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Old 09-30-2012, 09:23 AM   #166
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The Adventure Begins... The Backroad of Bolivia

See the video

This is a link to a short 3 minute video with scenes of traveling around the backroads of Bolivia. The scenes include some segments of riding over asphalt, gravel, dirt, sand through a dry river bed.

Watching the Wheels


People say I'm crazy doing what I'm doing,
Well they give me all kinds of warnings to save me from ruin,
When I say that I'm o.k. they look at me kind of strange,
Surely your not happy now you no longer play the game,

People say I'm lazy dreaming my life away,
Well they give me all kinds of advice designed to enlighten me,
When I tell that I'm doing Fine watching shadows on the wall,
Don't you miss the big time boy you're no longer on the ball?

I'm just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round,
I really love to watch them roll,
No longer riding on the merry-go-round,
I just had to let it go,

People asking questions lost in confusion,
Well I tell them there's no problem, Only solutions,
Well they shake their heads and they look at me as if I've lost my mind,
I tell them there's no hurry...
I'm just sitting here doing time,

I'm just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round,
I really love to watch them roll,
No longer riding on the merry-go-round,
I just had to let it go.

- John Lennon
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:28 AM   #167
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The Adventure Begins... Kids and Kart Races in Sucre

I was walking around Sucre and came across this banner near the central plaza.

The banner reads National Race of Karts without Motors...Finish!. It appears that every year Sucre hosts a push kart race for youth. There were entries from different regions of the country and divisions based on age.

I met this crew on the street. There is always one driver and one pusher. They can switch places during the race. The driver drives and the pusher pushes. The pusher hops on the back of the kart on some of the downhill sections.

The crew proudly introduced me to their kart. A classic build... 4 wheels, wooden planks, pad brakes, push bar and helmets.

This little guy had an amazing kart made mostly with wood. Notice the wooden wheels wrapped with rubber for traction. He steered the kart with a cord attached to the front axle.

For the full story and a short video visit Kids and Kart Races in Sucre
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:32 AM   #168
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The Adventure Begins... Classic Motorcycles

There seemed to be a number of classic motorcycles in Sucre.


Zanella

Yamaha 125

Honda CB350

Moto Guzzi

Paggio Scooter

For more photos visit Classic Motorcycles
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:37 AM   #169
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The Adventure Begins... Museo de Arte indígena ASUR

I visited the Museo de Arte indígena ASUR (Museum of Indigenous Art).

The mission of the museum is to protect and preserve the artisan work of the indigenous population. The museum contains a collection of Jalq’a and Candelaria (Tarabuco) weavings and offers instruction on techniques used to produce the traditional textiles.

To arrive at the museum one must climb a small cobblestone hill.

Once inside, one can see artisans at work creating various forms of textiles

It is generally a handmade process.

The artisans take yarn from sheep or alpaca and create masterpieces.


For the full story and more photos visit Museo de Arte indígena ASUR
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:07 PM   #170
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The Adventure Begins... Salteñas... a Culinary Delight in Bolivia

In Northern Argentina and Southern Bolivia there are these confections known as Salteñas. Salteñas are savory baked pastries filled with chicken, beef or pork, mixed with vegetables like potatoes, peas, olives and infused with a sweet sometimes spicy sauce. I found them in many places, but Sucre seemed to have some of the best. They are often available in corner convenience stores, but the best are found in specialty Salteñas Cafes. And they are best eaten when they are fresh out of the oven and hot!

These are three examples of different Salteñas. From left to right Santa Clara (Sweet Chicken), Carne (Beef) and Pollo (Chicken).

This cafe called El Patio had some of the best Salteñas.

One can enjoy the Salteñas while sitting in the cafe's nice outdoor patio.

I liked to accompany my Salteñas with a fresh juice or smoothie. This one is made of strawberries.

One characteristic of Salteñas is that the ingredients on the inside are infused with a juicy broth. The fist time I ate a Salteña I simply picked it up with my hand and took a bite. The hot juices overflowed onto my hand and plate. It was a mess. As a result, much of the savory goodness was wasted. I then observed how the locals were eating the pastries. The well versed eaters of Salteñas would take a small bite out of the top of the pastry, then use a small spoon to spoon out the ingredients and juices... a much more refined way to enjoy the delicacies. I learned my lesson... eat like a local.

