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View Results: Amendment 64: The Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act of 2012
Yes 102 73.91%
No 36 26.09%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-11-2012, 09:29 PM   #421
colodak
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Originally Posted by woodsrider-boyd View Post
An interesting article, looks like lots of the regulatory necessities are already in place for CO:

http://nation.time.com/2012/11/09/ma...ons/?hpt=hp_t3

Colorado boasts the only for-profit medical marijuana market in the country; and a look at the offerings at Local Product of Colorado, a pot dispensary with 200 regular users, evidences a talent for marketing.

Among the fast-selling strains are Golden Goat and Sour Tsunami, a genetically engineered plant that has shown anti-inflammatory properties, according to Jason Katz, head of operations at the outlet. The store also carries a host of popular marijuana-infused edibles, oils and even drinks. Business has never been easy.

If mainstream small businessmen gripe about government regulations then they shouldn’t consider going into the legal marijuana trade. Every step in the growing process—“from seed to sale,” says Katz—is rigorously monitored by the state.

The planting, growing, and processing of plants happens under the constant view of video cameras monitored by the state’s Medical Marijuana Enforcement Division. No video blind spots are allowed. Truck shipments must also detail the total weight of marijuana products, in addition to the vehicle’s time of departure and arrival. And every marijuana worker must be licensed, an arduous, time-consuming process.

That heavily regulated system, however, may have helped win passage for Colorado’s Amendment 64, the recreational marijuana measure approved by voters on Election Day. It legalizes the use and possession of marijuana for people over 21 and allows them to cultivate up to six plants.

Experts say that Colorado’s medical marijuana regulation provides a successful model for monitoring recreational marijuana. “The thing that Colorado really has going for it is that there is already a high level of comfort and familiarity with the state licensing, taxing and regulating the above-ground distribution of marijuana,” Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, tells TIME. “People had become accustomed to the notion that this can be a source of tax revenue, and that police can play a role in insuring effective regulation rather than just arresting anyone they could.”

A long-standing argument in favor of marijuana legalization in Colorado is the drug’s sheer revenue-generating potential. Until now, drug cartels have enjoyed the lion’s share of marijuana profits. But Amendment 64 is almost certain to take a sizeable economic bite out of the black market. The law could generate up to $60 million annually for the state in combined tax revenues and savings from reduced law enforcement costs, according to the Colorado Center on Law and Policy.

The amendment also calls for a 15% excise tax on wholesale marijuana sales, with the first $40 million in revenues every year earmarked for the construction of public schools. “That was certainly part of the selling point,” Sam Kamin, a law professor at the University of Denver, tells TIME. “Medical marijuana and legalization have definitely been buoyed by the fact that they are a potential tax revenue source at a time when so many of those have been drying up.”

But the strict oversight of medical marijuana has done more than set up Amendment 64 for regulatory success. Colorado’s strident rules have, for the most part, also kept the federal government at bay. The state’s Attorney General has mostly kept his hands off hundreds of dispensaries operating in the state, only targeting some that were operating within 1,000 feet of schools. “They have a policy essentially in Colorado that if you’re following state law, they will leave you alone,” says Brian Vicente, executive director of the non-profit Sensible Colorado, referring to the federal government.

While opinions vary, drug policy experts say that bodes well for the future of recreational marijuana in Colorado. They point to some promising signs. When California attempted to legalize recreational marijuana two years ago, for example, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder warned the state of the consequences.

In Colorado’s case, though, Holder has remained silent, despite repeated calls from former DEA administrators for Holder to take a strong public stance against Amendment 64. Says Nadelmann, “There’s a possibility that the Obama administration will consider refraining from intervening to the extent they are persuaded that the state has come up with a responsible regulatory model that addresses their concerns.”

LMAO, and if you think these grow facilities are following these rules to the letter, your smoking your own product a little too much
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Old 11-11-2012, 10:01 PM   #422
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LMAO, and if you think these grow facilities are following these rules to the letter, your smoking your own product a little too much
I could start naming off bars and liquor stores that sell to minors. They always end up with a liquor license again somehow...
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Old 11-11-2012, 10:17 PM   #423
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Here's some realistic predictions from the same University of Denver law professor/"expert on Colorado's marijuana scene" from the Westword article I posted earlier:

"But I could see the federal government telling us, 'We said all along that noncommercial medical use is fine, but this is a totally different thing. There are 100,000-some-odd medical-marijuana card holders in Colorado, but there are four million adults. And the difference between 100,000 and four million adults, plus tourists, is something we can't turn a blind eye to. We gave you a chance to regulate yourself, and you obviously can't, so we're going to come in.'"
"There are a couple of things they can do," Kamin notes. "They could simply start arresting people -- close down for-profit centers, and make life more miserable for people running these businesses. People say they don't have the manpower to arrest all of us, but they don't need to arrest everybody. If they shut down one and you're down the block, you'll get the idea."
As for marijuana users, federal agents "could go so far as to start enforcing the Controlled Substances Act for possession -- but they're never going to do that," he feels. "Their interest is in the people making money. The large-scale commercial industry makes them squeamish, and that's what we're supposed to authorize come 2013 or 2014. So unless there's a huge change in policy at the federal level, it's hard to believe we'll go from hundreds of medical marijuana dispensaries to potentially thousands of recreational centers.
"The federal government has been mildly tolerant of medical marijuana, but I can't imagine them saying, 'Go ahead and sell ounces of marijuana to anyone who walks in the door.' I would be surprised if they permit us to fully implement Amendment 64 without a fight."
"I think what will happen is, we'll get a statement from Washington. My guess is they'll say, 'You're not permitted to sell recreational marijuana in Colorado and Washington. If you seek full implementation of Amendment 64, we will either sue or arrest.'
"I have no special insights," Kamin emphasizes. "I have no mole in the Justice Department. It's just my sense based on what's gone on in Washington [D.C.] in the last two years in regard to marijuana. It just feels like such an expansion -- to go from serving 100,000 people to serving four or five million -- isn't something they'll stand by and let happen."

