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Old 11-29-2012, 05:07 PM   #31
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I was...confused. After seeing Frank in Chico, Ca., I ran out of destinations. I gave up on going to see an aunt down in Carmel, Ca. She is a bit quirky, and if things went south, I would have been pissed I went that far for that. Plus, cutting East from that point south would lead into Death Valley - and I have done that on a bike in my 20's. Not again.

So, I could cut back to the coast, but I would have to cut across that frikking mountain pass again - like 299 - and I am still shaken from that run. I feel like a Roomba; there is no more dirt, so I just go back to my charging port. I need way points or I feel like a gypsy. I am just not built for the nomadic life. I just spin in circles wondering what the point is.

Okay, I am heading East - on the way home. I am now on the outskirts of Reno, Nevada. I am looking forward to Colorado and I will choose some POI's in that state.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:08 PM   #32
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Who cannot like 2-wheeling it through Cali? It is picturesque in spades. Gas is expensive though, at an average of $3.14 per gallon. The price one pays for beauty I guess.

If Oregon constituted the better half of a Grateful Dead concert, northern Cali represents the lesser half. Aside from the quaint and isolated beach towns, there were a plethora of homeless and nare-do-wells walking around, pulling their shopping carts. You just get a sense of why the state is in the financial shitter.

Example: Rick, 28 yrs old.

I met Rick at, where else, a McDonalds on my way out of the state. As usual, the conversation starter was my scooter. Inside, he sat across from me......and we had a conversation:

"So, what do you do?"

'Oh, I don't work," smiling at me.

'Really? Independently wealthy?" I joked.

"Naw, I was diagnosed at clinically depressed, so now the state takes care of me?"

"How is that working out for you?"

"Pretty good. They took over payments on my condo, I get food stamps (Cali's version of it), monthly allowance and free health care. What's not to like?"

"Don't you have family nearby?"

"My parents live in Grand Rapids, Michigan. They want me to come back, but I like the weather here and it costs me nothing." Sure...living off the sweat of others. Congrats douche-bag.

I don't think Rick is an isolated case. I think he represents a systemic problem for this gorgeous state.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:08 PM   #33
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Entering Nevada reminds of riding through the deserts of southern California in my 20's. It is flat, but there is vegetation and you are surrounded by mountains. All in all, not a bad ride.

My intention is to stick to I-80 through the more barren states. I dare not take a secondary road; they are few and gas stations are fewer. I imagine skeletons with motorcycle helmets out there somewhere and I do want not want to add to their numbers.

You either go around the mountains, or through them. Mostly, weave around them.


One doesn't have a choice at times about where to stop for gas. Some of these out of the way stations are nothing short in equivalency to a Bates Hotel.

Take this one. I wanted to go into the little convenience store to get some water, but there was this scary-ass dude staring at me out front, and then I saw this: A expended shotgun shell next to the pump. WTF was that about!

Thanks for the gas....bye!
------------------------------------------------

Day 15: 426 miles

I cannot find any camping places...for tents that is. There are a bunch for drive-through RV's...usually attached to small casinos.

So I stayed at a Days Inn. I got a good reference for eats from the guy at the desk, and shot over for Thai at Bangkok something or other....and had the best Pad-Thai. Go figure.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:10 PM   #34
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Day 16: 456 Miles

Same story with tent camping. Apparently, it just is not happening out here in the desert. So, I need to find a place....

I ended up in West Wendover, Nevada. A small casino town in the armpit of the state. I wound up at the "Red Garter Inn" - which I thought was America's Best Inn because that sign was in front of it. I didn't realize the error in lodging until I tried to log onto their wi-fi, couldn't, called the front desk to inquire, and the clerk informed me that they didn't have wi-fi....America's Best Inn next door had it. Oops....man, was I that tired?

Well the Red Garter Casino & Hotel ...and the story goes....was created by this brothel owner in the old west who married a judge. She promised to give up her ways, and gave the judge a box containing her derringer pistol...and her red garter.

