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Old 06-19-2012, 10:01 PM   #16
Luke
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The ignition and lighting systems are mostly independent, so if one goes wonky it won't damage the other.

Since the ignition works, and you are getting power to the lights, then the stator works, regardless of the measurements.

The lighting system on this bike appears to be entirely AC.

'High beam control' might mean a high beam indicator light. That's what the wiring seems to suggest.

I'd blame either the regulator(s), the wiring that connects them to the lights, or the handlebar switch. You've got two regulators, called voltage limiters in the diagram. The handlebar switch setup is strange, and doesn't totally make sense to me. But it does connect the headlight to the regulators, and it could also cause you to see voltage where you shouldn't. I'd suggest taking it apart and cleaning/inspecting the contacts.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:24 PM   #17
misterlink
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I'd blame either the regulator(s), the wiring that connects them to the lights, or the handlebar switch. You've got two regulators, called voltage limiters in the diagram.
Luke, thanks so much!! It ended up being the regulators. I ordered 2 new regulators from J&P Cycles here. They were cheap ($15 each) and ended up being almost identical to the stock ones (even made by Tympanium like the stock ones, just without the stock connectors on them). J&P was kind of slow delivering them since they had to get them from their supplier first - but oh well.

Now I'm all set, the voltages are reading around 12-13 Volts AC like they should and no more blown headlight bulbs!

By the way, I got the Tusk enduro lighting kit from Rocky Mountain ATV/MC and it is awesome!! My model of KTM wasn't listed on their website under the compatible machines, but the kit is totally universal - the only difference based on the machine you select on their site is whether it includes a battery pack ($190 kit) or not ($170 kit). I got the battery pack, since the turn signals have to run on DC and my bike only produces AC (the headlight & taillight both run on AC). I don't think I'll even use the battery pack that much, but for the occasional time I'm on the road in between trails I can flip the lighting system on. You can also buy the items in the enduro kit separately if you want, which is what I did to save a few bucks since I didn't need a couple of the items that my bike already had.
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:05 PM   #18
zoltan
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Originally Posted by misterlink View Post
I have a similar problem - I just got a 1995 KTM LC4 400 (I think it's the Super Competition model, see pic below - I can supply the VIN if that helps). It had been sitting for 8 years and I got it for a good price - after cleaning the carb and fixing some other odds and ends, I fired it up and the headlight worked until I revved the bike and it quickly blew out.





I checked the voltage going to the headlight, and the readings were pretty weird (all readings are in AC volts):



Switch set to "high" beam
8V to the Green (low beam) lead (I assume there shouldn't be any voltage here)
12.5V (idle) to 20V (revved up) to the Blue (high beam) lead

Switch set to "low" beam
12V (idle) to 12.5V (revved up) to the Green (low beam) lead
16V (idle) to 20V (revved up) to the Blue (high beam) lead (I assume there shouldn't be any voltage here)

Obviously, the 20V is what blew the bulb, although judging by the readings you'd think only the high beam filament would have gone. Both filaments blew (if I remember right, they blew at different times within the few minutes that I was testing the headlight so both the high and low beams must have gotten big spikes in voltage).

Does anyone have an idea why there was still voltage going to the high/low headlight leads even when the switch wasn't selected on that setting? The interesting thing is that my test light with an LED bulb only lights up as expected, when connected to the high lead and the switch is set to high and when connected to the low lead and the switch is set to low (it doesn't light up when connected to the low lead and the switch is set to high, and vice versa).

I also checked the voltage readings to the tail light, and at first I got some high readings but then they stayed more normal. Here are the readings I'm getting now (also in AC volts):

Running light ("low" filament in tail light switched on)
4V (idle) to 2V (revved up) to the high beam lead (I assume there shouldn't be any voltage here)
11.7V (consistent at idle and revved up) to the low beam lead

Brake actuated ("high" + "low" filaments in tail light switched on)
12V (idle) to 13V (revved up) to the high beam lead
11.7V (consistent at idle and revved up) to the low beam lead

The tail light is working fine now; the high readings I saw initially around 16-18V stopped after I connected the brake light switches to the master cylinders (they weren't hooked up originally) - maybe that fixed the problem.

According to the wiring diagram, it looks like the two voltage regulators only connect to the brake light and not the headlight. Take a look at the diagram below - do you guys think the headlight is just getting straight unregulated AC power from the stator? That's what it looks like to me.



