ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-11-2012, 05:12 PM   #556
Warin
Retired
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Oddometer: 1,571
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feyala View Post
Yeah, I just hate feeling like I am "mooching". It's bad enough when I legitimately need help.
When you ask to BUY say 5 oz of flour, tell them you cannot carry 1/2 lbs worth with you (truth), you'll usually get the flour free (and a cup of coffee but you'll have to talk for 20 minutes about yourself and trip ).

Yep .. the 'certified' gas can thing can be a problem. Here they want to stop kids sniffing it! Try to explain, you may end up with the mechanic giving you somewhere to work.

Warin screwed with this post 12-12-2012 at 12:24 AM Reason: carry not cay
Warin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 05:52 PM   #557
beemer67
Really Old airhead
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Fish Limb, B.C. Canada
Oddometer: 213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feyala View Post

Do you have any tips for finding a track off the road where you are unlikely to be discovered, or is it similar to the states (rural area, no houses, go off the main road, go on dirt for a while)?
I think you have it down pat already: rural area, find a track heading off the current road, and go a half mile or more if possible.
I generally prefer to find somewhere just before dark (definitely earlier than you often seem to do ) if only because it makes it easier to see what you have found. Not always fun trying to turn around on a dirt track that peters out into a house, or a swamp, when you only have the headlight to work with.
One use I do appreciate a GPS for, zoom in and let it tell you of an offshoot coming up (assuming maps). Especially handy if you have left it too late and darkness is upon you, because it is often hard to see a turn-off while zooming along at normal road speed.

On another topic, I agree with the suggestion about wiring in a SAE plug (two pin) readily available at Autoparts stores. Just attach ring connectors to the end of the wires and bolt to your battery (+/-) preferably with an inline fuse and the protected (female side) of the plug being to the positive, and let the plug hang down a bit ready for easy access. You could then attach the other half of the plug to a battery tender ( set up the positive out of the tender to the male side of the plug) Besides using the plug for a tender, it can be used for an electric vest at some point (one of my most important additions 35 years ago) Or if you buy a small 100 inverter (cheap , cheap) you can now charge computers, phones, cameras etc. either when stopped or when riding.

Have fun.
beemer67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 07:48 PM   #558
Shibby!
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Currently - Canada
Oddometer: 1,646
If we're talking Latin America, it's much harder to find uninhabited locations. That being said they don't really care, but just curious.

I found out no matter how far I was in the back country, I'd always end up finding somebody!

Highly suggest start looking for a place long before sunset. It sucks trying to find one in the dark.
__________________
Tour of Idaho T1 Challenge - https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php...551f1642711d75
Eat. Sleep. Ride - The Great Divide: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...4#post19193704
Go, Get Lost - Heading South: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=735690
Dirt Donkeys Do Baja: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=671095

Shibby! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 08:11 PM   #559
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shibby! View Post
Highly suggest start looking for a place long before sunset. It sucks trying to find one in the dark.
That's some seriously good advice! Been there, done that ... in the dark that is ... I Ended up in someones outdoor toilet.
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2012, 09:45 AM   #560
prsdrat
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Oddometer: 616
"Back in the Day", as us old farts like to say......we were in Baja somewhere
around Colonet after dark and the fog hit us hard. Visibility was around 20
feet and that was back when Hwy 1 was dirt. We managed to find a track
heading off and wound up sleeping in some farmers freshly plowed field,
as we discovered the following morning. Now we camp before it gets dark.

Keep it coming Fey.
__________________
"Can't never could."-Grandma Belle Marie Bullock-Shuflin
prsdrat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2012, 05:32 PM   #561
Feyala OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Wandering...
Oddometer: 358
Oakhurst to Lone Pine and Cerro Gordo (Oct 25-26)

I awoke at a decent time for once, and busied myself with packing. And repacking. The new compression sack was wonderful, and I was downright giddy about it. Unfortunately, the resulting cylinder, while smaller than my dry bag, was too oddly-shaped to fit inside it. Boo! Eventually I gave up and left the dry bag with Ramsey. I'd need to find another way to keep my clothes dry. He suggested that I seek out a waterproof duffel bag from a military surplus store, and thus I gained a quest for the day.

I left later than I had planned to, and scampered over the hills and down into Fresno. While there, I grabbed some toe socks, a spare tube and patch kit, and a waterproof duffel bag at various shops. I figured that these things wouldn't be too common in small towns. It was late afternoon by the time I left the city.

After a few hours of boring highway, I found myself at the entrance to the Kern River canyon. The hills were on fire with the setting sunlight.


I was excited to be on the road to Lake Isabella, and happy to be off the 99. This road snakes along next to the Kern River and is quite fun!


