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Old 11-14-2012, 03:24 PM   #1
HappyHighwayman OP
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First flat on F800GS

So yesterday I was 1 mile from my house when things felt a little "off" so I pulled over and check my tires and the rear one was looking rather flat. I noticed it right after I rode over some light rain lines but that might just be a coincidence. I was only 1 mile from my house so I chanced on riding it back very slowly and carefully as to not have to dump the bike on a busy street during rush hour.

When I was at work I got it towed to my dealer who swapped both tires for me (I already had purchased replacements). They had 10,000 miles on them so I didn't feel so bad about changing them, and the tow was free with BMW's roadside assistance so they only downside was being late to work yesterday.

People suggested I carry a "patch kit" but of course, the F800GS has tubed tires so I don't think they can be patched and pumped road side. Aside from:

1. Carrying everything one needs to physically remove the tire, take off the tire, replace the tube and put the tire back on, road side

2. Buying new wheels that support tubeless tires (We're talking $2000 here from Woody's Wheels or something)

are there any options for tubed tire riders should we get a flat in a bad situation outside of cellular phone range?
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Old 11-14-2012, 03:41 PM   #2
Motorfiets
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Location: North of Jack Daniel's, South of Country Music
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I personally carry a small tool kit that has been improved upon over time that includes a few CO2 cartridges... a couple patches... and also a new tube... I've managed to fix quite a few tubes on the side of the road using just patches. If you're lucky you can usually just fix the hole with a patch without pulling the whole tube out. Then scrap the area real well. A silly trick is to apply the glue and then light it with a lighter letting it burn for just a second or two... this gets the glue tacky and allows the patch to stick faster. Once the patch is applied recoat the whole area with glue and burn it just slightly again.

As for the tool kit... start basic and every time you work on the bike work just with tools from that kit. If you need to grab something from your shop toolbox take note of what you're grabbing and ask yourself. A) would this be good in a tool kit i.e. - a common bolt etc OR B) I'm just grabbing this because I have one in my kit and I'm just using this because its easier for this bolt. If that's the case don't include it in your onboard kit. Any of this make sense?

As for Woodys wheels? Great stuff!

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Old 11-14-2012, 06:03 PM   #3
1994klr250
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I've had two flat front tires on my GS. I got one about one month after I got home from a 10,500 mile ride to Alaska. Glad it happened close to home, rather than along side the road with bears watching me fix it.

As for the first part of your question there really isn't much needed to remove a front or rear tire on these bikes. I carry all of these tools under the seat and under the computer. There is more than enough space under the seat after you put stuff under the computer. I have two 16 inch tire irons under mine. The box end wrench is 24 mm and 17mm good for both front and rear axles. I actually have more than what is pictured under the seat.



If you have a center stand that takes care of getting the rear tire off the ground. As for the front I ended up making a tool similar to this one from best rest, after getting the second flat and having to improvise. http://www.bestrestproducts.com/p-25...ork-stand.aspx

Second flat, I found some bricks from a school that was getting renovation work.





I carry a front tube and rear just in case. This is how I got my second flat when my first patch failed after about 12,000 miles. Maybe I didn't put enough glue on it, but the tube ended up splitting. It was just a pin hole size puncture when I first patched it.



I also care a patch kit that can be stored in the hidden spot above the rear tire. There's a single torx screw that has a plastic cover to access the license plate light. After that all you need is a source of air whether its a electric air pump, CO2 cartridges, or hand pump. I use a small electric pump from slime. I also used it when I changed my rear tire in Valdez, AK. I planned on having to change tires on this trip.



The best thing to do would be to get everything you need put it on the bike. Then do a tire change at home using only what you have on the bike. Practice that a few times before you really end up getting a flat out somewhere and have to improvise like me!
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:30 PM   #4
Motorfiets
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if you have boxes this works well too

pannier laying on the other pannier





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Old 11-14-2012, 09:03 PM   #5
sorebutt
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I carry of bottle of Slime for tubes and an air pump for just those kinds of situations. One time I made it home 65 miles with some Slime and stopping 5 times to add air. That was much better than fixing the tube on a dusty logging road. I have a tire mounting machine at home in a clean shop.

I also carry tools for patching the tube in case I'm too far from home.
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Old 11-15-2012, 06:16 AM   #6
too old for dirt
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+1 on the slime, but I add it ahead of time to my tire tubes. The cost of tubeless is $10 per tube and well worth it to avoid a flat on the side of the road. Proved its worth after finishing a all day dual sport ride and finding a nail in the tire before heading home (75 miles of highway). Made the trip home without mishap and stayed inflated for 2 days before receiving a new tire that I ordered.
Mounted the new tire, patched the tube, and was as good as new!
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Old 11-15-2012, 11:59 AM   #7
runnin4melife
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Perhaps I am missing something critical about the slime on a tubed tire but shy of a micro hole the slime won't fix a tube, and if it did the integrity would disappear as soon as you started driving. The spoked rims will bleed out every bit of air you put in it. I even tried slime once in hopes that a whole bottle and a plug would get enough of a seal to fix the tire so I could get out of a gas station in Virginia at midnight. That didn't work as well, since the hole was caused by a 16 penny nail which shredded the tube I could not even patch it. Instead I resorted to something novel. I pulled the whole tire off the rim, I cleaned the hell out of it (gas station tenant was nice enough to give me access to the hose and a bucket of soapy water). I scrubbed and scrubbed. Then I got some super tacky duct tape and some silicone sealant. I put a bead of the silicone sealant on every spoke on the inside of the rim and after letting that sit for 30 minutes I ran 3 layers of duct tape around the inside of the rim. I put the tire back on the rim and filled it up. After letting it sit for 30 minutes I rode it around the parking lot for a while, then up and down the street in front of the gas station and eventually I did 90 miles on the highway at 60mph and made it home, with the same PSI I started with (after letting it cool down). I pulled the tire from the rim and the tape was perfect. I pulled that and the sealant was still there. I put the tire back on and filled it up and I could still maintain pressure. It is kind of ghetto but it worked in a pinch. I have since pulled the silicone off but have contemplated putting an actual sealed system...
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Old 11-15-2012, 06:27 PM   #8
too old for dirt
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I guess that I confused the issue when I stated "tubeless slime is $10 a tube", intended to say Tube type slime. I do not know what the difference is between tube type slime and tubeless, but recommend tube type for use in a tube.