This is an example of a Salteña de Pollo (Chicken). It contains chicken, potatoes, peas, herbs, spices and the broth. It seemed like there may have been a touch of curry as well. Delicious!

This is a Salteña de Carne (Beef). It contains beef, potatoes, peas, herbs, spices and the broth. It seemed to have a little more picante (spice). Yummy!

And, this is a Salteña de Santa Clara. It contains chicken, potatoes, peas, herbs, spices. It seemed to contain less broth and was a little more dry. Also, it had a sprinkling of granular sugar baked on the top. I would say that it was a little sweeter.

All of them were great. Sometimes the Salteñas contain other surprises like olives and small eggs.

Salteñas became a staple of my diet while in Sucre. Generally, the cafes that sell Salteñas open at around 9:30-10:00 am. They make an excellent mid-morning snack... or for late risers... a perfect morning breakfast. Buen Provecho!
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:16 PM   #171
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The Adventure Begins... Convento de San Felipe Neri (Convent of San Felipe Neri)

I visited the Convento de San Felipe Neri.

Could it really be interesting to visit a convent? You be the judge.

You enter the convent and walk down these long white arched hallways.

Along the way you see some religious artwork.

And you keep walking.

And you see some more religious artwork.

And as you walk down the hallways, you start to realize that there are intricate details in the workmanship all around you.

You look out at the courtyard and realize this is truly amazing. Hmmm... you wonder if you could go higher.

And then you find a passageway that leads you to the roof.

OK, you are up on the roof... this is cool.

The colorful masonry surprises you.

Could you go higher. Try going up the stairs.

As you look around, you see the shadow of a bell tower.

And then you see the bell tower. You wonder if you could go inside and ascend.

Sure enough, on the inside, you find a spiral staircase that ascends the tower. It is pretty tight, but you climb the steps slowly.

When you reach the top, you look out of the bellfry.

You see some beautify views.

You overlook the hills of Sucre.

You overlook the rooftops of the city.

You can almost see the central plaza.

So what do you think? Can a convent be an interesting place to visit?
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:26 PM   #172
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The Adventure Begins... Honda CRF250L Review


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Here is a 5 minute video review of the Honda CRF250L new dual sport motorcycle.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:28 PM   #173
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The Adventure Begins... Adventure on a Triumph Tiger

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OK, this is basically a cheesy advertisement for Icon, but this 30 minute short film features some amazing motorcycle riding on Triumph Tigers. My adventures are not nearly as extreme as those shown in this film. Although I do not think these guys were stopping to take photos.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:32 PM   #174
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The Adventure Begins... Sucre...La Ciudad Blanca (Sucre... The White City)


Sucre is known as La Ciudad Blanca or The White City. The nickname was bestowed upon the city because many of the colonial style houses and structures are painted white. I took a walk around the city and this is what I saw.

Loreto Chapel

Colonial style villa

The Government of Chuquisaca building

Iglesia de Santo Domingo

Plaza 25 de Mayo

Vendor selling popcorn

Sasteria (Tailor)

Arches of the Basilica de San Francisco

Basilica de San Francisco

As I approached the Basilica de San Francisco there was some sort of commotion.

It appeared that a wedding had just taken place. The bride and groom are at the very back of this photo.

It was very festive... with heaps of confetti being tossed in the air.

Colorful and covered in confetti.

As the festivities ended, the people poured out into the street.

As I continued on exploring the city I came across this... a zebra.

It was actually a dancing zebra that was directing traffic and assisting pedestrians to cross the street. I learned later that the zebras are part of a youth program to help street kids with education and job training. The motorist, pedestrians and tourists all seemed to love the assistance.

