew that a layer of slick mud was sitting atop the road surface. When I saw the truck tracks ahead, or when I saw them deepen, I knew to slow down and prepare for a loss of traction.

After 30 miles or so of generally good surface out of Eagle Plains, I hit a long, difficult stretch of that “snotty” mud. Probably 40 miles or so when my best, sustained speed dropped to 25 mph, and at times much lower when that mud would get up to an inch deep and it was all I could do to keep from fishtailing. As the mud kept on and on I began to calculate the distance to two campgrounds I remembered along the lower stretch of the Dempster, and how likely I’d be to make one or the other before exhausting myself.

When the truck tracks finally grew shallow and then faded out, I twisted the throttle and held my breath around each curve and hilltop, waiting for the mud to return. But it didn’t and my speed ramped up as I splashed through the small potholes and crashed along the hardpack, in and through the Ogilvie Mountains.

My last hurdles were the two high passes in the northern half of Tombstone. The first as you approach from the north, Windy Pass, rises to 1,100 meters. The temperature dropped and the snowline crept closer as the road carried me along. Up and over Windy Pass I figured it would be touch-and-go at North Fork Pass, the highest point on the Dempster at 1,300 meters. Sure enough, I passed through the snowline and visibility dropped as flakes filled the air and the slushy white stuff clumped up on the sides of the road. But the road stayed clear and firm, and by the time I passed the visitor center on the far side of the pass, it was literally all downhill.

With low clouds, mist and rain obscuring the views, there wasn’t much reason to linger on today’s ride, and after the slow going early on I felt myself compensating by cranking up the GS on the better road conditions, cruising at 60 or 65 mph on the straightaways. As a result, I found myself back in Dawson by 7pm, checked into the Spartan, clean Bunkhouse Hotel.

Flirting with the snowline in Tombstone Territorial Park





A muddy couple of days



__________________
“How do I stay so healthy and boyishly handsome? It's simple. I drink the blood of young runaways.” - Shatner

Mid-America -- Ozarks (Darkrider) -- Lake Superior Circle Tour -- NW US -- Labrador -- Big Bend (Darkrider) -- Yukon/Dempster Hwy -- WTX/NNM/SCO

selkins screwed with this post 09-28-2012 at 04:16 PM
selkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 07:20 PM   #37
tvbh40a
PSUViking
 
tvbh40a's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Idaho home of the fiesta bowl champ BSU bronco's
Oddometer: 1,399
I went solo in July. Not a whole lot warmer, no snow, and just as snotty on the way back. It lured me in with beautiful weather on the way up. Enjoying your report and reliving through your pics..
__________________
"Do today what other's won't, so you can do tomorrow what other's can't." Jody Sears-West Point
“It is not enough to want to make the effort. It’s in the doing, not just the thinking, that we accomplish our goals."
Just tell her my wife said it's OK-Handy
tvbh40a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 08:27 AM   #38
milleralexk
Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: about Ohio
Oddometer: 24
Great report. I'll be following this one.

Thanks
milleralexk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 11:52 AM   #39
DarkRider
Middle-aged Man
 
DarkRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: West Texas
Oddometer: 608
Now your bike will never fall apart - it's got all that great muck holding it together!
__________________
_______________________

Life is a participatory sport - say YES and let the adventure begin.
DarkRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 03:47 PM   #40
selkins OP
No hay banda!
 
selkins's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: The Frozen North
Oddometer: 1,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by milleralexk View Post
Great report. I'll be following this one.

Thanks
Thanks, milleralexk, just two or three more entries, I think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvbh40a View Post
I went solo in July. Not a whole lot warmer, no snow, and just as snotty on the way back. It lured me in with beautiful weather on the way up. Enjoying your report and reliving through your pics..
I'll take the cool over the warm, tvbh40a. That said, I timed the trip correctly, I think. About now the temp is staying near the freezing mark on the Dempster most days, and snow is in the forecast. Glad you're enjoying the write-up.
__________________
“How do I stay so healthy and boyishly handsome? It's simple. I drink the blood of young runaways.” - Shatner

Mid-America -- Ozarks (Darkrider) -- Lake Superior Circle Tour -- NW US -- Labrador -- Big Bend (Darkrider) -- Yukon/Dempster Hwy -- WTX/NNM/SCO
selkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 04:18 PM   #41
selkins OP
No hay banda!
 
selkins's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: The Frozen North
Oddometer: 1,487
Southbound

August 29 – As I said, the Bunkhouse Hotel was basic. The room was 120 square feet on a good day; furnished with a small wooden desk, straight-backed chair, nightstand and full-size bed. Heat came from a small, portable space heater, but with such a small room it worked fine. Showers and toilets are shared and a short walk down the breezeway. The saving grace was the bed with its firm, comfortable mattress and heavy, warm blankets. I slept very well.

