ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-01-2011, 07:41 AM   #16
mark1305
Old Enough To Know Better
 
mark1305's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Oddometer: 5,857
To reach into female spade connectors that are plain brass, ie., not plated with anything special or nothing more special than tin maybe, I've cut strips of around 400 grit wet/dry paper about 3/8" wide. Folded over become 2-sided and about 3/16" wide, they will usually slide in and out. Only takes a few strokes, then blow out any particles thoroughly with compressed air.

And another vote for a small dab of dialectric to block out moisture. When I was learning about electronics and stuff as a teenager, I couldn't get my head around using an insulating grease on connectors. But my stepfather taught electronics to civilians at the nearby Air Force Base and finally got me to understand how the scraping action of plugging connectors together displaces the dialectric from all contacting surfaces and pushes it into any remaining gaps to seall the connection.
__________________
Mark J
Merritt Island, FL

When a person asks you for advice, they don't want advice. They want corroboration.
mark1305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 08:09 AM   #17
The Raven
Banned
 
The Raven's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Off the map,
Oddometer: 4,813
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
When I was learning about electronics and stuff as a teenager, I couldn't get my head around using an insulating grease on connectors. But my stepfather taught electronics to civilians at the nearby Air Force Base and finally got me to understand how the scraping action of plugging connectors together displaces the dialectric from all contacting surfaces and pushes it into any remaining gaps to seall the connection.
I too always wondered how it worked, thanks for the explanation
The Raven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 10:01 AM   #18
stainlesscycle
Beastly Adventurer
 
stainlesscycle's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: morgantown, wv
Oddometer: 2,080
caig's deoxit works wonders. expensive but worth it.
__________________
current bikes
07 gasgas xc300-94 duc 900ss-86 morini camel (2)-84 IT200-83 IT175-78 guzzi lm1-77 pursang 250-76 morini 3 1/2 strada-76 frankentaco pursang 200-74 frankentaco pursang 200-74 morini 3 1/2 sport-74 mz ts250/0-74 puch 175 (3)-73 can-am 175tnt-71 guzzi frankeneldo-71 ossa Stiletto-70 frankentaco sherpa s(2)-66 morini corsarino(2)-63 morini corsaro + many more
stainlesscycle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 12:28 PM   #19
squish
Out of the office.
 
Joined: Dec 2003
Location: Where the Ghetto meets the sea.
Oddometer: 5,796
Here's another tip for using Dielectric grease.

I use a long handled artist paintbrush,
You can can get them at art supply stores cheap (look for the bulk packs or student brushes)

The long handles and wide choice of brush shapes makes these things handy for all sort of things, but especially for greasing connections

My normal routine is to brush a little on both sides of the connection
put the connection together and finish by applying a little dab to seal it up.

The brush allows me to use only a tiny amount of the grease but get it where it needs to be.
__________________
On vacation for a spell
squish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 12:35 PM   #20
Jason_01
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Middle England
Oddometer: 47
Once I have the spade connectors out of the block I clean them with a soft wire wheel in a dremel type tool. I did this recently on the very corroded connectors to the starter relay on my RS, cleaned them up very well indeed though I will probably replace them eventually as the corrrosion left them pitted.
__________________
R80R
R100RS
Jason_01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 03:05 PM   #21
DaveBall
Beastly Adventurer
 
DaveBall's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 1,154
For the female connector I use a fingernail file. the cheap emery board. I cut them to fit and pry open the connector just enough to get it in there. A couple of swipes then crimp them back together. Used to use a jeweler's file but lost it somewhere. Need to buy another one.
DaveBall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 08:27 PM   #22
mark1305
Old Enough To Know Better
 
mark1305's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Oddometer: 5,857
Yep, used to use emory board nail files cut down to width too, but didn't mention it above.

Waayyy back in time one could find what looked like cardboard matchbooks but with thin narrow disposable emory board nail files. You tore them out one at the time for use, then discarded. Those were well suited for reaching in the female spades. But I haven't seen any like them for maybe 30 years or so.
__________________
Mark J
Merritt Island, FL

When a person asks you for advice, they don't want advice. They want corroboration.
mark1305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 08:52 PM   #23
DaveBall
Beastly Adventurer
 
DaveBall's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 1,154
If I admit to seeing those, am I admitting that I am an old fogey?
DaveBall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2011, 09:10 PM   #24
MrBob
Jambo!
 
MrBob's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Boulderish, CO
Oddometer: 7,149
Dialectric grease - It's helped keep the electrical systems on my boats and motorcycles relatively trouble free and greasing the contact before joining them is the way to go.
BTW: Corrosion inside the wire's insulation can be a problem. Wire that is rated marine grade will have an anti-corrosion inner lining and it comes in the usual gauges.
I was taught to remove rust or oxidation with varying concentrations of sulfuric acid followed by a rinse with phosphoric acid to protect the metal. A cheap source of sulfuric acid is an old wet-cell battery kept on a trickle charger, just add water. And don't try this at home.
__________________
"When I was younger I was afraid I'd die riding now that I'm old and falling apart, I'm afraid I won't."
bwanacswan's dad
MrBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 12:49 AM   #25
Zagando
BMW uber alles!
 