All I can reiterate is that slime saved me a flat on the side of the road at the end of a long day. It may not always work, but it did that day.
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Old 11-15-2012, 08:56 PM   #9
Yip
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runnin4melife View Post
Perhaps I am missing something critical about the slime on a tubed tire but shy of a micro hole the slime won't fix a tube, and if it did the integrity would disappear as soon as you started driving. The spoked rims will bleed out every bit of air you put in it. I even tried slime once in hopes that a whole bottle and a plug would get enough of a seal to fix the tire so I could get out of a gas station in Virginia at midnight. That didn't work as well, since the hole was caused by a 16 penny nail which shredded the tube I could not even patch it. Instead I resorted to something novel. I pulled the whole tire off the rim, I cleaned the hell out of it (gas station tenant was nice enough to give me access to the hose and a bucket of soapy water). I scrubbed and scrubbed. Then I got some super tacky duct tape and some silicone sealant. I put a bead of the silicone sealant on every spoke on the inside of the rim and after letting that sit for 30 minutes I ran 3 layers of duct tape around the inside of the rim. I put the tire back on the rim and filled it up. After letting it sit for 30 minutes I rode it around the parking lot for a while, then up and down the street in front of the gas station and eventually I did 90 miles on the highway at 60mph and made it home, with the same PSI I started with (after letting it cool down). I pulled the tire from the rim and the tape was perfect. I pulled that and the sealant was still there. I put the tire back on and filled it up and I could still maintain pressure. It is kind of ghetto but it worked in a pinch. I have since pulled the silicone off but have contemplated putting an actual sealed system...
Did you still keep the tube in it? If so how to handle with the valve hole?
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Old 11-16-2012, 04:04 AM   #10
runnin4melife
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I cut the tube off leaving the valve stem with some extra rubber and then placed it with a bead of silicone around it near the rim with the rubber being laminated in a layer of duct tape.
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Old 11-16-2012, 04:30 AM   #11
cristi-mic
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Just an idea, cheap and verified on more than 25.000km:

http://www.tenereclub.ro/index.php?p...3&t_id=346&s=1

It's important to choose the proper silicone sealant, otherwise it won't stick. And have the proper rim, too, with the proper "shoulder" that prevents the tire from derailing :)
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:15 AM   #12
Snowy
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I carry levers and patch kit etc. The first flat I got was a 3 inch nail that tore a long hole in the tube, not fixable.

The green slime actually held for about 5kms after refilling. With a 25mm tear in the tube.

It needed the CO2 to fill, and when I filled it twice I had no more CO2 and couldn't get the pressure high enough, fast enough to seal again.



You should see the looks on your friends face when you're in the middle of nowhere and you pull out the patch kit to fix his flat tyre after stripping the wheel and there's no glue in the brand new glue tube...and it's the only one you have.

Priceless. I got him on video. He has threatened to sue if I upload it.
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:46 AM   #13
manfromthestix
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+1 on carrying what you need at all times and practicing before you actually need to use the stuff along a roadway someplace! I raced motocross, trials and enduro for years when I was younger and got very well versed in changing/patching tubed tires, it's not difficult once you've practiced a few times. Also, you can buy a BIG tube of patch glue from any auto parts store for a few bucks; those little tubes that come with a patch kit just aren't enough.

For me, the PITA has always been breaking the bead, whether the tire is tubed or tubless. I have had instances where I just could not get it done by myself and have tried a number of tools to help, and most were lacking. I saw an ad for a new style of combined bead breaker/tire iron so I ordered a set from Motion Pro (best price was MCSuperStore.com). They got here last night so I haven't even opened the package yet. I'm very excited to try them as I'm tired of all the old PITA bead breaking hassles and carrying two or three 16" big, heavy tire irons. These are small, light, and I hope they work as advertised:



Doug
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:13 AM   #14
Avner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manfromthestix View Post
+1 on carrying what you need at all times and practicing before you actually need to use the stuff along a roadway someplace! I raced motocross, trials and enduro for years when I was younger and got very well versed in changing/patching tubed tires, it's not difficult once you've practiced a few times. Also, you can buy a BIG tube of patch glue from any auto parts store for a few bucks; those little tubes that come with a patch kit just aren't enough.

For me, the PITA has always been breaking the bead, whether the tire is tubed or tubless. I have had instances where I just could not get it done by myself and have tried a number of tools to help, and most were lacking. I saw an ad for a new style of combined bead breaker/tire iron so I ordered a set from Motion Pro (best price was MCSuperStore.com). They got here last night so I haven't even opened the package yet. I'm very excited to try them as I'm tired of all the old PITA bead breaking hassles and carrying two or three 16" big, heavy tire irons. These are small, light, and I hope they work as advertised:



Doug
This saved my butt a few times already. It costs very little and it is light:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ls_o06_s00_i00
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Old 11-16-2012, 08:19 AM   #15
Tor
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I've used the f8gs side stand to break beads with success. You need a center stand though .
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