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Old 08-30-2012, 12:19 AM   #31
Burra Boy
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Laugh

Yes, of course! Silly me - I should have figured that out myself

I've already got one request for a stand. All I need is a slightly warmer shed
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Old 09-01-2012, 10:55 PM   #32
french horn OP
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Back into it guys.

Grab the cross member, slip it into the LEFT leg/socket.... pin it.




From the LEFT side of the bike, place the leg onto the pivot pin ...




move to the right side and insert the cross member partly into the RIGHT LEG socket then continue the insertion while fitting the leg to the pivot pin .... lock it all together with the shaft pin.

.

Now for the big test:

Being an unusual method (to me anyway), I got my two best friends to help me for confidence sake ... just incase.
So ... the three of us, Me, Myself and I, once I placed my left foot in front of and on the foot of the stand, gingerly lifted the bike while guiding it forward ... over the high point then down to rest fully on the stand ...WOW .. IT WORKS....

.


This pic shows that the pivot pin isn't all the way through the leg, though almost. Because I used the "pivot tubes", all should be good to go.
.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now that the bike is "standing", I realise two things :
1. The angle is unnecessarily excessive
2. The legs are a little too long for easy lifting of the bike

Solution:
Place a shim between the leg(s) and footpeg mount(s).

I had a piece of flatbar 3mm thick .... tacked a piece in.... much better.... welded shim to leg(s).


.

that 3mm raised the rear wheel a further 20 or more mm.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The next step is to take a felt tip marker and mark all the way around each foot, parallel to the floor. To do this, I lay the marker flat on the floor, you may need a small sheet of material beneath the marker. It's also a good time to check the groung clearance of the rear tyre. Each 10mm cut from the leg will lower the rear tyre by about 15mm (not exact but very close). Keep in mind the tread depth of a new tyre as well.

.

.

After calculating ground clearance, cut along the lines.

THIS NEXT STEP IS OPTIONAL ... it has two purposes if required.
1... if your stand is too short (lack of ground clearance at rear tyre) we can lengthen it.
2... if you want feet for softer ground, this will help .... to a point.
I may refer to the above with "point 1" .. or "point 2".

.................................................. ..............................

Using the same material as your cross member sockets, cut two lengths at 40mm. Slip them onto the lower portion of the legs then mark as you did the legs.... all the way around.
.

...... cut along the lines.

Sorry folks, I've been told to prepair for our kids to arrive ... well it's fathers day and I might ... just might get a prezi to unwrap.
happy fathers day all you dads ... have a good one.

I shall return

french horn screwed with this post 09-06-2012 at 05:15 AM
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Old 09-09-2012, 10:03 PM   #33
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I cut two semi-circles (pads) from a bit of scrap sheet steel, (a radius of 88mm will fit into a tool tube made of downpipe)




Then I welded the pads onto the "shoes?" we made earlier ... ensuring to align the back of the shoe with the rear edge of the pad ... central would be good too.


At this point, you can decide to either weld the shoe onto the leg or have it as a slip-on.

If your legs were too short then now is when you can lengthen them ... by welding the shoes appropriately ....10mm added length here is about 15mm hight increase at the rear tyre.

If you choose to have slip-on shoes, then I suggest a few gentle taps with a hammer and small drift on ONE side of the shoe, as shown below. Too much of a hit is not easy to rectify so, gently dose it.


Apart from a lick of your fav. paint, THAT'S IT ...ALL DONE ... FINITO.

Please post any questions and suggestions here folks, they can help others.

I hope you like the stand and it becomes useful to you guys.

cheers for now
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Old 09-09-2012, 10:18 PM   #34
victor441
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Thanks very much for taking the time to post your work, will definitely make one for my DR and personally I prefer that it is a takedown design
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Old 09-10-2012, 04:12 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by victor441 View Post
Thanks very much for taking the time to post your work, will definitely make one for my DR and personally I prefer that it is a takedown design

My pleasure mate, enjoy the build ... then the usefulness.

This may seem a stupid question but I'm gunna ask it anyhow :

In the good ol' U.S. of A., are metric measurements common ... can you purchace steel etc. in metric measurements?

Most curious

cheers
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Old 09-10-2012, 04:26 AM   #36
MacG
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Excellent idea AND write-up ! Thanks for sharing your work
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Old 09-10-2012, 04:46 AM   #37
Burra Boy
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Originally Posted by french horn View Post
My pleasure mate, enjoy the build ... then the usefulness.

This may seem a stupid question but I'm gunna ask it anyhow :

In the good ol' U.S. of A., are metric measurements common ... can you purchace steel etc. in metric measurements?

Most curious

cheers
Mate, haven't you ever watched 'American Chopper'?

'That's 1 and 5 sixteenths and a neck extension of 6 and 27 thirtyseconds inches and I'll weld it without a welding helmet or gloves...'

I doubt they've ever heard of metric.

Mind you, our wheels are measured in inches after all this time so maybe we can't talk
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Old 09-10-2012, 10:03 AM   #38
victor441
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Quote:
Originally Posted by french horn View Post
My pleasure mate, enjoy the build ... then the usefulness.