The good news is that this shitty little casino/hotel had $22.00 rooms - with the obvious hope that one will do some gambling. I also had a half-rack of ribs and sides for $7.00. Thank you very much! This place was going to lose money on me.

I usually don't like to gamble. Not that I have a moral position on it. I think moral folks can gamble; just like they can consume alcohol. On the highway, I saw billboard ads for the casinos and they show a middle age couple rolling dice...or a grey hair at the slots.
I saw little of evidence of that scenario. Inside, I saw sad scenes of middle-age women plugged into slot machines, on their 5th beer.....and its 1400 hrs. Or, a long-hair guy with baseball cap, flannel shirt with the sleeves cut off, glued to a video poker game pissing away half of his paycheck. When I looked around, it was definitely more of the latter than the former. I just find that sad.

I don't care how shiny you make these places, they all seem dirty to me....on a foundational level. Something is just not quite right.

Case in point: This shithole of a town is 98.5% Hispanic. A handful of Caucasians are in managerial positions. But then there were a handful of young, pretty and leggy ladies - about 21 or 22 yoa - who barely spoke English. They were from Lithuania.

HTF do pretty young girls come to this country and end up in this dung-heap of a town in the middle of nowhere?

Organized crime. My cop alarm was ringing off the hook.

As a cop, I did work with an organized crime task-force - focusing on outlaw bikers. Yes, they are considered organized crime. Just replace snaggle-tooth gold chains with leathers - and they are the same.

They both run women. They call it 'white slavery' and I used to see this type of conviction on their criminal histories. Basically, all the white strippers, waitresses, hookers, escorts and cocktail queens one sees who can barely speak English, are imported from eastern block Europe - from mob sources there (Russian mostly) to mob sources here. I don't know how these girls end up - but it can't be pretty.

Makes me miss cop work.

Anyway, in the micro, I am sure there are lovely and nice people in Nevada, but, at the risk of being cynical, in the macro, Nevada is a degenerate state imho and if it became a big sinkhole, I think, aside from the flag companies having to make new 49star flags, I don't think the country would be worse off.

Check that. Make Puerto Rico the 50th state...and call it a day.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:11 PM   #35
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Utah is not bad, especially past Salt Lake City when you get to the mountains. While in SLC, at a McDonalds, I was leaving when this guy - Kevin - came up to me and asked for some change.

I have a rule about this: I ignore panhandlers you see downtown and at train stations. They are scammers mostly. You can tell true homeless folks...who are either addicts or mentally ill....and often both.

Kevin here did not have shoes. He was filthy. I never give money. Ever. I knew many addicts and it all goes towards scoring a fix. Always. So, what I do is offer to buy them a meal. When I ask Kevin if he was hungry, he said he was starving.

Matt 25:45 "He will reply, 'I tell you the truth, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.'

So, I got Kevin a meal, said a prayer for him and wished him well. It may not be much, but I fed him.


I like Wyoming. People here - even right off the highway - are nice, wholesome.

I am racing a storm and want to find a place for the night before I get hit with it. I found a KOA, got raped at 33.00 for the night, but I am tenting again, which I miss. I just sleep a little better in the tent.

I will make the 130 cutoff into Colorado tomorrow and into Rocky Mtn. Natl Park.



I stayed at the KOA I mentioned in the last post. Okay place, but run by very nice people and their showers were nice and clean - a hallmark by which I judge campgrounds now.
I did a load of laundry and met the nicest couple. I don't even know their names, but there were waiting for their laundry as well, both 63 yoa, from Marshall Texas - formally from Louisiana - and had a twang and a drawl to their speech.
We talked about RV's their kids and grand kids. They were just so pleasant and I like meeting folks like that.

I got up around 0430 and started to break down camp. It got to about 39 degrees last night but I was pretty snug. Last nite at Mac's, some local wise-ass stole one of my driving gloves for kicks. When I stop, I put them on the dash under the windshield and they don't move or get wet there if it rains.