Zagando's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: EL18 Rockport, TX
Oddometer: 996
Fiberglass bristles work for me, also Niox is worth every penny

Plenty of good tips here but nobody's yet mentioned the fiberglass brushes that Radio Shack sells---as an active ham radio nut always tinkering with electronic stuff here is super-humid Hawaii I wouldn't be caught without one!

They're found in the electronic tools section at RS...

Another great anti-oxidant for connections once cleaned is a spary called Niox (made in Australia, I can get cans at Ace Hardware)---similar to Gibbs Penetrant---great for keeping corrosion at bay.
__________________
=Zagando=
2003 Honda Ruckus "Rucca"

ex: '94 K75S "Berlina" '92 R100GSPD
'85 K100RS '73 R75/5 '65 R60/2
Zagando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 03:53 AM   #26
Twinz
Studly Adventurer
 
Twinz's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: VT
Oddometer: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by stainlesscycle View Post
caig's deoxit works wonders. expensive but worth it.
Then treat with Stabilant 22 and you've got a great connection. Read this link: http://www.intendedacceleration.com/html/tip_14.html
__________________
Twinz, Montpelier, VT
04 aprilia Futura, Ash Black - love it!
Gone but not forgotten:
'94 R1100RS, '84 R100CS, '76 R75/6 (S fairing)
'80 Guzzi V50 II, '73 Guzzi V7 Sport
Twinz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 11:56 AM   #27
SicilianSpeed42
n00b
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Oddometer: 4
Thumb

Sorry for reviving a dead thread, but I thought this was worth sharing.

I have run into this problem quite frequently especially on restos where OEM harnesses are impossible to find. I googled some solutions and came across this site with some great info. I have been using that DeoxIT spray from my local tool truck which is great, but lacks any sort of abrasiveness to scrape off gunk.

Anyway, our driver stopped by today and I brought it up with him. Low and behold somebody makes a tool for just this purpose (actually for both round and spade terminals). Check these out:



Looks like these guys are the manufacturer: http://ipatools.com/products/diamond...-cleaners.html but they must rebrand them since I have buddies who got them from competitor's tool trucks.

Anyway they make a bunch of cool stuff, same idea of cleaners for little deutsch plugs and even trailer plugs.
SicilianSpeed42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 01:54 PM   #28
Wirespokes
Beemerholics Anonymous
 
Wirespokes's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Jackson's Bottom Oregon
Oddometer: 7,728
I hate using anything abrasive on electrical terminals as it removes plating. If they're rusty, well, nothing to lose. Recently I found Wrights Copper Cream and it's really incredible!
__________________
Wanted: Dead, smashed, crashed or trashed gauges
BMW GAUGE REPAIRS - TACH*SPEEDO*CLOCK*VOLT METER *PODs & LIGHT BOARD*
Wirespokes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 07:44 AM   #29
SicilianSpeed42
n00b
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Oddometer: 4
To a point I agree with you, the abrasiveness is nice if you have a ton of corrosion which needs to be scraped off the terminal before you get down to copper. I've run into this a lot on trailer wiring that has been pelted by the elements for an extended period of time.

These cleaners are great from a diagnostic standpoint too. Say you run into an open circuit somewhere, you can go in and mess around with any terminals to see if that clears up the issue. If you clean one up and that solves it, you have just pinpointed your issue and saved the hassle of tracing wires and cutting looms.

You can release and replace the terminal afterwards if you want to be precise, but especially for a quick service tool while away from the shop these are good to keep in the truck.

SicilianSpeed42 screwed with this post 11-29-2012 at 11:29 AM
SicilianSpeed42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 04:45 PM   #30
ttpete
Rectum Non Bustibus
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Dearborn, MI
Oddometer: 5,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBob View Post
Dialectric grease - It's helped keep the electrical systems on my boats and motorcycles relatively trouble free and greasing the contact before joining them is the way to go.
BTW: Corrosion inside the wire's insulation can be a problem. Wire that is rated marine grade will have an anti-corrosion inner lining and it comes in the usual gauges.
I was taught to remove rust or oxidation with varying concentrations of sulfuric acid followed by a rinse with phosphoric acid to protect the metal. A cheap source of sulfuric acid is an old wet-cell battery kept on a trickle charger, just add water. And don't try this at home.
I wouldn't get acid anywhere near any electrical wiring. The stranded wire will wick the acid up under the insulation through capillary action, and it will slowly corrode the wire away invisibly. Same goes for salt water.
__________________
10 Ducati 1098 Streetfighter S - "Sleipnir"
09 Kaw Versys
67 Triumph Bonneville TT Special
"The problem with Socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money" _____ Margaret Thatcher
ttpete is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014