All of Dawson had the feel of a city starting to buckle down for the winter, with much of the tourist-oriented bits scheduled to close in just a week and a half. On the way out of town I went out to see the big Dredge #4, which had dug gold from a Klondike River tributary for decades before being converted into a national historic site. I’m not particularly big on historic tours, but I figured “what the hell.” A good decision, despite the close of the season and impending unemployment, the tour guide was knowledgeable and entertaining, without coming off as either pandering or working off of a script. I’d suggest that you go by and check it out if you’re up that way, but then I spoke to another parks employee at the site:

“When are y’all shutting down for the season?” I asked.

“Well, we’re shutting down on September 9th, but not for the season, for good,” she replied.

Turns out that the federal government has decided to go after the Parks Canada budget, and while the decision was made to keep open the Keno paddle-boat in town, the Dredge #4 site would be shuttered indefinitely.

“It doesn’t make sense,” she said. “The Klondike paddle-boat in Whitehorse also does tours, but there’s nothing like the dredge anywhere else in Canada.”

I heard more about the federal government from folks in the Yukon, but nothing came up so often as the Peel River, where mining interests are eyeing a large chunk of the Yukon for minerals development. “Protect the Peel,” was the dominant sign in both Dawson and Whitehorse. If you're interested, go here to learn more .

I rode out from Dredge #4 and hit the road. Three-hundred modestly scenic miles and several hours later, I make my way to the quiet and peaceful Robert Service campground, just a mile south of downtown Whitehorse. Lots of nicely spaced campsites, and I find myself having to rush a bit to get my tent up before nightfall. I’m not more than 500 miles or so south of Inuvik, as the crow flies, but whereas in Inuvik just a few days prior the sun didn’t set till 11pm and total darkness didn’t take hold all night, down here it’s dark by shortly after 9pm.

Dredge #4



One last look before heading south



Gravel Lake, off the Klondike Highway, between Dawson and Whitehorse



Pelly Crossing



August 30 – In the morning I took a stroll along the banks of the Yukon, near to the campground. A big raspberry patch about 200 yards from my campsite gave evidence of a bear that had wallowed around, gorging on berries sometime earlier. Upstream a hydro dam had submerged the fabled Whitehorse rapids, but also provided clean energy to power the city. A wooden fish ladder assisted salmon migrating upstream, and again, the fortuitous timing of my trip meant I got to see some moving through the ladder.

Back at the campground, I chatted with a couple traveling through in their RV from West Virginia. They tell me their thermometer registered 25 Fahrenheit for the low last night. The Western Mountaineering down sleeping bag had kept me warm and cozy – a great investment and a world of improvement from my 15-year-old synthetic bag that I had finally decided to part with some months prior.

Whitehorse has the feel of a town where everyone likes to get outdoors, reminiscent of Bozeman, Montana. Miles and miles of public hiking/skiing trails are just beyond the city, while the town itself has plenty of walking infrastructure and lots of positive street vibe. I spent the rest of the day wandering around, checking out the town. One high point I recommend to all you coffee drinkers is Midnight Sun Coffee Roasters. Tucked behind a bicycle store north of downtown, they roast the best coffee I tasted the entire trip.

That evening, back at the Robert Service campground I was hanging out at the outdoor patio area near the office – comfy old couches, a fire pit, book exchange shelf. Up rides a familiar motorcycle. I had first met Kornelius, on his modified DR650, in Dawson. Our paths crossed three times on the Dempster – passing one another as I approached Inuvik; overtaking him heading south as he broke camp in early afternoon near the NW Territories/Yukon border; and once more as I saw him motor past Eagle Plains that evening.

Probably in his late-50s, Kornelius is an Aussie who one month prior embarked on a planned year-long tour down the Americas – Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. He had already ridden both the Dawson and Dempster Highways. His last day on the Dempster had been a trial:

“When you first passed me, I was just packing up from the night before. It had been raining all morning and I was hoping to wait it out. It took me 10 hours, but I rode through that day. When I made it in to Dawson at midnight, I was exhausted.”

Turns out, while the skies had cleared a bit in Eagle Plains that night, further south it was all rain. In a slippery patch, he lost control at one point and nearly went down, with the bike tilted at 45 degrees and perpendicular to the road. “Then the front tire just sort of grabbed and twisted. The next thing I know the bike had just sort of picked itself up and I was headed back down the road.”

“Good reflexes,” I said.

“No reflexes,” he replies. “I didn’t have any time to react. The bike just sort of decided to keep going.”

Good travel experiences, particularly those involving the people you meet, involve a share of serendipity. As Kornelius and I were chatting, up comes another guy, outfitted in BMW rider gear. Doron is from Israel, and came to Whitehorse via three months of travel through Siberia and central Asia. He’s on a big 1200GS, like me:

“You rode that 1200 through Siberia?” I ask.

“Yes! And Kazakhstan and Mongolia and other –stans. It’s a great bike!”