As least steal both so someone could use them!

So, this morning, I used my snow mittens - which I would have anyhow as it was 48 degrees when I left camp. I punched in "Walmart" into my GPS and - as luck would have it - there was one in the neighboring town 1.5 miles away.

I use Wal-Mart's mechanics gloves found in the auto section for driving gloves. They are palm padded, vented and have some rubber armor elements so they suit me fine.

I stayed on I-80 East, but turned south on 230, which will lead me - hopefully - to the Rocky Mountains Natl Park and Estes Park.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:12 PM   #36
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I stayed on I-80 East, but turned south on 230, which will lead me - hopefully - to the Rocky Mountains Natl Park and Estes Park.

That road led to through Medicine Bow National Forest in Colorado.


This place turned out to be a great find. Not bad for throwing darts at a map. I was talking with a HD biker who had the same opinion that I did: This place is a miniature Yellowstone without the crowds.



This national forest is a nice drive and has great sights. I watched the elevation feature of my GPS reach 10,895 before it leveled out. It was about 54 degrees. Another local name for this area is Snowy Mountains as there is snow here even in Summer.






Finally, I get to see a moose! Actually, there were three of them - and they are huge animals - strolling some 200 feet of the road. I managed to get this weak shot when it walked from out of the trees. Impressive creatures!
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:14 PM   #37
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Ft. Collins is my rest spot for the evening. Rollin in here on 287 - the main drag - I checked out the row of motels and they all look like variations on a Bates theme. I had no idea this was a college town, and if I persevered a bit more, I would have found a national chain hotel somewhere I am sure.
Alas, I finally chose one that looked the less scary...hey, it had flower boxes. Ax murderers don't do flowers.

I got my room and, well, let's just say that after finding the wet, soiled washcloth on the shower head, I wore my camp flip-flops in the shower....and the rest of the room. I whine a lot here, but really, I find the good in most things...and laugh at the things many would bitch out loud about.
Like the 'kitchy' 1972 avocado green Tappan 4 burner stove in my room and the dresser whose drawers I cannot manage to open. If my wife was with me......trust me, this place wouldn't even make the list. I don't blame her.

Moi? I slept in worse.

So, I showered (great shower btw) and a bit later, saw Connies Hair Salon, which had a sign that read. "We service men too!" Well, how can that go wrong?

Connie, and exuberant large Hispanic woman was putting the finishing touches on some ladies coif, so I just sat, listened to them speak Spanish, and read "In Touch" magazines. I did overhear them mention Lindsey Lohan....so I got the drift of their conversation. $8 bucks later, my new hairdo and I whizzed about town looking for trouble...I mean adventure.

Lo and behold, just a mile further is Old Town Square - which is the 'hip' place in this neck of the woods. Parked the scoot and commenced to wondering. It actually is very cool down here. It has an older, smaller Naperville, IL feel, with a slight Telluride vibe going on. Being close to Colorado State Univ, there are a good mix of town kids, college kids but mostly my age folks.

Sitting at a bistro, I had a nice beer-battered shrimp over fennel salad with a decent Reisling, and that's when the square starting jumping. It got packed quickly - and I found out this was a jazz fest type of weekend. But something is always cooking in the square I am told.

I sauntered over to Ben & Jerry's for a 'triple caramel chunk' concoction just in time to here the US Air Force Academy Band start cranking out some great tunes (sorry Mark). I listened to that until the sun starting fading.

I get back to my room - and I still can't find the free HBO promised on the sign. Thank goodness for wi-fi, although the clerk did warn me that I needed my own computer - they don't furnish those. Gotcha.

I did spot a hot-tub that was mentioned on the sign out front, and dared to inquire. A new Asian lady clerk met me and was very accommodating. I helped her unlock the gate, remove the cover and she even got me a clean beach towel.

Mamasan then put her fingers to her lips and asked, "You smoke?

"No, I do not"

"Why you in smoking room?"