Darkness was looming, and fell before I reached the town. I stopped for a break and texted Pete to let him know I'd be in quite late. I loaded up the directions to Nip's place in Lone Pine and headed out. Creeping over Walker Pass in the darkness, there were lots of sharp, slow corners. It was cold at this elevation, even this far south! The nearly-full moon illuminated countless peaks all around me. It was surreal.

I was grateful when the road made its descent into the valley and joined up with the 395, the air warming considerably. A brisk hour of riding later and I found Nip's place, pulling in around 11 PM. I was given a quick tour and was quickly overcome with sleep. Nip had even made me a bed! Awww.


The next day, I awoke fairly early, although both Pete and Nip were up far earlier. I heated up some soup I had with me for breakfast. Delicious!


Stopping at a visitor center on our way out of town, we checked on road conditions and grabbed a map of the area.


We took off across the highway, past nearby Keeler, and stopped to air down our tires once we left pavement. We commented that Pete's rear tire seemed to lack knobbies. He called it an experiment. Fair enough! Looking back the way we came, Owens Lake glinted in the distance.


I wasn't sure what to expect from this ride. Pete had said that it would follow a dry wash and I said that this "did not inspire confidence." But, you never know until you try! The road wound up into the mountains.


The road was washboarded but fairly gentle, evenly-graded gravel. A bit steep.


We stopped for a quick break, and enjoyed the nearby derelict mining structures.




At one point I stopped and had no front brakes. I was so startled that I just slowly slid backwards a few feet until I stopped. Thinking that maybe the vibrations had somehow introduced a bubble into the system, I pumped the brake a few times and it started working again. Just... not very well. Well, I'd check it at the top.


We pulled up to Cerro Gordo and I checked my brakes, immediately discovering the nature of the problem. A bolt had shaken loose on the washboard and was lost to the desert. Without the bolt, the caliper had slid half off of the rotor, which was why my brakes had felt spongy. The caretaker, Bob, rolled up on an ATV and Pete and Nip chatted with him a bit.


I explained my problem to Pete, who asked Bob if he had any bailing wire. Sure enough, he came back a minute later and generously offered us the use of a big roll of it and some pliars. Pete set to work.


Before I had too much time to consider whether this was a good idea, Pete was done! The caliper seemed to be solidly attached with the thick wire, and everything cleared the rotor. Pete said that he didn't think I'd have any problems until I could get back to Lone Pine and pick up a spare bolt for it. Thanks Pete!


We looked around at Cerro Gordo for a bit. Silver was discovered here in 1865, and it led to a small, bustling little town which survived until the 1960s, when the machinery was removed. In its heyday, $13 million in silver and lead made its way down that dirt road we'd just come up, making it the most productive silver mine in California. A few of the original buildings remain, and they appear fairly well preserved, no doubt a testament to the hard restoration work of its caretakers. As it's private property, you can rent out some of the buildings, including a restored hotel.




I love ghost towns, so I would have liked to spend more time exploring, but we had a lot more riding in store!




I have to admit a bit of trepidation. This looked really steep, and according to Pete, this side of the "road" never gets graded, so it would likely be worse further on, due to erosion. This was going to be the wash he warned me about earlier. With my front brake held on by bailing wire. Well, I suppose we would deal with problems as they arose...


The road quickly degraded, filling with large rocks and ruts to avoid. I stopped frequently to give myself a chance to decompress, and attempted to mostly use my rear brake to slow down. This wasn't always an option, as the road was quite steep in places, and to be frank, I was often so concerned with making sure the bike stayed upright and not wrapped around a tree that I completely forgot about the bailing wire. Some parts had sandy gravel, and I began to miss the large rocks.


I was terrified. There was a lot of cursing. It was usually repeated, chanted as if a mantra: "Shit. SHIT. Shit! No. Nonono. Left. GO LEFT! Okay. We're okay. Good bike. No. Slow. Go slower. THIS IS NOT A ROAD!!" I feel that letting this out helps to release stress, so I don't attempt to censor it, but Pete seemed to find it amusing when he noticed it.


Eventually, I started to get the hang of things. I started to relax in the few spots where I had the opportunity to do so. Things got a bit easier. However, I was still pretty relieved when we finally reached the bottom. Pete made it look easy, even without knobbies. I was jealous.




The landscape around us was scrubby desaturated desert, small bushes and Joshua trees were the only vegetation for miles. After a quick break to rehydrate and have a snack, we were off again. The less severe grade allowed me to actually use the throttle for once, and I felt like I had more control. The trail seemed to get better for a time. I secretly hoped that the washes were behind me.


"At least this part isn't steep!" I muttered to myself. "I'm sure it will be much better from here!"


... Damnit.