A mechanic I talked to thought that if I was getting AC (not DC) voltage to the headlight, it probably means that it's coming straight from the stator and not going through a regulator first (since most bikes run the majority of the system on DC). If that's the case, then it doesn't make sense that the tail light voltage is also AC. Does this entire bike just run on AC? I guess since it doesn't have turn signals or much to run other than the headlight, tail light, and tachometer light that could make sense.

Anyway, I just need to figure out if I need to replace one (or both) of the regulators, or if I need to replace the stator. I've spent many hours reading all of the helpful stator threads here, here, here, and here. I compared my stator readings to those in these threads, and the resistance readings look more or less normal although the voltage readings seem to be off:

Stator Output Voltage (varies a ton when kick starting the bike)
Black to Red: 6-33V AC (on Luke's post here he says it should be 100-200V AC)
Black to Green: 1-20V AC (on that same post Luke says it should be about 1V AC)

Stator Resistance
Black to Red: 1636 Ohms
Black to Green: 23.5 Ohms
Red to Green: 1659 Ohms
Yellow to Blue: 0.1 Ohms (on other threads it looks like this should usually be 0.2 or higher)

Coil Resistance (checked it just for the heck of it to make sure the stator hasn't damaged the coil - even though the bike still runs)
Orange to Red: All over the place - 0, 0.5, 1.5, 0L
Blue to Green: 99.7 Ohms
Spark plug wire to Black: 7020 Ohms
Spark plug wire to Green: 7110 Ohms
Spark plug wire to Orange: 54000 Ohms
Spark plug wire to Red: 54000 Ohms

I'm pretty sure the wiring diagram shown above is the right one for my bike (the owner's manual I have covers a bunch of different models and has a bunch of wiring diagrams). Does anyone know where I can get a more detailed shop service manual? Here is a pic of the owner's manual cover:



All of the components on the wiring diagram match up with what I'm seeing on the bike except that I don't have a horn. Also, I noticed a couple of loose wire connections behind the headlight - it looks like this one goes to the tachometer light (which isn't in use now because an aftermarket ICO trip meter has been installed):









And according to the wiring diagram these wires should probably go to the "high beam control" (#2 on the diagram). I'm not sure what that is - any ideas? This is separate from the combination switch for the headlight, horn, and kill switch (#4 on the diagram).



On this bike, according to http://transmic.net/en/sem.htm it looks like the CDI is built in with the coil, right? I want to make sure I don't damage the CDI/coil by riding it too much while the voltage is so high. I assume it's best to not run the engine any more than necessary until I figure this out, right?

I rode the bike around yesterday and it started sputtering a little on me; it kind of felt like it was running out of gas or fouling the spark plug. It cleared out though and ran pretty strong for a while too. It could very well be a carburetor issue (the bike started with 1 kick and ran perfect at first after I cleaned the carb, but is now hard to start and leaks gas out of the carb overflow after I'm done riding) but I'm wondering if it could be also be an electrical issue. I'm waiting for the carb gasket kit (on backorder, probably coming from Austria) and I'm hoping that once I put in all new gaskets and o-rings in the carb it will fix the sputtering and leaking issue (I already installed a brand new needle & seat valve).

Anyway, I'm pulling my hair out on this one - kind of stuck and I don't want to buy the wrong parts. If anyone can help point me in the right direction as to whether I should get a new stator or voltage regulator(s), that would be awesome!

Lincoln
i am having over voltage issues with my 97 Lc4 400 SC (no blinkers,no battery, etc..) as well, and have the same schematic in my book. i am reading 14-20 VAC at the tail and head light and would like to measure resistance at the cap but cannot find it. can someone point me in the right direction?
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:23 PM   #19
bmwktmbill
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Link,
I'd disconnect everything electrical and ride the machine with just the ignition hooked up and get it running first without any lights, etc...pull any fuses not needed to fire it.

After it runs reconnect one circuit at a time....

With KTM brown is usually a ground and should never show volts.

The wiring diagram is simple enough. The voltage limiter#7, what is that the regulator? What volts come out of it?
bill
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:55 PM   #20
misterlink
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoltan View Post
i am having over voltage issues with my 97 Lc4 400 SC (no blinkers,no battery, etc..) as well, and have the same schematic in my book. i am reading 14-20 VAC at the tail and head light and would like to measure resistance at the cap but cannot find it. can someone point me in the right direction?
Zoltan, like I posted above - my problem ended up being the regulators and if you are getting readings as high as 20 volts you probably need new regulators too. I ordered 2 new regulators from J&P Cycles here. They were cheap ($15 each) and ended up being almost identical to the stock ones (even made by Tympanium like the stock ones, just without the stock connectors on them). J&P was kind of slow delivering them since they had to get them from their supplier first - but oh well. You could also get them from other sites that may be faster than J&P Cycles like here, here or here (last one is an adjustable type, not a necessary feature but could be handy).