“But how through Siberia? Not the Road of Bones on that bike?”

“No!” He replies in his accented English, shaking his head. “Road of Bones is not a 1200GS road.” He points to Kornelius’s bike. “That’s a Road of Bones bike. In Siberia they have new paved road across. Just opened a year or two ago. That’s what I rode.”

Doron is also headed to Tierra del Fuego. I’m suddenly quite envious of these guys. I’m through well more than half of my current journey, but theirs’ are just beginning. I fantasize about a different future, where I run into each of these guys off and on over the next year, gradually heading south, and we swap stories at each meeting of our adventures along the way.

Doron and Kornelius are a contrast. Doron is big, loquacious and energetic. Kornelius is more slightly built, low-key and self-effacing. A chill is comes on as the sun falls below the horizon. I start a fire and as the full moon rises we lounge around on the couches telling tales well into the night.

Whitehorse Farmers' Market



Farmers' Market Vendors



Whitehorse graffitti



Katya is the talented roaster and owner of Midnight Sun Coffee Roasters, when I asked to take this she said "I'm about the least photogenic person in Whitehorse." Seems quite the contrary to me.



Katya's joint. Go check it out.



World-riders: Kornelius and Doron.



Full moon in Whitehorse



Inuvik to Whitehorse, via Dawson

__________________
“How do I stay so healthy and boyishly handsome? It's simple. I drink the blood of young runaways.” - Shatner

Mid-America -- Ozarks (Darkrider) -- Lake Superior Circle Tour -- NW US -- Labrador -- Big Bend (Darkrider) -- Yukon/Dempster Hwy -- WTX/NNM/SCO

selkins screwed with this post 10-07-2012 at 04:20 PM
selkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 05:43 PM   #42
MacG
Gnarly Adventurer
 
MacG's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Ga.
Oddometer: 230
I just found this thread. Excellent pics and excellent write-up ! Thanks
__________________
09 KLR
97 DR650
MacG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 05:48 PM   #43
DarkRider
Middle-aged Man
 
DarkRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: West Texas
Oddometer: 608
You can't be close to finished yet are you? I'm expecting at least another 20-30 entries.
__________________
_______________________

Life is a participatory sport - say YES and let the adventure begin.
DarkRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 07:08 PM   #44
CallMeBoog
Done
 
CallMeBoog's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia
Oddometer: 5,523
awesome! You're really making me homesick here!

I was born in Bella Coola, lived in Dease Lake, lived in Cassiar for 8 years (when it was still a town), that pic of Boya Lake almost brought tears to my eyes - that was where I learned how to swim as a kid. from northern BC I moved to the Yukon, where I lived for most of my life. I started High School in Faro, then half way through eighth grade, moved to Dawson City where I graduated in 2001. I used to go Caribou hunting at glacier creek, about 120 km north of eagle plains. I used to ride my trusty TW200 all around the bonanza creek area near dawson.

I moved to whitehorse, where I did my carpentry apprenticeship, and lived there until 2008. My mom, stepdad and sister are still in whitehorse. My mom is an engineer at the hydro dam, and my sister manages one of the shopper's drug marts. My stepdad is a maintenance general foreman at a silver mine in Elsa, YT.

I met my girl there, now my wife. a transplanted east coaster that fell for the lore of the untamed north...except all she found was me. she coaxed me off my mountain and down to the sea, I'm sitting looking out at a coastline, reading your ride report of a place I still think of as my home, and always will.

Great RR friend, thanks for taking us along.
__________________
Don't Ride With Nate!

CallMeBoog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 09:30 AM   #45
GrizzLee
RubiKon Adventures
 
GrizzLee's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific NorthWest
Oddometer: 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilGreenBooger View Post
awesome! You're really making me homesick here!

I was born in Bella Coola, lived in Dease Lake, lived in Cassiar for 8 years (when it was still a town), that pic of Boya Lake almost brought tears to my eyes - that was where I learned how to swim as a kid. from northern BC I moved to the Yukon, where I lived for most of my life. I started High School in Faro, then half way through eighth grade, moved to Dawson City where I graduated in 2001. I used to go Caribou hunting at glacier creek, about 120 km north of eagle plains. I used to ride my trusty TW200 all around the bonanza creek area near dawson.
.
U lucky bastitch... I am damn envious.

I rode to Bella Coola (see my RR) just recently... awesome country.

Boya Lake was neat to paddle in this year.




I bought my bike 3 years ago to ride up to the Yukon... Still haven't done it.
I keep going up there to do other treks (paddle, hike, etc...).

You guys are killing me...

This RR is awesome. Yukon, solo, GS... does life get any better? Maybe, but I don't think so.
__________________
Take Care, -GrizzLee
"Nature Sets the Boundaries; We choose to cross"
Blog: RubiKonAdventures
RR: Destination Nuxalk Nation
RR: Our Life Behind Bars
GrizzLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014