Erosion had reduced the trail to a cavernous rut. I stopped to consider my options, and yelled out to Pete, "How do I do this?" I had never dealt with this kind of problem before. He explained that I could either hug the side of the trail, and not stop, as there would be nowhere to put my foot down, or sometimes the better method is to just ride in the rut and hope for the best. It was nerve-wracking to be unable to stop, but I made it through without dropping it. This was not the only one of these that I had to deal with this day, and it never got any less scary. I frequently had to stop and consider my options, or wait for Pete and Nip to pass me so I could watch the routes they took.

After some scary sand patches, we stopped to look at the map. Nip and Pete had a difference of opinion about what direction we should be going.


At one point the road was straight-up missing, a 5-foot chunk had washed away, and we had to go around. We followed tire tracks up the trail, as it seemed to get increasingly narrower, tree limbs occasionally smacking my bike. I mentioned that I didn't think this was the right way, when we stopped next. "Trucks wouldn't be able to get through here, it's too narrow." Nip insisted that we were going the wrong direction. We doubled back and tried a different route, going up the side of the mountain. This was steep and felt especially treacherous, with the rocks, ruts and long drop off to the side.


It was getting late, and Nip was concerned that we wouldn't get out of the valley by sunset. Pete consulted his GPS, which suggested roads further ahead. We took a look, and they were even more steep and treacherous than the ones we'd been on. No thank you. Eventually we decided that we'd taken a wrong turn further back, so we carefully picked our way back down the mountain and back a few miles the way we'd come. This time, we found the correct route.


Ahhh. After the day's tribulations, finally getting into second and third gear felt like a breath of fresh air. This road was well-graded, and even though I had to be careful of the occasional sandy spot, I stood up and managed to maintain a pretty quick pace (20-30+ mph) as we raced the setting sun.

We met up with the arterial road in this part of Death Valley, Saline Valley Road. This too was fairly well graded, and standing up became a necessity as we jostled over big chunks of what looked like decrepit asphault and through dips and potholes. All too soon, we found pavement once more.


Pete and Nip were in more of a hurry than I was, and sped along Highway 190. I hung back and went at a more leisurely pace, enjoying the setting sunlight on the mountains.


One thing that Pete said really stuck with me.

"I'm having a really hard time figuring out where to aim. I've never had to do this before! Usually there's... a road."

"Do you know what technical riding is?"

"... Riding in difficult terrain?"

"Technical riding is putting the tire exactly where it needs to go. Not where it wants to go, but where it needs to be to navigate around obstacles. You need to look further ahead and start making decisions faster to line that up."

This was by far the most challenging riding I'd ever done, and I was proud that I didn't drop the bike, crash, or give up out of fear. I may spend a lot of time being terrified, but that doesn't mean I'm not also having fun (roller coasters scare the crap out of me too), and over time as I get more skilled, the terror will become blunted through gaining confidence and sheer desensitization. This day re-calibrated my concept of what I was capable of riding on, and I never would have attempted anything remotely like this solo.

All in all, it was a good day!

Feyala screwed with this post 12-25-2012 at 05:45 PM
Feyala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2012, 05:42 PM   #562
Feyala OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Wandering...
Oddometer: 358
Hey everybody!

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

... Or whatever you happen to celebrate!

Thought I forgot about you? Thought you could escape that easily?

WRONG!

I have been busy with holiday stuff and also some sort of projectile vomiting flu plague thing which I am now finally getting over. I've heard it's been going around. Beware!

I'm closing in on updates, I've got a few more from death valley, then saline and manzanar and I'll be to the accident, which is just in time, because my wrist is getting pretty close to healed and I'm more than eager to get on the road again. I need to fix stuff (it's kind of hard to work metal with a gimpy dominant wrist), apply for passport renewal, bla bla bla. I'll be in Phoenix until at least the new year I think, but I'm hoping I'll have my shit together enough to leave shortly thereafter.

I'll do replies and another update in the next day or two.

Anyways! Hope you are having a good time of it, and try not to get too drunk.
Feyala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2012, 05:52 PM   #563
WeazyBuddha
Carbon-Based Humanoid
 
WeazyBuddha's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: RGV Texas
Oddometer: 4,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feyala View Post
**Snip**

There was a lot of cursing. It was usually repeated, chanted as if a mantra: "Shit. SHIT. Shit! No. Nonono. Left. GO LEFT! Okay. We're okay. Good bike. No. Slow. Go slower. THIS IS NOT A ROAD!!"

**Snip**

All in all, it was a good day!


Enjoying the RR, you have guts venturing "out there" with a thin safety net.

Missing brake bolts, rough running motor, you keep moving along. Admirable.