What cap did you want to measure resistance at? I don't think you'll even need to worry about measuring it if you put the new regulators in. Once you do you should have normal readings around 12-13 Volts AC.
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Old 10-10-2012, 08:57 AM   #21
zoltan
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thanks for the reply and the links. i was just wanting to check the cap before i ordered the Regs., just to make sure it is in spec.
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Old 10-10-2012, 04:42 PM   #22
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thanks for the reply and the links. i was just wanting to check the cap before i ordered the Regs., just to make sure it is in spec.
No problem - I still don't know what cap you are talking about checking, but given that you are seeing readings around 20 Volts I would be willing to bet the regulators are your problem.
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Old 11-05-2012, 01:19 PM   #23
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So I ended up buying two voltage regulators at Elite Motorsports in Loveland, CO for about the same $$ as online and didn't have to wait on the order. It was nice to be able to buy local.
Voltage is steady(at idle) at around 13v. The next problem to pop up is that the front brake light switch has gone out. It worked in the past but now i'm not reading continuity when it's engaged. I'm ordering a new one but was just curious about why the old one quit working. I guess i just thought that a switch would be more robust and be able to handle the overvoltage.
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Old 11-05-2012, 01:24 PM   #24
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So I ended up buying two voltage regulators at Elite Motorsports in Loveland, CO for about the same $$ as online and didn't have to wait on the order. It was nice to be able to buy local.
Voltage is steady(at idle) at around 13v. The next problem to pop up is that the front brake light switch has gone out. It worked in the past but now i'm not reading continuity when it's engaged. I'm ordering a new one but was just curious about why the old one quit working. I guess i just thought that a switch would be more robust and be able to handle the overvoltage.
Good to hear, glad that solved the problem! That is a little strange about the brake light switch, but I guess it could have been a combination of age, corrosion, overvoltage, etc that made it fail. At least it's a cheap and easy fix!
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Old 11-05-2012, 01:41 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by misterlink View Post
Good to hear, glad that solved the problem! That is a little strange about the brake light switch, but I guess it could have been a combination of age, corrosion, overvoltage, etc that made it fail. At least it's a cheap and easy fix!
Misterlink, please check your PM's
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Old 03-03-2013, 07:33 PM   #26
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So my over voltage problem has returned. I am getting high readings at the headlight when i rev the motor, 30-40v. I have not looked at it too much yet, just wondering if anybody has suggestions on what would make one or both new voltage regulators go bad?
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:03 AM   #27
misterlink
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Maybe it's a problem with the stator putting out too much or inconsistent voltage? There are some pretty good threads on here about KTM stators - I would read through them if you haven't already.

Lincoln
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Old 03-04-2013, 11:43 AM   #28
zoltan
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Maybe it's a problem with the stator putting out too much or inconsistent voltage? There are some pretty good threads on here about KTM stators - I would read through them if you haven't already.

Lincoln
Thanks, i'll look into it
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Old 03-29-2013, 05:53 PM   #29
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easy enough fix once I actually looked at it. i had a bad connection at the crimp connectors that I used that caused one of them burn up a little.
the crimp connectors that I used were the generic yellow barrel ones that can be found at any hardware store. what type of device would be better for this application?
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:25 PM   #30
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easy enough fix once I actually looked at it. i had a bad connection at the crimp connectors that I used that caused one of them burn up a little.
the crimp connectors that I used were the generic yellow barrel ones that can be found at any hardware store. what type of device would be better for this application?
Cut or grind off the yellow plastic over the to be crimped area.
Insert wire and crimp. If using srink insulation apply brfore inserting wire.
Crimp the wire then solder after moving insulation back up the wire.

Apply the shrink insutation or tape and reconnect.

Be neat.

You can use the soldering iron to shrink the insulation carefully into place.

bill
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'02 KTM 640 Adventure-lowered
"On the road there are no special cases."
Cormack McCarthy-The Crossing

The faster it goes the faster it breaks.
And high performance=high maintenance.
Bill Shockley
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