"Beats me"

"You want I should get you no smoking room?"

"No thank you" The hassle factor is not worth it. Again, I can tolerate a lot of crap.

I soaked a bit, cover the hot tub back up, told her good nite, debugged the scoot and planned tomorrows ride.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:15 PM   #38
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I learned, and made a reservation in Steamboat Springs, CO. Lucky I did....but I will get to that.

My intention was to enter the Estes Natl. Park and the Rocky Mtn. Natl Park and hit the Trail Ridge Pass which many bikers have spoken about.

So, let's go.....
---------------------------------------------------------------



I started at 0815 hrs and the temp was 64 degrees. I knew I should have put on my cold weather gear, but it was so nice out. In less than 15 minutes though, I was pulling over and adding layers. 56 degrees









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Old 11-29-2012, 05:17 PM   #39
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Elevation here started off at about 9200 feet...but quickly increased, and I think topped off at 12,200 ft. That's pretty high.

This was different than Beartooth Pass. It was a good run, but it had it's challenges. At about the 11,500 elevation point, the road conditions started to get precipitously worse

It started with asphalt; then that became heavily grooved; then loose gravel was added; then tennis ball size rocks were thrown around - but easily navigated around; then it turned into hard-packed dirt w/ loose gravel; then water was added to all of that at the peak.

Mind you, all this was at steep inclines and declines and hairpin turns. I was at PF 7 the entire ride; pelvis tucked in, feet and legs under me as much as I could, arms relaxed (wiggle the elbows) and back straight. During that hazard,, you cannot go more than 20 mph.

Then the wind started. My outside temp gauge said 53; but my nose was dripping, some of it landing on the inside of my visor and freezing into snot-sicles. So the wind chill was a factor.

I thought of turning around twice, but as long as the road was not soft (that's when it starts to wobble) I was pushing forth. I am glad I did. The descent was fun which led into Grand Lake, CO.



More Trail Ridge Pass



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Old 11-29-2012, 05:18 PM   #40
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Steamboat Springs! What a town! I can see all the mountain trails skiers use in Winter. I am glad I made reservations the day prior. This weekend is their busiest of the Summer; Art in the Park (which is great) and a Hot Air Balloon Rodeo tomorrow morning. Can't wait.
This town is cool. I realize there is money here, but it is truly Colorado. The women here dress...I call it 'hippie chic.' The full length, tie-dyed dress/halter or strapless thingy....but it is done well, fitted and they got nice jewelry on, hip sunglasses, etc.....oh, and don't smell like pituli oil.




I bought my wife a cool bracelet here from a local jeweler.



























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Old 11-29-2012, 05:19 PM   #41
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Rain, rain, rain...


I made it home at around noon. A pleasant day of riding from Des Moines. As an aside, Illinois had the crappiest road conditions and the most construction.
Thanks Land of Lincoln!
-------------------------------------------------

Post Trip Thoughts: People

First, I enjoyed the long solo trip. I do some of my best thinking driving and this was no exception. This is not to say that doing a trip like this solo is anti-social by any means. In fact, some of my fondest memories of the trip were the people I met....even briefly.

Aside from the rally folks - whose friendship and camaraderie are unequalled - there were many people during the solo portion of the trip that are worthy of remark.

Gary - The Goldwing and trailer solo rider from Sacramento, CA who shared my ride on the Beartooth Pass.

Derrick - The BMW rider who camped near me at Yellowstone - and convinced me that owning a BMW was probably not a good option for me.

Jack & Susan - A nice couple camping at Yellowstone in a re-furbished 1958 Airstream 18 foot Pacer camper. They are collectors of old Airstreams, showed me theirs and they were very hospitable.

Glenn & Pat, Bruce & Gwen, Rich & Melanie - Goldwing riders who I spoke to at a scenic overlook in Yellowstone. We talked all things GW! That was great!

Ethan - Solo rider on his older Kawasaki crotch-rocket who was camping minimalist style (I will comment on this in the camping portion).