__________________
A drunk driver killed someone I love
WeazyBuddha is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 08:04 AM   #564
Ratman
Lucky Rider
 
Ratman's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Baja is good
Oddometer: 1,103
Fey's first day in Death Valley

Quote:
Originally Posted by Feyala View Post
........ and over time as I get more skilled, the terror will become blunted through gaining confidence and sheer desensitization. This day re-calibrated my concept of what I was capable of riding on, and I never would have attempted anything remotely like this solo.

All in all, it was a good day!
Well reported, Fey. She's not lying. That's what it was like.

I was surprised that she didn't drop her bike at least once. I thought that Fay being short would cause her problems at the super careful slow speeds. In her favor is that she is strong so when the bike is a little tippy she can keep it up with just a tip toe on the ground.

I really enjoyed my day with her and Nip.....and I should have listened to Nip a lot sooner on routing directions, after all Nip lives there and has a very good instinct about the geography. He kept saying that, if the suns over there then we need to go that way. And he was right.

I hope to be reading RRs soon of you burning up new roads to write about, Fey.
__________________
Ratman.......Pete .... My Solo Continental Divide Ride
....and of course, Luck beats good...
OLDEN DAYS...mostly BAJA
p.ratfab@gmail.com
Ratman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 03:45 PM   #565
rugbyrtcwka
railroader
 
rugbyrtcwka's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Oddometer: 512
Wow

Great RR Fey! I'm in for the long haul now. Lot's of poeple made great comments about you tank slapper situation with respect on how to fix it. One thing no one said (I think) was that, you can make all the adjustments in the world to fix it, and it may be fixed for a time, but, as soon and you change your loads weight distribution ( ie take the cans off, add tank bag, fork bag, etc) you change the geometry of the bike and you will be back to square one.

Bottom line, you tank slapper happened at 80 MPH. Even though those bikes are capable of that speed, they were never designed to do that speed. All the TS's that I have been made aware of ( and I've seen and heard many) were made at speeds in excess of 70 MPH.

I suggest you find a good set up that balances you harmonics for the bike while loaded ( after you find the best way to load ) and keep your speed to the limit or below, and you will never have another TS again.

Looking forward to reading more of your life onthe road. Stay safe, and happy new year.
__________________
Old enough to know better but probably do it again.
rugbyrtcwka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 05:24 PM   #566
PHOTON PHIL
THe REAL poser
 
PHOTON PHIL's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Green Township N.J.
Oddometer: 249
Thumb

Have a happy new Fey and safe riding. I am really enjoying you ride report and so is my 15 year old daughter
__________________
Out on the road somewhere
2013 Vstrom 650
If loud pipes save lives, just imagine what learning to ride that thing could do.
PHOTON PHIL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 01:51 PM   #567
NomadGal
Esther
 
NomadGal's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
Oddometer: 986
Hey Fey, how are the tank bags coming along?
NomadGal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 02:34 PM   #568
Warin
Retired
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Oddometer: 1,571
Dakar lessons?

Trust your lookin at the Dakar video...

See how far back the riders sit on the bike in sand? And how much the bike shakes through the sand! And the riders that don't sit back come to regret it?

Hope the link works - first part is cars... last bit is bikes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OU-N...TeOA-S&index=2
Warin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:06 PM   #569
Feyala OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Wandering...
Oddometer: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadGal View Post
Hey Fey, how are the tank bags coming along?
Hey lady! I figured out the design I wanted finally. I'm doing this the clunky way, so I'm making prototypes (out of old phone book paper and masking tape lol) to make sure they aren't going to hit my knees when I'm riding close to the tank, should be done with that tonight. Then I need to cut some scrap fabric (old pants) in the shapes I want, see how it fits on the prototypes, and then take it apart to use as a pattern. I'm sure there's probably an easier way to do this, but I don't make stuff out of fabric often, so I'm sure it'll be a learning process!

Sure, I could just buy some atv panniers but where's the fun in that? I like the form factor of these ones but they aren't as deep as I'd like, and the zippers seem to invite water in, I'm probably going to inner line my bags with a shower curtain type material and fold it over at the top ala drybag to help keep it water resistant.

My new rear tire arrived today, tube should be in tomorrow, I've got pants coming from an inmate, and a new years resolution type gift to myself.. some resistance bands so I can work out while on the road and be less of a weakling. Still need to fix the box and get the rack straightened out. Too much shit to do, lol.
Feyala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:09 PM   #570
Feyala OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Wandering...
Oddometer: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warin View Post
Trust your lookin at the Dakar video...

See how far back the riders sit on the bike in sand? And how much the bike shakes through the sand! And the riders that don't sit back come to regret it?

Hope the link works - first part is cars... last bit is bikes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OU-N...TeOA-S&index=2
I was watching that entire video with a "" type expression, because augh sand.

I can see what you mean, but. Yikes.

Maybe someday I'll be that competent.
Feyala is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014