For the full story with photos visit Sucre
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:35 PM   #175
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The Adventure Begins... Repair of Gaerne G Adventure Motorcycle Boots


As I have chronicled earlier on my website (post 1, 2, 3). I have been wearing the Gaerne G Adventure Motorcycle Boots during my adventure. I have worn them from Austin to Antarctica. The boots have been through quite a bit... riding, trekking, casual wear... exactly like adventure boots should be worn. I like the design, fit, comfort and utility of the boots. But three months into my travels, during some heavy rain in Panama, the boots showed the first signs that they were not waterproof. I had been treating the boots with creams, polishes and Sno-Seal. However now, the situation had worsened. The boots are definitely not waterproof and some of the leather had started to crack. I met another motorcyclist with the same boots... and the same problem. It looks like this is not an isolated situation with the Gaerne G Adventure boots.

Many months ago, I wrote to Revzilla, the online retailer from which I bought the boots, and to Gaerne, the manufacturer, to inquire if they could repair or replace the boots. Neither offered a viable alternative. So now nine months into my travels, I had to make a decision. Continue traveling with the non waterproof boots, buy some new boots, or try to repair the boots through my own means.

I opted for the last choice.

I took the boots to a zapateria (shoe repair store) near the mercado negro (black market). The cobbler said that the boots would be ready in three days. After three days, I returned to the store and the cobbler had not started working on the boots. I explained to him that the boots were my only shoes other than my sandals and that I needed the boots as soon as possible. So, I reclaimed my boots and searched for another zapateria.

I found this zapateria down the street... Reparadora de Calzados Frobana. The cobbler was very nice and said that it would take two days to repair the boots. I left the boots with the cobbler... hoping for the best.

After two days, I returned. The cobbler had started working on the boots, but had not finished. He asked me to return later in the day.

Later in the day, I returned. The cobbler was still working on the boots and explained how difficult it was to work with the boots because of the hard leather and height of the boots. He asked me to return in the evening.

I decided not to return in the evening, to allow the cobbler more time. I returned the next day.

The boots were repaired! As we had discussed, he had sewn a patch of leather over the cracking crease and polished up the boots. He was going to charge me 70 Bolivianos (US$10) ... I tipped him an extra 20 Bolivianos. I thought that it was money well spent.

I was happy with the repair. I thought the repair looked amazingly good and fit the style of the boot. To add some water protection, I applied some seam sealer to all the stitches and seams.

Some times you just have to make it up along the way.

Thumbs down for Gaerne and Revilla.

Thumbs up for small businesses and craftsman that are masters at their trade!
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:44 PM   #176
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The Adventure Begins... Tarabuco, Bolivia... Textiles, Pulmón and a Lucky Horseshoe


While staying in Sucre, I heard about the town of Tarabuco. The village is known for its beautiful weavings and for having a colorful Sunday market. Typically for the market day, thousands of indigenous people from the surrounding countryside descend on the town in traditional costumes.

At the hostel in which I was staying in Sucre, I met another motorcycle rider name Russell. We decided to take a little ride to Tarabuco to check it out.

It was a clear and cool day. We rode for about an hour through some rolling hill country. We reached Tarabuco around noon... lunch time.

We passed by the market and found this little outdoor food stand. Russell was hungry so he quickly sat down and ordered some rice and chicken, a safe bet. I walked around a bit and asked this lady what she had for sale. The first thing she mentioned was pulmón... then pollo (chicken), carne (beef), credo (pork). I was stuck on the first thing she mentioned... because pulmón translated into english is..... lung! Hmmmm... I had never heard of eating lung. I know that I had never eaten it myself. So.......................

I ordered a heaping portion of pulmón! It was cooked as a stew with some potatoes, beans, carrots, greens and spices. Looking at the stew, one could easily mistake the pulmón for beef or pork.

I took a taste of the potato first. It was good. The sauce was a little spicy, just the way I like it. Then, I found a piece of pulmon. I lifted it to my mouth...took it in.... and began to chew.

Not bad! It was a little soft and a little chewy. It had the consistency of a firm mushroom. I could not really tell if the pulmon had a distinct flavor. I think that it had absorbed most of the flavor of the sauce.

Overall, a very tasty meal.

OK, let's hope that I do not get sick later.

After eating lunch we took a stroll around the village. There was a lot of activity. People were transporting good, vendors were set up along the streets.