Jan - A petite solo mid-30's woman who rode a huge HD and was headed towards the Beartooth Pass Rally. I was amazed how she wielded that big machine.

Barb & Denise - A couple of ladies I chatted with at the balloon rodeo in Steamboat Springs, CO., while we froze our toes off.

Samantha & Diedra - KOA at Adon, Iowa, whose hospitality was evident and gave me the 'tired motorcyclist' discount.

Herb - We shared a parking spot at the Red Garter Casino & Hotel. Herb was a 55 year old guy riding the biggest KTM enduro M/C I had ever seen. 950 cc's and the seat was taller than my inseam. Interesting guy who owns 16 m/c's plus 2 Vespa scooters - and a racing Triumph M/C he uses to race Pikes Peak in Colorado.

Sam & Edna - Met at a gas station outside Steamboat Springs. He was riding a 98 GW and she was riding a big Vulcan. They used to live in Elgin, IL, now live in Florida and have a 'toy' trailer/RV they use to RV and ride around the country. He is 76 yoa btw!

Laundromat Couple: I can't believe I forgot to get their names, but a Texan couple I met while doing laundry at a KOA campground who were just so nice and pleasant to chat with.

Georgia - That's not her name, but she had a Georgia license plate on her BMW and when I walked into the McDonalds in Nebraska, I saw her helmet on the table and just walked up and said, "Hey Georgia!" She immediately smiled and offered me a seat. That's just how it is with riders....especially solo riders.

Brent - The last guy I met, riding a BMW, from Harlem, NY and was just cruising towards the Dakotas with no special place in mind.

There are so many more I am sure I am forgetting. This fraternity of riders is a social class that makes one not feeling lonely on the road. When I approached a rider who was on the side of the road, he would give me a 'thumbs up' indicating that it wasn't necessary for me to pull over and assist. It was an understanding.
------------------------------------------------------------------
Post Trip Thoughts: Camping

The biggest point here is that you don't need a ton of stuff to go scamping. Meaning, you don't....but I do apparently. I started off with too much stuff and my mailing costs for sending stuff home, and my wife sending me my soft-bags, totaled about $200. What a waste of money if I had just planned a bit better.

So, here's some tips:

The old adage that says, "Lay out all your stuff and your money. Get rid of half your stuff, and double up on the money," is pretty accurate. It's an adage for a reason.

Tents - Mine was too small for me in the beginning. I thought I barely fit into mine until I saw a solo rider at a campground who had a single bivvy - essentially a nylon coffin that rolled up and you can almost stuff the whole thing in your pocket. He told me it protected from the elements, but lying on his back, his face was about 6 inches from the fabric.
Both of which are fine if you crawl into the tent at 2100 hrs, get up at 0500 and press on. But if you're stuck in your tent because of weather, or you need to sort gear, change clothes, etc. those small tents are impossible.
When the manufacturer states a tent is a "4 person tent," what they mean is that they can squeeze four normal size persons in there, sans gear, and they will be asses to elbows all night.
Try to find a tent in the western states at Wal-mart or a sporting store. It is impossible! Back here in the Chicago area, there's a thin layer of dust covering the tents on the shelves. Out West, they can't stock them fast enough. Go figure.

I ended up with a 6 person Eureka tent from Cabela's. Bigger than what was needed.....but now I got room! Actually, this would the perfect size for two campers and their gear. I can also stand in the center - which is a plus for me. Okay, maybe I'm not Johnny-Northwoods, but as the sun settles, I am not outside on the picnic bench at a campsite swatting mosquitoes. Neither do I want to spray a half a can of repellent on me, then end up going to bed a chemical-smelling, sticky mess. I will stay in my bug-free tent and read or whatever.