This may seem a stupid question but I'm gunna ask it anyhow :

In the good ol' U.S. of A., are metric measurements common ... can you purchace steel etc. in metric measurements?

Most curious

cheers

nope, nearly everything is still inches, gallons, miles, etc. Awhile back I needed a tape measure with metric markings and even that was hard to find, had to try several stores. The government has tried to push conversion a few times over the years without success....personally I wish we made the leap, had to learn and use both systems in college engineering classes and greatly preferred metric once I got used to it

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrica..._United_States

victor441 screwed with this post 09-11-2012 at 11:10 PM
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:22 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victor441 View Post
nope, nearly everything is still inches, gallons, miles, etc. Awhile back I needed a tape measure with metric markings and even that was hard to find, had to try several stores. The government has tried to push conversion a few times over the years without success....personally I wish we made the leap, had to learn and use both systems in college engineering classes and greatly preferred metric once I got used to it
Geez mate, that makes it difficult in a few ways ..... I guess 4/10" would do for the footpeg bolt holes in the mounting plate but 1.574 803 149 6 inch between centers is gunna be hard to get , it's gotta be exact.

As for material sizes, I guess you have to get as close as you can and fudge a bit .... maybe I can help out from time to time.

Thanks for the info victor441, I should have converted as I went We (oz) made the change to decimal money in '66, not too hard to understand ... then we changed from imperial to metric between '70-'88 ... it took a while ... worth it though.

cheers for now
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:19 AM   #40
Burra Boy
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Originally Posted by french horn View Post
Geez mate, that makes it difficult in a few ways ..... I guess 4/10" would do for the footpeg bolt holes in the mounting plate but 1.574 803 149 6 inch between centers is gunna be hard to get , it's gotta be exact.

As for material sizes, I guess you have to get as close as you can and fudge a bit .... maybe I can help out from time to time.

Thanks for the info victor441, I should have converted as I went We (oz) made the change to decimal money in '66, not too hard to understand ... then we changed from imperial to metric between '70-'88 ... it took a while ... worth it though.

cheers for now
Decimal currency was introduced on the 14th of February 1966. I should know. My father wrote all the jingles for the advertising that preceded it - he used to come home and test them out on my brother and me...

Hijack over
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Old 09-12-2012, 05:19 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by Burra Boy View Post
Decimal currency was introduced on the 14th of February 1966. I should know. My father wrote all the jingles for the advertising that preceded it - he used to come home and test them out on my brother and me...

Hijack over
Not over just yet ...... so you've heard this before?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZVEEs-RJpw

My wife and I were discussing this very matter a week ago, she remembered the jingle ... ... congrats to your dad.

Hijack over..and out
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Old 11-21-2012, 11:39 AM   #42
JerryH
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Very nice work, but I don't see the point. There is a storebought centerstand available for the DR650, as well as the KLR650. In fact there are at least two manufacturers that make centerstand for these bikes. I have a Cigar Mike centerstand on my XT225, and have banged it on all kinds of things. No damage other than scratches.

If for some reason you didn't want a centerstand, I think I would do what I did with my 250 Rebel. The DR650 has footpeg bolts i the same place. I just designed a simple prop rod (a piece of pipe welded to a flat plate at an angle, with 2 holes in the flat plate that matched the footpeg bolts) To use it, I put the stock sidestand on a piece of 2x4 to get the bike nearly vertical, then unbolted the right footpeg and bolted on the prop rod in it's place. This got the wheels off the ground, and was very easy to carry around. Whichever wheel I was going to remove, I would lock the brake on the other one so it couldn't move. It was very stable. But for me, nothing beats a bolt on centerstand. The BMW 1200GS, apparently the most popular adventure bike in the world comes with one.
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Old 12-21-2012, 02:08 AM   #43
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Very nice work, but I don't see the point. There is a storebought centerstand available for the DR650, as well as the KLR650. In fact there are at least two manufacturers that make centerstand for these bikes. I have a Cigar Mike centerstand on my XT225, and have banged it on all kinds of things. No damage other than scratches.

If for some reason you didn't want a centerstand, I think I would do what I did with my 250 Rebel. The DR650 has footpeg bolts i the same place. I just designed a simple prop rod (a piece of pipe welded to a flat plate at an angle, with 2 holes in the flat plate that matched the footpeg bolts) To use it, I put the stock sidestand on a piece of 2x4 to get the bike nearly vertical, then unbolted the right footpeg and bolted on the prop rod in it's place. This got the wheels off the ground, and was very easy to carry around. Whichever wheel I was going to remove, I would lock the brake on the other one so it couldn't move. It was very stable. But for me, nothing beats a bolt on centerstand. The BMW 1200GS, apparently the most popular adventure bike in the world comes with one.

G'day jerry, thanks for your comments mate.
You're right, there are several options out there, but I enjoy welding etc. so I thought I might give it a go. In my first post I posted a link http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....ostcount=12274 check it out . That shows why I went with the "takedown" system, the challenge man, the challenge.

cheers
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