There were predominantly woven ponchos, bags and belts.

The artisans take colorful yard like this...

And weave it into amazing textiles like this.

As well I saw a few charangos, which are traditional Andean musical instruments with a sound somewhat similar to a ukulele. Typically made from the shell of an armadillo, thankfully these charangos were made of wood.

While in the market I came across another tourist from Europe. He exclaimed that he was disappointed in the market because the street venders were only interested in trying to sell him things. Hmmmm... I thought to myself for a moment.... then I mentioned to him... well this is a "market"... a place to buy and sell things. I understood what he meant, but thought that his comment was a bit odd.

As expected, there were a number of items made especially for tourists.

However, these dolls appeared to be more traditional and perhaps for other purposes.

Russell and I continued walking around, just taking in the local culture. Here are two gentlemen sitting inside the doorway of a store, just chatting and drinking one of the local concoctions.

Granadina Salvietti

If you wander around long enough in Tarabuco or get directions from a local, you might find the real local market.

Where they sell real chacos made from the tread of old tires.

They sell items in bulk....

like coca leaves (used for chewing, tea, medicine and occasionally other uses).

Stylish felt hats

Chili peppers

Balms for all types of ailments.

Offerings for the Pachamama. The Pachamama has a special worship day called Martes de challa (Challa's Tuesday), when people bury food, throw candies, and burn incense.

In some cases, celebrants assist traditional priests, known as yatiris in Aymara, in performing ancient rites to bring good luck or the good will of the goddess.

This man dressed in a traditional outfit was buying grain by the bulk.

In this area of the market I did not see any tourists, just locals going about their regular routine of shopping.

As I was walking down the street this scene caught my eye. It was a blacksmith's shop. The natural light from the outside was casting light inside the workshop perfectly to highlight the anvil. The furnace was stoked, the craftsman's tools were hanging on the wall, and remnants of the man's work laid about the floor. It was a scene strait out of the 1800's.

We met the blacksmith. Russell was about to take a photo of the man, when the blacksmith interjected... he wanted money for a photo. There was an awkward pause. I do not think either us wanted to pay for a photo.

I reengaged the man. I said that I was interested in his workshop, because I had never seen a shop like his. He explained that he made mostly horseshoes and pick axes for agriculture use. He proudly showed me a few of his products. I said that I was interested in buying a horseshoe. He said that he would sell four for 40 Bolivianos. I said that I only wanted one. He looked puzzled. I think that typically anyone buying horseshoes for a horse would buy four or at least two. He said that he would sell me two for 20 Bolivianos. I said once again that I only wanted one and handed him 10 Bolivianos. He took my money, I took a horseshoe. We shook hands.

I then asked him if I could take a photo of him and his workshop. He stood proudly and said ok.

He then went into a demonstration of how he stoked the furnace to heat the steal. And, how he pounded the steel to form a shape. Amazing.
See video
Here is a short 1 minute video with the master at work.


Russell and I walked around a little more. Then called it a day and rode back to Sucre.

There seems to be layers in life in Bolivia. Sometimes one just needs to slow down, wander, perhaps get lost to uncover the really good parts.

For the full story with photos visit Tarabuco, Bolivia... Textiles, Pulmón and a Lucky Horseshoe
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:52 PM   #177
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The Adventure Begins... Sure... I Am Always Willing To Help Out A Buddy


I introduced you to Russell in my previous post. We met in Sucre and took a nice little day trip to see a colorful market in Trabuco, Bolivia. It seems that Randall had gone "walkabout" in the mountain area outside of Sucre for a few days. He had returned to Sucre, but had lost his jacket somewhere out in the wilderness.

Well, I had been staying in Sucre for about two weeks, just seeing the sights and relaxing. I had seen and done just about everything that I wanted to do... and was ready to move on to the next destination.

Then Russell came up to me and asked if I wanted to go on another little ride. A mission to recover his jacket from the wilderness. I had already packed my bag and was ready to leave Sucre. But... I said, "Sure... I'm always willing to help out a buddy."

So I dropped my bag, filled up my tank, filled up my extra tank too... and we headed down the road.