Air Mattress - I refuse to go camping without one now. I am not in the USMC anymore; I desire and demand a certain level of comfort. That made all the difference between a comfortable night and a miserable might of sleeping for me. On the last night, as I prepared to fill the mattress, my battery-operated pump quit - which sent me into a panic until I remembered I had some spare batteries in the trunk of the scoot. Thank goodness! Also, one time in Minnesota when my first tent succumbed to the rain and the floor of the tent had standing water in it, I was on my air-mattress/raft and was bone dry.
Oh, and another thing. I like having sheets on my air mattress. On very warm nights, that was enough and the sleeping bag would have been overkill. I am sure camping enthusiasts will snicker about my sheet set, but screw them. It's not like I have 600count Egyptian cotton sheets (geeze, I feel gay for even knowing that).

Micro-Fiber Towel - Whoever invented this should get a humanitarian award. I can't imagine camping with cotton or terry-cloth towels; always being a bit damp or wet and taking forever to dry. I have one MF towel for me, and 2 very small ones for bike cleaning. They absorb like crazy, wring out and then dry in 5 minutes and pack anywhere. When you buy them, just soak them a couple of times to soften them up. No, they are not as soft as cotton, but its not like you're sleeping on Egyptian cotton sheets. Cowboy up.

The venerable bungee cord - I am convinced I can strap anything down on the scooter with these things. Not the thick, black rubber ones; the multi-colored round ones. I had a bunch of them and strapped the crap out of my stuff and it never moved. I even gave one to some slack-jawed kid outside a Wal-Mart in Wyoming, who was prepared to ride off on his Yamaha 250, carrying a 3x3 box, one end in his lap, and the other tucked under his chin. I shit you not! I gave Cletus a bungee cord and showed him how to use it. My good deed for the day.

Cordage - You never know when you'll need some cord. I brought two 50 ft. lengths of 550 para-cord.....and its a good thing I did. I used one whole length, cut it up, and used it to tie down my new tent which did not come with tie down straps for the rain fly.

Duct Tape - How the world survived without this stuff? I used it to temporarily hold a plastic panel on the scoot and devise a safety hold on for my GPS. Don't travel without it.
------------------------------------------------------------

Post Trip Thoughts: Scooters

I have had a myriad of motorcycles and scooters throughout my riding years and I think I bring a certain amount of credibility to reviewing them because I am not an ideologue. They are tools; fun, wonderful tools, but tools never-the-less. Fit the right tool to the right job, and it is bliss.

My Burgman 650 held up well. It exceeded my expectations in some regards and fell short in others. Others may disagree with the following assessment, and that's fine. This was my experience.

My least favorable feature of the scooter is, ironically, the feature that makes it so attractive as a scooter. It's weight. Going through towns or going up and down mountain s-curves, it was sublime. Nimble, quick response, well-mannered and predictable. I felt very confident I could out-maneuver any full size tourer out there...and especially at slow speed going around hairpin turns that make up a majority of the mountain passes.

But on the highway plains or in mountain passes where there is no wind breaks, I got blown around considerably. Or even going around semi's, when you pass the front end of that cab, you know you're going to get nailed by a cross wind - and even build that into your riding line.

I can't tell you how many times I got blown over half a lane or more - sometimes onto the shoulder by a strong cross wind. It kept you on your toes and made for less than ideal touring riding.

Punching a hole through frontal winds or still air is a breeze. The fairing on the Burgman is second only to the GW imho. Even in the rain, my extended windshield put me into a protected bubble at speed.

But those cross winds were killer. Unfortunately, there is a correlation between weight and CC's. Meaning, I wish the Burgman had more weight but then the CC rate would have to climb to get the same performance. They go hand in hand.

Speaking of CC's, I found the B650 to have enough power to handle my gear and myself. Only twice did I wish I had more juice and that was while merging onto highways. My top speed was 85.5 mph and I averaged 54.6 mph. I normally cruised through the Western states at 75-80 mph with no problem what so ever.

I have extolled the virtues of the CVT tranny before, so I won't belabor the point. Suffice to say that on steep ascents and descents in the mountains, it really shined.