"We gave you a chance to regulate yourself, and you obviously can't, so we're going to come in.'" sounds to me like:
http://www.tokeofthetown.com/2012/07...ed_marijua.php
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Old 11-11-2012, 11:19 PM   #424
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... But they would like to smoke occasionally possibly while having a nice mountain vacation.

My main concern heading into winter is how much slower tourist are going to be skiing if this is allowed to continue.
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Tree skiing just got a whole lot safer . . .
An article in today's Denver Post mentioned the possibility of tourists coming to CO to ski and smoke, and vacationing in "Aspendam".
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Old 11-14-2012, 12:34 PM   #425
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Back in the early 70's I did 30 hard days in a cell and paid a large fine for possession of a few joints and today I see a headline I never thought I'd see in my lifetime. Hallelujah.

http://www.denverpost.com/ci_2199440...ight-amendment
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Old 11-14-2012, 12:49 PM   #426
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Back in the early 70's I did 30 hard days in a cell and paid a large fine for possession of a few joints and today I see a headline I never thought I'd see in my lifetime. Hallelujah.

http://www.denverpost.com/ci_2199440...ight-amendment
Man, a hardened criminal in our midst.

A friends son was busted on a paraphenalia charge a couple years ago. The kid wanted to become an EMT. While he could still take the classes, nobody would hire him because of a drug related arrest. These kind of victimless crimes have screwed up thousands of lifes and been a meaningless drain on our economy.

T minus 22 days until we reach the 30 day window for the law to take effect.

BTW, if you've haven't read the controlled substances act, it's very enlightening. It explains the logic for powdered cocaine having 1/10th the penalty of crack cocaine. By the logic used in the CSA, alcohol should be a more restricted drug than pot, since it has no medical applications. Ironically, the US government obtained a patent on the medical benefits of cannibanoids 10 years ago, yet a schedule 1 classification is based on no medical applications.
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Old 11-14-2012, 12:53 PM   #427
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Old 11-16-2012, 08:55 AM   #428
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If you want to keep 64, you need to get behind this legislation.

It will require the federal government to respect states rights on issues like this. It allows law makers to avoid outright support of legalization at the federal level, returning control to the state level.

Another story here:
http://www.denverpost.com/news/marij...aw?source=jBar
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Old 11-16-2012, 02:05 PM   #429
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Originally Posted by HellSickle View Post
If you want to keep 64, you need to get behind this legislation.

It will require the federal government to respect states rights on issues like this. It allows law makers to avoid outright support of legalization at the federal level, returning control to the state level.

Another story here:
http://www.denverpost.com/news/marij...aw?source=jBar
State's rights? Uh oh! I've heard this before. Who's going to fire the first shot in the marijuana civil war?
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:17 PM   #430
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State's rights? Uh oh! I've heard this before. Who's going to fire the first shot in the marijuana civil war?
Don't worry. It will be a peaceful revolution.



The proposed law is very specific to just this single issue.
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Old 11-16-2012, 04:44 PM   #431
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The CU-Boulder student body holds their annual 420 gathering as a tradition. The University tried to stop it last year. What do you think is going to happen this year...now that pot is legal?

The National Guard will fire the first shots a la Kent State.
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:29 PM   #432
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The CU-Boulder student body holds their annual 420 gathering as a tradition. The University tried to stop it last year. What do you think is going to happen this year...now that pot is legal?

The National Guard will fire the first shots a la Kent State.
What do I think will happen? I think my stock in Hippie Digger equipment manufacturers is gong to plummet.
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:56 PM   #433
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What do I think will happen? I think my stock in Hippie Digger equipment manufacturers is gong to plummet.
If the Digger was worth anything, Hippies would have capitalized on it years ago. This won't effect Hippie Digger sales whatsoever
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Old 11-16-2012, 08:30 PM   #434
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Some of you might remember this from a couple of years ago. It happened in Arizona.

http://www.azcentral.com/community/n...rash-abrk.html

This is the problem with legalization and not having any legal limits defining impairment.

The guy above was "a little impaired" according to one juror, but he killed 4 and injured others.

I realize meth and pot are different, but I think before pot is legalized we need to define impairment.

Remember the inmate (in his truck, luckily) who was hit head on by a woman high on pot just a few months ago? Was she "a little impaired?"

Just my $.02.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:41 PM   #435
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Some of you might remember this from a couple of years ago. It happened in Arizona.

http://www.azcentral.com/community/n...rash-abrk.html

This is the problem with legalization and not having any legal limits defining impairment.

The guy above was "a little impaired" according to one juror, but he killed 4 and injured others.

I realize meth and pot are different, but I think before pot is legalized we need to define impairment.

Remember the inmate (in his truck, luckily) who was hit head on by a woman high on pot just a few months ago? Was she "a little impaired?"

Just my $.02.
Jim
That kind of false equivalency drives these movements.

Cops are trained to perform roadside sobriety maneuvers. If they can't establish an individual's impairment with those tests, they need to move along. Sure, roadsides are voluntary. Nonetheless, they are available to request and plenty of other observations are available.

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