Which after about an hour of riding turned into a winding dirt road. We would be heading through the Cordillera de los Frailes, a spectacular mountain range that runs through much of the western Chuquisaca and northern Potosí departments. We would hopefully pass by the dramatic Maragua Crater.

A...marks the village of Potolo. Russell thought that the jacket was close to Potolo. From google maps there was no road... heck, there was not even a dot to mark the village of Potolo. Sucre is on the right. The Maragua Crater is in the middle. From Sucre there was a road that headed north and west, but it ended after about 100 km (60 miles). From that point, it would be all dirt.

Fortunately, I had brought my gps with me and was tracking our route.

The road continued and wound through some beautiful mountain ranges.

We would capture these glances at mountains and valleys and vistas.

We rode for about 3 or 4 hours. There was no turning back... we were on a mission.

We finally arrived at the small one road town called Potolo.

Potolo was a village that mainly consisted of substance farming. There was one cafe in the town, but it was not open. We went to the one kiosk that was open and had lunch which consisted of crackers and a can of tuna.

From Potolo we headed deeper into the valley.

Russell said that he thought that we were close, so we rode along this embankment further into the valley.

This photo puts it into better perspective.

Yeah, I think we just need to follow this semi dry river bed to get to the jacket.

OK Russell, you lead and I'll follow. Off we went down the river.
See video
Here is a short 30 second video of riding through the dry riverbed.

I could not complain because it was fun riding in the dirt with a riding partner. So many times I have had to ride through some sketchy areas alone. At least if we were to get lost, we would get lost together. We rode on...

Yeah, I think that it is down there. We will need to leave our bikes here and go down by foot.

Sure enough, the jacket was there. But it was just out of reach... on the other side of the canyon.

The canyon spanned from about 6 feet to about 100 feet. Russell went walkabout looking for a way to cross the canyon to the other side.

We eventually found a route that seemed approachable.

Russell just needed to climb this crevasse that was about 40 feet high, at a 60 degree angle, and consisted of loose shale. He did it.

Once he crossed the canyon, it was easy reaching the jacket.

Mission accomplished!

Oh, and then he needed to jump across the canyon back to the other side. This was possible because the right side of the canyon was higher than the left side of the canyon. It still makes a pretty dramatic photo, don't you think?

OK, now it is mission accomplished. But we still needed to return to Sucre.

It was about a 3 to 4 hour ride back to Sucre.

We rode by much of the same beautiful scenery that we had passed by on our outbound route.

It was late in the afternoon. The sun eventually set and we had to ride in the dark for about 2 hours.

On one narrow stretch, a bus came hauling around a corner on the single lane road occupying most of the right of way. He pretty much ran me into the uphill side of the mountain. Luckily, we did not make contact and I was able to recover.

We arrived into Sucre sometime after 8 o'clock. What a day!

Sure, I am always willing to help out a buddy.

Stay warm... my friend...stay warm.

For the full story with photos and video visit Sure... I Am Always Willing To Help Out A Buddy
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:04 PM   #178
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Amazing

What an epic journey. Be safe and see you on the road.
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:21 PM   #179
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I've gotta wonder how he came to leave his jacket way out there? ha!
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:34 AM   #180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troyfromtexas View Post
In Northern Argentina and Southern Bolivia there are these confections known as Salteñas. Salteñas are savory baked pastries filled with chicken, beef or pork, mixed with vegetables like potatoes, peas, olives and infused with a sweet sometimes spicy sauce. I found them in many places, but Sucre seemed to have some of the best. They are often available in corner convenience stores, but the best are found in specialty Salteñas Cafes. And they are best eaten when they are fresh out of the oven and hot!

Buen Provecho!
Wow! What a GREAT update Troy!
Your Saltena post brought back fine memories from 30 plus years ago when I spent 3 months in Bolivia. Saltenas were my staple meal back then.
Mostly only sold from street food carts and in Mercados at that time. I found them much better than Emanada's in Chile or Argentina. One of the best meals ... but of course once in Argentina you get Steak, Pizza and Salads .... and great Coffee everywhere.

CHEERS!
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