I do have an issue with braking and suspension. Even unloaded, I feel the brakes are under-powered as it were. It's like Suzuki factored in the de-accelerating aspect of the B650's CVT and then made smaller brakes. I would like to see larger disks with larger pads.

For a touring scooter, the suspension is on the more sporty end of the spectrum. Meaning, you feel the road a lot more. Great for sport riding where you want all that information when negotiating turns; not so great for touring comfort. I felt every bump and paid for it. On tour, all those bumps work in the aggregate to wear you down. Although the suspension is adjustable to a degree, I have not found the working combo to reduce the sporty feel and give a more touring, dampened feel.

The smaller gas tank on the B650 made it less than ideal as it could be. Many times, I strolled into available gas stations on fumes because stations were few and far between.

One other issue I had was the uniqueness of a scooter. My front tire was getting a little cupped and I thought about replacing it. There was not one dealer or independent bike shop in 4 western states that carried a 15 inch front tire for a Burgman. They could all get one in a day or two, but none in stock. I would go on the computer at b'fast at McDonalds, look at my route, and looked up all the dealerships on or near my route. Same answer. Nothing. It would be the same, I guess, doing this trip on a Moto-Guzzi. The more non-traditional bike you have - even among Jap bikes - the more you risk not having available parts while on the road. Something to think about.

Is a B650 the ultimate touring machine? No, it is not. Get a Gold Wing for that. Would I do another extended trip on a B650? Sure...if that was the bike I had. There are guys who crossed the country on Vino and Ruckus 50 cc's! I read their blogs and it is interesting. The question then becomes: How much do you want to endure?

But under the 'right tool for the right job' umbrella, I think the B650 is best suited for weekend trips. Shoot down the coast with the wife for a weekend get-away....perfect.

One more thing. GPS. Man, did that pay for itself in spades. Not for main highways and such, but for finding addresses, the next gas station, food stops, for seeing the elevations on the mountains. Also, I don't think I ever looked at the actually speedo. It is off by 10% so I just looked at the GPS speedo for accuracy the entire trip. BTW, I never got pulled over.......although it was close at times.
There were times when I knew I needed to get back to were I was, so I just pressed into the screen of my GPS a waypoint. Like the last night of camping, I went into a town 8 miles away and got confused -as it was now night -on the way back. Luckily, right before I left my campsite, I plugged in a waypoint, so I just recalled that waypoint and got back to camp without a problem.
They really are amazing devices.

Final Thoughts:

I would like to thank everyone who read - or will read - this blog. I hope you realize that this was more than an introspective on touring. It involved my experiences and thoughts on this journey as well, of which I commented on.

My coming home marks the end of this trip of course. But I realized how much I enjoy long distance touring and can't wait to plan and execute my next adventure. who knows what lies around the next bend. If anyone wants to comment directly to me via email, this is it: resultsmatter@live.com

I thank God for the blessings in life that allowed me the time and finances to do this trip....and for the patience of an understanding and committed wife of 25 years.

Some stats of interest:

Totals:

Gas: $591
Food: $431.82
Lodging: $825.95
Scooter: $127.80
Supplies: $402.36
Attractions: $26
Gifts: $23.50

Total costs of trip: $2429.43

The trip was 22 days, so that works out to be: $110.42 per day.

Total miles: 7276 Average miles per day: 330.72

States visited: 12 (not counting home state of Illinois)

Average miles per gallon: 43 Best mileage: 49 Worst mileage: 38


Thank you to my wife Rosanne. Not only did she give me the a-okay and support to do this trip, but she was my biggest reason to want to return home the moment I pulled out of the driveway. I missed her dearly every day.

God bless all you travelers, motorcyclists and scooter enthusiasts on your journey. May it be a safe one and fill you with a sense of awe, inspiration and a love for a country that has given you - and me - so much...and so much to be thankful and proud of. God bless you...and GOD BLESS THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA!!
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Old 11-29-2012, 10:00 PM   #42
Tony K
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Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Union Mo.
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Thanks for sharing.
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